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Full text of "Annual report of the Town of Andover"

FOR REFERENCE 

Do Not Take From This Room 



~ 1999 Annual Report 




A N D O VE R 



Massachusetts 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/annualreportofto1999ando 



TOWN OF ANDOVER 



1999 ANNUAL REPORT 



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PREPARED BY THE TOWN MANAGER 

PURSUANT TO THE PROVISIONS OF CHAPTER 40, 

SECTION 49 OF THE GENERAL LAWS OF THE 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS AND 

ARTICLE II, SECTION 4 OF THE GENERAL BY-LAWS OF 

THE TOWN OF ANDOVER 



COVER PHOTO TAKEN AT THE PARK 
COURTESY OF ANDOVER RESIDENT ROBERT A. DENNIS 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

1999 ACCOMPLISHMENTS 6 

ANIMAL INSPECTION 88 

BALLARD VALE HISTORIC DISTRICT COMMISSION 91 

BOARD OF SELECTMEN 4 

COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT & PLANNING 26 

BUILDING DIVISION 26 

CONSERVATION DIVISION 30 

ELECTRICAL INSPECTION 27 

HEALTH DIVISION 31 

PLANNING DIVISION 35 

PLUMBING & GAS 27 

ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 27 

DIRECTORY OF COMMITTEES & BOARDS 174 

DIRECTORY OF DEPARTMENT/DIVISION HEADS 178 

DIVISION OF COMMUNITY SERVICES 62 

DIVISION OF ELDER SERVICES 66 

DIVISION OF YOUTH SERVICES 73 

FINANCE & BUDGET 14 

ASSESSORS 15 

CENTRAL PURCHASING 15 

COLLECTOR/TREASURER . 16 

INFORMATION SYSTEMS . . . 17 

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 96 

FIRE DEPARTMENT 59 

GREATER LAWRENCE TECHNICAL SCHOOL 87 

HOUSING AUTHORITY 89 

HOW TO REACH YOUR ELECTED OFFICIALS 182 

HOW CAN WE HELP YOU? 179 

HUMAN RESOURCES DEPARTMENT 79 



JOHN CORNELL FUEL ASSISTANCE FUND 92 

MARGARET G. TOWLE FUND . 92 

MEMORIAL HALL LIBRARY 50 

PLANT AND FACILITIES DEPARTMENT 37 

BUILDING MAINTENANCE . . 38 

ELECTRICAL/MECHANICAL 38 

FORESTRY 41 

MUNICIPAL BUILDINGS 41 

PARKS & GROUNDS 39 

SPRING GROVE CEMETERY 40 

VEHICLE MAINTENANCE _.. 41 

POLICE DEPARTMENT 53 

ANIMAL CONTROL 55 

DETECTIVE DIVISION 54 

EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT 55 

OPERATIONS DIVISION . 53 

RECORDS DIVISION 54 

PRESERVATION COMMISSION 90 

PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT 45 

ENGINEERING 45 

GREATER LAWRENCE SANITARY DISTRICT 48 

HIGHWAY 46 

SEWER 48 

SOLID WASTE 47 

WATER 47 

SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 75 

TOWN CLERK 24 

TOWN COUNSEL 23 

TOWN MANAGER 1 

TOWN MEETING MINUTES 117 

TRUSTEES OF PUNCHARD FREE SCHOOL 93 

VETERANS SERVICES 75 

WE WOULD LIKE TO HEAR FROM YOU 183 




TOWN OF ANDOVER 

MASSACHUSETTS 



Town Offices 
36 Bartlet Street 
Andover, MA 01810 
(508) 623-8200 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen and Citizens of Andover: 



New Year's Eve, December 31, 1999 is when we chose to celebrate the new millennium, 
despite the debate presented by some who claim the new century and millennium really doesn't start 
until December 30, 2000! The Millennium Committee hosted a series of family events on New 
Year's Eve that entertained young and old alike. The evening laser shows were a delightful sight 
and sound celebration. 



The 1999 Annual Town Meeting, conducted over four days in late April and early May, 
presented the Town Meeting members with 98 warrant articles to consider and act upon. At the 
conclusion of the meeting, it was felt by all that something needed to be done to limit the number 
of warrant articles as the meeting was becoming too cumbersome. During the year, the Town Clerk 
met with senior staff to find ways to streamline the meeting. The Town Moderator assembled a blue 
ribbon group to come up with improvement ideas. The League of Women Voters also examined 
the subject and issued a series of recommendations to make the meeting work better. 

Some argue that Andover is becoming too big, too urban to conduct business through an 
Open Town Meeting. They suggest moving to a Representative Town Meeting or even becoming 
a city. 

When the debate ends and the dust settles, it is doubtful that Andoverites will want to give 
up their Open Town Meeting. After all, Andover, with 31,000 residents and 19,000 registered 
voters, is the largest municipality in the world with the Open Town Meeting form of government 
where any one of the 1 9,000 registered voters can come to Town Meeting to stand up, speak directly 
and vote on their own behalf! Why give up our direct democracy? 

Now, on the subject of the 1999 Annual Town Meeting, the following highlights were 
approved by the voters: 

• Sewer Construction - South Main Street, Ballardvale Road and Rogers Brook areas. The 

sum of $26.8 million was approved to extend the sewer system to cover an additional 1,500 
homes. Sewer construction is expected to begin in the Summer of 2000 and continue for up 
to five years. 

-1- 



The Honorable Board of Selectmen and Citizens of Andover 
Page Two 



• Public Safety Center - North Main Street. The sum of $12.9 million was appropriated for 
the construction of a new 46,410 sq. ft. police and fire station to replace the existing 23,245 
sq. ft. station. The plans for the new facility were finalized in 1 999 and demolition and 
construction is scheduled to start in June/July 2000. 

• Lease Agreement with Phillips Academy for a Senior Center. Town Meeting gave the Board 
of Selectmen permission to lease Williams Hall from Phillips Academy for a new Senior 
Center for a term of thirty years. The Board approved the lease agreement in November and 
fundraising by the Friends of Andover Senior Center is now underway. 

• New Elementary and Middle Schools - Planning Funds. The voters approved $2.5million 
for architectural and engineering plans for a 564 student elementary school and 450 student 
middle school on a 37 acre site at High Plain Road and Cross Street. 

Over the Summer, an architectural firm was hired and a new School Building Committee 
was formed. They went to work designing the new schools, meeting with faculty/staff, 
residents and neighbors to hear their concerns and expectations regarding these new 
educational facilities. As the year ended, the S31.9M appropriation to construct the new 
schools and required sewer service will be on the Warrant for the 2000 Annual Town 
Meeting. 

• Wetland Protection Bylaw - The Conservation Commission won approval from the Town 
Meeting members to create a local, non-zoning, wetlands protection bylaw to better protect 
the Town's wetlands and public water supply. During 1999, the Conservation Commission 
was at work drafting the necessary rules and regulations to put this local bylaw into effect. 

Several important infrastructure and building projects were in the design/development, 
engineering or study phase in 1999. 

• Essex Sand and Gravel Pit. The Department of Plant and Facilities engaged an engineering 
firm to study and report on the recreational land-use options for the old sand and gravel pit 
adjacent to Rec Park and Pomps Pond. Public meetings were held to obtain comments, 
reactions and recommendations from neighbors, youth sport leaders and environmentalists. 
A warrant article will be put forth at the 2000 Annual Town Meeting to appropriate $1.1 
million to construct three new ballfields and related improvements. 

Town Yard Study. The Department of Public Works and the Department of Plant and 
Facilities worked with a consultant on a needs and feasibility study and report for a new 
Town Yard to house their divisions either at the existing Lewis Street site or other locations 
in Town. By year end, the consultant reported that at least five acres in a rectangular shape 
would be needed for a yard. The current Lewis Street yard has only three acres in a 
triangular shape. Other locations are being considered, as well as the purchase of 
land/houses adjacent to the present yard-fi> provide more growing room. 



OFFICE OF THE TOWN MANAGER, ANDOVER, MASSACHUSETTS 01810 (978) 623-8200 



The Honorable Board of Selectmen and Citizens of Andover 
Page Three 



• Main Street and Downtown Improvements. The Planning Board and staff conducted six 

focus groups to obtain comments/recommendations on the proposed Main Street 
improvement project and other downtown issues with business owners, landlords and 
residents. The results of these meetings are summarized in a report drafted by a temporary 
planner. 

The $2.5 million Urban Systems Grant from the Commonwealth for pedestrian and vehicular 
safety improvements was in design review most of the year because bike lane waivers were 
sought and rejected by the Massachusetts Highway Department. Lane widths and sidewalks 
were re-designed to address the bike lane issue and re-submitted to the Massachusetts 
Highway Department. Traffic calming, pedestrian safety and street amenities characterize 
the proposal. Once the Massachusetts Highway Department gives its approval to the plan, 
they will conduct a 25% design public hearing to receive public input and then direct the 
Town to proceed to design development. 

In December, during their annual real estate tax classification deliberation, the Board of 
Selectmen voted to reduce the tax classification shift from 30% to 26%. 

Last but not least, several employees deserve special acknowledgment. Thirty-year veteran 
Robert E. McQuade, Director of Public Works, retired in October and John J. Petkus, Jr. was 
selected as the new Director. Both Elaine M. Shola, Purchasing Agent, and Joseph R. Piantedosi, 
Director of Plant and Facilities, attended the Inspector General's classes and passed the exams to 
be recognized as Massachusetts Certified Public Purchasing Officials. John D. O'Donnell, Jr. 
passed an exam to become a Massachusetts Certified Arborist. Collector/Treasurer David J. Reilly 
received his certification to become a Certified Massachusetts Municipal Tax Collector. Morris B. 
Gray was promoted to the newly created position of Superintendent of Water and Sewer 
Distribution. William J. Krajeski, Chief Assessor, resigned during the Summer to take a position 
in the private sector, and Bruce A. Symmes was appointed as the new Chief Assessor. 

As can be seen, the twentieth century closed on a note of progress marked by change. The 
voters can take pride in knowing that all elected and appointed officials are working in your best 
interest to make Andover a preeminent community in which to live, to raise a family and to earn a 
living. We look forward to hearing from you in the new century and the new millennium. 

Respectfully submitted, 



Q Reginald S. Stapczyn$»ci t// 



Town Manager 

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OFFICE OF THE TOWN MANAGER, ANDOVER, MASSACHUSETTS 01810 (978) 623-8200 




TOWN OF ANDOVER 

MASSACHUSETTS 



Town Offices 
36 Bartlet Street 
Andover, MA 01810 
(508) 623-8200 



Dear Andover Citizens: 

My greetings to all of you and best wishes for the coming year. Certainly we ended last year 
in a big way. The Millennium arrived with a laser show and plenty of action at the big New Year's 
Eve celebration in Andover. By all accounts, it was a fun-filled evening for all of the families who 
attended the party hosted by the Town. If anything, the event was too successful, judging by the 
size of the crowds. Stay tuned for more parties/events where we can all gather and celebrate 
together. 

These celebrations signaled not only the beginning of a new century but the end of a very 
busy 1 999 for the Town. It heralded what has so far been an even busier new year. The very active 
economy has certainly been felt in Andover as businesses are booming, creating growth in 
commercial property tax revenue for the Town and in excise taxes and in hotel/motel taxes. But this 
"success" has also created traffic tie ups, frustrations about the impacts on residential streets and 
neighborhoods, and concerns over our open space. The growth has also fueled our needs for new 
schools, new senior center, new youth center, new sewers, new ballfields, new public safety center 
and more. I encourage everyone to learn more about these and the other issues our Town is facing, 
and urge you to attend the Annual Town Meeting on April 24th & 25th and May 1st & 2nd. Your 
vote does count and your voice does need to be heard. 

During the past year the Board of Selectmen have been actively pursuing several factors that 
influence the way the Town functions. One of my favorites has been our effort to give more 
recognition to the wonderful volunteers who help our Town to function so well. We have taken 
steps to address affordable housing concerns by reconstituting the Andover Housing Partnership 
Committee. Also, we have been able to increase communications between the School Committee, 
the Finance Committee and the Board of Selectmen through the Strategic Planning Task Force. 
There is certainly more to do but this group has been making progress as we struggle with the 
Town's budget and the forces that influence it. This Task Force has been struggling with the 
question, "where is the balance between the services the Town needs and the financial pressures they 
create for the taxpayer?" 

In 1 999 we witnessed a sad event when former Andover Selectman Janet Lake passed away. 
There has been a general passing of the torch, if I may use that phrase, at least at the Board of 
Selectmen level. After this year's Annual Town Election, the longest sitting member will have 

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served for only three years. This transition period also has seen the appointment of a new Police 
Chief (1998), a new DPW Director (1999) and the expected new Fire Chief in the spring/summer 
of 2000. One change that wasn't a change was the re-appointment of the Town Manager after ten 
years of services to Andover. 

We also have had, it seems, an unusual number of border disputes in the past year. Whether 
it is a cell tower to the north, industrial growth and traffic to the south, a paint plant to the west, or 
a housing complex to the east, we must find ways to better relate to our neighbor cities and towns 
so that we can try to control what happens and make the best possible decisions for Andover. 

All of these changes are more reasons why we need your help and your suggestions for the 
Town. What is your vision for the community where you were born or where you have chosen to 
live? Let us know what you think; keep up the good work as volunteers throughout the Town; and 
let's make the next year as productive as the past! 



Sinceiejy yours, 





P. Hess, Chairman 
<Andover Board of Selectmen 



The Town of Andover, more than a place to live, is a way of life. Its legacy of democracy 
shall be preserved. Each citizen should experience the treasure of nature, history, individual 
respect, neighborhood and learning. As resources and energy allow, each of these gifts from the 
past will be enriched in the present for those yet to be. 



VISION STATEMENT OF THE 
ANDOVER BOARD OF SELECTMEN 



OFFICE OF THE TOWN MANAGER, ANDOVER. MASSACHUSETTS 01810 (978) 623-8200 




TOWN OF ANDOVER 

MASSACHUSETTS 



Town Offices 
36 Bartlet Street 
Andover, MA 01810 
(508)623-8200 

TO: 
FROM: 
SUBJ: 
DATE: 



MEMORANDUM 



Board of Selectmen 

Reginald S. Stapczynski, Town Manager 

1999 Accomplishments 

December 31, 1999 




This memo highlights some of the major accomplishments of each department for calendar 
year 1 999. The items described represent a sampling of what we consider to be the most significant 
achievements of the year. 

POLICE DEPARTMENT 

• Three Lieutenants and five Sergeants were promoted in order to provide adequate 
supervision within the various divisions. 

• The Department received $318,622 in state and federal grants for community policing 
initiatives, DARE and other informative/educational programs for community and 
departmental personnel. 

• Implemented a Traffic Division in order to combat the increasing traffic related problems 
within the neighborhoods, and participated in various task forces and community groups in 
an effort to maintain the quality of life. 

• A K-9 Unit was started through community policing funds and has been expanded into a 
drug detection unit through exhaustive training with the Boston Police K-9 Academy. 

FIRE DEPARTMENT 

Hired five new firefighters on the department and implemented Fire Academy training for 
all of them. 

• Through the Fire Prevention Office, continue to maintain Andover as a fire safe community 
for its' residents, visitors and people who work here. 

• The Fire and Police Departments received approval for a $ 1 2.9 million state of the art public 
safety facility that will allow for future expansion and provide quality public safety for the 
Town. 

-6- 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS 

Administration 

Department of Public Works Director Robert E. McQuade retired after 30 years of service 
to the Town. John J. Petkus, Jr. was appointed as the new Department of Public Works 
Director. 

Engineering Division 

• Work was completed to estimate, quantify and prepare documents for the reconstruction and 
resurfacing of 56 Town roads totaling 10.7 miles in length at a cost of $928,397. 

• Eight thousand five hundred feet of existing sidewalks were designed and reconstructed on 
William Street, High Street and Locke Street for $396,158. Survey and design work was 
also performed for future sidewalk reconstruction on Maple Avenue, Summer Street (Elm 
Street to Whittier Street), Andover Street (Woburn Street to High Vale Lane), River Street 
(Andover Street to house #57) and Chestnut Street. 

• Preliminary work was performed with the Town's consultant for the design of the sewer 
extensions for the Rogers Brook Area, the South Main Street/Ballardvale Road Area, the 
Cross Street/Forest Hills Drive Area and Beacon Street. 

• Preliminary work was performed with the Town's consultant for the design of repairs to the 
Hussey's Pond Dam and the River Street Bridge. 

• Inspections and tests were performed on twelve active subdivisions and twelve industrial site 
developments to insure the proper installation of sewer mains, drain lines, roadways and 
sidewalks. 

Water & Sewer Division 

• Andover' s drinking water system produced over two billion gallons of water in 1 999. Water 
quality surpassed all Federal and State Regulations. The Water Division was recognized for 
excellence in communications under the Safe Drinking Water Act Consumer Confidence 
Rule. It received a first place finish in Region I USEPA for its 1999 Water Quality Report. 

• Pumped 1.31 billion gallons of sewage to the Greater Lawrence Sanitary District to be 
processed and disposed to meet Federal and State environmental regulations. 

• Replacements of water mains: Windsor Street (entire length) and Brook Street (entire 
length), and sewer mains: Chestnut Street (Whittier Street-Bartlet Street), Central Street 
(Chestnut Street-Brook Street) and Brook Street (entire length). 

• Morris Gray was promoted to the newly created position of Superintendent of Water and 
Sewer Distribution. 

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FY-99 FY-98 



8 


7 


423 


431 


2,357 


2,213 


48 


39 


4 


5 



Recycling 

• Tons recycled: 

Steel/tin containers 

Glass 

Paper 

Plastics (#1 & #2) 

Aluminum materials 

DIVISION OF COMMUNITY SERVICES 

The Shawsheen Fields Playground was installed. This is the first new playground in fifteen 
years at the lower Shawsheen field. Renovations included masonry work to the walls, 
paving the track, curbing and parking lot improvements. 

Improvements to Pomp's Pond continues with the purchase of a new dock system. Over 
sixty individuals took advantage of the new sailing program. The sail fleet encompasses five 
sailboats. 

• DCS was asked by the Church Basketball League to offer a youth league for elementary 
students in grades 1-3. This new program was highly successful. 

DIVISION OF YOUTH SERVICES 

• The Division of Youth Services was created in July. A new Program Assistant position was 
funded at the Annual Town Meeting to assist the Director of Youth Services in providing 
program and administrative support. 

• The temporary skatepark was made permanent and additional improvements were made: 
new fence, landscaping, seal-coated surface and more ramps. A well-trained staff 
contributed to making this year as successful as the first year. 

Andover was one of three towns statewide to receive the Kenneth E. Pickard Municipal 
Innovation Award from the Massachusetts Municipal Association. The award recognized 
the Andover Community Skate Park as a unique and creative project. This two-year 
collaborative effort linked the Plant & Facilities Department, Board of Selectman, School 
Committee, Police Department and community organizations with the youth, produced one 
of the finest skateparks on the East Coast. 

• AYS developed a multifaceted Summer Program that involved over one thousand young 
people. The ten- week program offered a wide variety of trips, adventures, camps, clinics, 
services and extended trips for young people 11-16 years old. Additions to the AYS 
Summer Program were the Summer Shack, an expanded Girls of Summer program, a 
Mountain Biking program, the Summer Track program and an Introduction to Lacrosse 
program for boys and girls 8-10 years old. 

-8- 



• For the first time in Andover High School history, a boy's lacrosse team took the field in 
competitive play. Led by Head Coach Wayne Puglisi, the team went on to have a wildly 
successful season. In 2000, the team will be elevated to Varsity status and there will be a 
JVteam as well! 

DIVISION OF ELDER SERVICES 

• The Division of Elder Services received the U.N./U.S. Committee on the International Year 
of the Older Person Award for excellence in intergenerational programs. The United 
Nations theme was: "Towards a Society for All Ages". The Division also received the ROSE 
Award from the Governor and the Executive Office of Elder Affairs for excellence in senior 
programming and services. 

• Received grants to provide a new format for social day care services to reach out and help 
elders make the transition to social day care or provide respite to care givers. 

• A transportation study was conducted by Merrimack College students and an agreement was 
reached with MVRTA for two additional vans. 

• The Senior Center Building Committee and staff worked with the architects and Town 
departments on the development of the new Senior Center at Will Hall. 

COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT AND PLANNING 

Building Division 

• Participated in the interview process for the selection of the architectural firm for the new 
elementary and middle schools at Cross Street and High Plain Road and the Senior Center 
project. 

• A second Local Building Inspector was hired filling all Building Division positions. 

• Revised the filing fees for petitions to the Zoning Board of Appeals. 

Building Division proposed a successful Zoning By-Law change at the April Annual Town 
Meeting. This enabled the Division to enforce the removal of secondhand junk or scrap 
materials and trash stored in the open. 

Conservation Division 

• Annual Town Meeting established a local Wetland By-law in order to better protect 
Andover' s wetland resources and the Commission drafted the new Rules and Regulations 
to enforce the new By-law. 



-9- 



Health Division 



Signed contact with NESWC/Lexington Regional Household Waste facility to provide 
residents with a disposal capacity alternative beyond the annual collection. Negotiated and 
implemented intermunicipal agreements with Wilmington, North Reading, and Chelmsford 
to provide additional household hazardous waste collection event days. 

• Represented Andover's environmental and public health concerns regarding the proposed 
Dracut Power Plant as Intervener at the State Energy Facility Board and Dracut Special 
Permit hearings. 

• Designed and implemented a waiver protocol for failed septic systems for the area proposed 
to be sewered in South Andover. 

Expanded the Hepatitis B program at the Andover schools to include high school seniors. 

• Upgraded Licensing and Certification Program and regulations for massage therapists to 
require national certification. 

Planning Division 

• Reviewed and approved site plans for the new elementary and middle schools at Cross Street 
and High Plain Road. 

• Conducted six successful downtown focus group meetings including the first meeting of 
downtown landlords and Town officials. 

• Selected consultant and commenced work on Essex Street Corridor Study and Dascomb 
Road intersection and signal study. 

• Made significant progress in establishing the Town-wide GIS system. 

MEMORIAL HALL LIBRARY 

Staff provided eight courses for the community on using the Internet and other electric 
resources. Approximately 20,000 individuals signed up to use the Internet and word 
processing software. 

• The Library's in-house network was enhanced with better access to MVLC's web-based 
catalog. The Library's web page was redesigned to provide enhanced remote access to 
library services. 

The Library and Friends attracted over 7,950 people to book discussion groups, concerts and 
other special programs. 

• The Children's Room welcomed 12,121 children to 371 programs including story hours, 

-10- 



clubs, films, concerts, plays and other events. Special efforts were made to develop 
collections in the area of social studies and science in response to new school curriculum 
guidelines. 

FINANCE DEPARTMENT 

Maintained Aal bond rating from Moody's Investors Service, the second highest rating 
available for municipal governments. 

• 

• Bruce Symmes was appointed as Chief Assessor for the Town. Mr. Symmes was recognized 
iri the Summer of 1999 by Banker and Tradesman as one of 125 leaders making a difference 
in Massachusetts. 

• Recognition of Elaine Shola, Purchasing Agent, as one of the first group of public 
purchasing officials to be awarded a Massachusetts Certified Public Purchasing Official 
designation under the Inspector General's certification program. 

• Completed implementation of a new Financial Management System including payroll, 
accounts payable and general ledger accounting. 

TOWN CLERK 

• Successfully conducted one Town election and one Annual Town Meeting. 

• Developed a business certification program for the office computers to replace a program 
that remained on the main frame computer. 

• Computerized all vital record forms to allow for the printing of all vital requests. 

• The record retention program was computerized to run reports of each department ' s stored 
records and provide for an orderly record disposal program. 

VETERANS SERVICES 

• Placed over three hundred Andover veterans on the VA drug prescription plan thus saving 
well over $100,000 in prescription costs. 

Recovered and refurbished the Town's Grand Army of the Republic Cannon which was 
given to the Town in 1883. It was fired on Memorial Day, July 4 th , Veteran's Day and to 
mark the Millennium observances. 

• Produced three highly successful band concerts with a total attendance of over three 
thousand persons. 

• Planned and coordinated military funerals with local veterans and area military units as 
requested by the families of veterans. 

-11- 



PLANT AND FACILITIES 

• Schematic Designs were completed for the following proposed projects: Public Safety 
Center, Middle and Elementary Schools and the Essex Sand and Gravel Pit sports fields. 
Site remediation work was completed and off-site improvements initiated to support the new 
Public Safety Center. 

• Structural evaluation and schematic drawings were completed for the proposed Senior 
Center at Williams Hall on the Phillips Academy campus. 

• Implemented many School Capital Improvement projects including: major HVAC upgrades 
at the Doherty Middle School, Bancroft School and West Elementary School; new windows 
installed at the Bancroft School, Doherty Middle School and the High School; new roof on 
the School Administration Building; paving of the parking lot and roadway at the Doherty 
Middle School; field irrigation systems; ADA improvements at Town and School buildings; 
carpeting, flooring and a new gym floor at the Shawsheen School and bleachers and fence 
at Andover High School Lovely Field. 

• Implemented the Town Capital Improvement projects including: building addition and 
parking lot paving at the Red Spring Road facility; roof replacement at the Memorial Hall 
Library; Community Skate Park, HVAC improvements to Town Offices; new carpeting at 
the Memorial Hall Library, Town House and Town Offices; demolition of 1 9 Pearson Street 
and Spring Grove Cemetery drainage project. 

• Implemented a new Arbor Day program, expanded tree planting and maintenance program 
and improved field irrigation and maintenance program. 

• Jack O'Donnell, Superintendent of Parks, Grounds, Cemetery & Forestry, achieved the 
status of Certified Arborist by the Massachusetts Arborist Association. Joseph Piantedosi 
achieved the status of Massachusetts Certified Public Purchasing Official from the Inspector 
General's Certification Program. 

TOWN ACCOUNTANT 

Began multiple year implementation of the new Financial Management Software system as 
follows: 

• Completely restructured chart of accounts; 

• Instituted new payroll system; and 

• Instituted new accounts payable system. 

• Established funding mechanism for payments of benefits to employees as they retire. 
Obtained a $300,000 appropriation at the Annual Town Meeting to reduce the Town's 
liability. 

• Accelerated retirement funding schedule resulting in the retirement system being fully 

-12- 



funded ten years earlier. 

• Created various brochures and conducted seminars to assist employees in understanding 
their retirement benefits and updated the beneficiary files of all retirees. 

• Andover Contributory Retirement Board was commended for exemplary operation by the 
Public Employees Retirement Administration Commission. 

HUMAN RESOURCES 

Completion of the pay and classification project. All positions within Town government 
were given new up-dated job descriptions as well as a revised grade classification. 
Concomitant with the work on the classification plan was the completion of a wage and 
salary survey for the positions within the plan. 

• Extensive accessibility audits and corrective measures were done on the Shawsheen School, 
Andover High School, West Middle School and the Town's election polling sites. 

• Facilitated an extensive management-training program for management personnel and staff. 
This training included work with the Myers-Briggs Personal Style Inventory and assessment 
of each participants' management and communication styles. 

• Ninety school-related hires over the summer months; most notable were an interim High 
School Principal, an Assistant Director of Pupil Personnel and a special education program 
for the high school. Most notable among the Town hires were an Assessor, a Director of 
Public Works and a Construction Project Manager to oversee major building projects. 

• Re-certification of 95% of the public school teachers in accordance with the requirements 
of the Education Reform Act; participation in extensive training in interest-based collective 
bargaining; and the inoculation of Parks and Ground Division employees against Lyme 
disease. 

BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

• Endorsed a policy for the Use of Non-Motorized Transportation. 

• Voted to re-appoint the Town Manager for another five-year term. 
Reduced the Real Estate Tax Classification shift from 1 .3% to 1 .26%. 

• Approved a thirty-year lease agreement between the Town and Phillips Academy for the use 
of Williams Hall as a Senior Citizens Center. 



■13- 



FINANCE & BUDGET DEPARTMENT 

The mission of the Finance Department is to build and reinforce confidence in Town 
financial management by managing and planning all financial functions in an efficient, cost effective 
and responsive manner, and, through a collaboration of team efforts, provide departments and the 
public with the necessary information to assure accuracy, accountability and justification. 



FINANCE ADMINISTRATION 

The Town Manager's Recommended Fiscal Year 2000 Budget was released on February 5, 
1999. During the months of February, March, and April more than 20 meetings were held with the 
Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee and department heads to review the budget and warrant 
article requests and prepare recommendations for the Annual Town Meeting. 

On April 14, 1999 the Finance Committee Report was mailed to over 1 1,300 households. 
The Annual Town Meeting began on April 25, 1999 and the Fiscal Year 2000 operating budget 
(Article 4) was adopted in the amount of $87,158,741 . This budget was an increase of 9% from the 
fiscal year 1999 operating budget of $79,932,208. 

Some of the major accomplishments for 1999 follow: 

• Town and School staff continued to work on implementing the new finance and accounting 
software system for payroll accounts payable, revenue and general ledger. 

• With the approval of the Board of Selectmen, the Department prepared a bond issue of 
$4,375,000 for various capital projects. Moody's Investors Service continued Andover's 
Aal bond rating (the second highest rating possible). Only 1 7 Massachusetts municipalities 
have a bond rating of Aal or higher. The lowest competition bid on the bond issue was 
awarded at an interest rate of 4.55%. 

• The Department coordinated the successful interdepartmental Y2K Compliance project. 

• Town's web site: www.town.andover.ma.us was expanded. New material included 1999 
Town Meeting Warrant and Recommended Budget; Board of Selectmen and staff e-mail 
addresses; 1999 Town Meeting results, Rogers Brook/South Main sewer plans, Town 
recycling calendar, DPW Annual Water Quality Report and the Community Services course 
catalogue. 

• Bruce Symmes was hired as the Town's Chief Assessor upon the resignation of William 
Krajeski, who left to pursue a career in the private sector. Mr. Symmes was recognized by 
Bankers and Tradesman during the Summer as one of 125 Massachusetts professionals at 
the annual "Leaders Making a Difference" ceremony. 



•14- 



ASSESSOR 

The Board of Assessors is responsible for the valuation of all real estate and personal 
property items in the Town. The Board hears appeals in these two categories along with motor 
vehicle excise. The Assessors are also responsible for the awarding of nearly 350 property tax 
exemptions on an annual basis. Major exemption groups include senior citizens, disabled veterans, 
widows and widowers, and individuals classified as blind. 

The Board of Assessors also conducts revaluations of all property on a triennial (every three 
years) basis. Fiscal Year 2000 was the revaluation year. The Board is responsible for meeting all 
Massachusetts Department of Revenue guidelines for property valuations, reporting of valuations 
and tax billing. 

The Assessor ' s Division gathers vast amounts of property and ownership related information 
that is available to the general public. Total valuations are now available on the Town's web site. 
More than 1,000 requests for public records and information are received and processed on an 
annual basis. 

CENTRAL PURCHASING 

In 1 999 the Central Purchasing Division processed approximately 1,125 purchase orders and 
6,957 requests for payment for the Town, and 3,969 purchase orders for the School Department. 
During this period there were approximately 72 bids and 1 1 requests for proposals which were 
advertised and officially opened. The continued utilization of the State bid contracts available to 
cities and towns has provided numerous benefits to the taxpayers of Andover. 

Throughout 1 999 Andover has initiated a number of Cooperative Bids as well as participated 
in a number of these bids with other communities. Under Massachusetts General Laws, two or more 
political subdivisions may jointly purchase goods or services through the bidding process. Some 
of the items purchased were: paper products for copy machines, Police vehicles, road salt, 
chemicals, fuel oils, vehicle fuels, elevator services, electrical services, office supplies, equipment 
and furniture, and school athletic and student voluntary insurance. 

Some of the major requests for proposals and bids solicited in 1999 were: 

• Window Replacement at the Doherty Middle School, Bancroft School and Andover High 

School 

Sewerage and Drainage Work Improvements (Brook Street, Chestnut Street & River Street) 

Ventilation of crawl spaces at the Doherty Middle School 

Second Floor Unit Ventilator Replacement at the Bancroft School 

Unit Ventilator Replacement at West Elementary School 

Installation of Playground Equipment and Surfacing at the Lower Shawsheen Park 

Sewer Extension at West Elementary School - Beacon Street 

Replacement of the Bancroft School Wheelchair Lifts 

Old Gymnasium Heating and Ventilating System Improvements at West Elementary School 

Design and Construction Administration Services for two schools 

-15- 



Architectural and Engineering Services for proposed Senior Center at Williams Hall, Phillips 

Academy 

Environmental/Asbestos Consulting Services for Town and School Buildings 

School Bus Transportation 

Installation of Irrigation System at two fields at Andover High School 

Installation of Rubber Sports Flooring at the Shawsheen School Gym 

Fire Utility Vehicle 

Miscellaneous Road Materials 

Installation of Bleacher Kick Plates and Planks at Lovely Field, Andover High School 

Doherty School Basement Asbestos Abatement 

Asbestos, Duct Cleaning and Lead Removal at various Town locations 

Lease or Purchase of a Digital Recording System for Andover Police Department 

Boiler Feed Unit Replacement at West Middle School 

Removal and Replacement of Roofing at the Memorial Hall Library and the Town Offices 

Maintenance Service for Dynac Scada System at the Water Treatment Plant 

Master Plan Study of the Lewis Street DPW Yard 

Essex Gravel Pit Fields Preliminary Design and Engineering Services 

The Office of Central Purchasing is also responsible for administering the contract 
compliance of Andover' s Affirmative Action Plan as well as the insurance coordination and risk 
management for all Town and School Departments. Health and personal insurance, however, are 
handled by the Human Resources Department. Central Purchasing handled approximately 35 
casualty and property claims over the year with 25 of these claims resulting in $64,591.17 being 
recovered for the Town. 

COLLECTOR/TREASURER 

The Collector/Treasurer's Division is responsible for the collection, investment and 
disbursement of all Town monies. Some of the highlights for 1999 are as follows: 

• Collected and processed several old outstanding tax title accounts. 

Significant time was spent, as in previous years, on tax titles and foreclosure proceedings. 

• Successfully processed over 50,000 real estate and personal property bills and payments as 
well as 30,000 excise tax bills and payments. 

Borrowed $4,375,000 at a low rate of 4.55%. 

• Helped to maintain Andover' s high bond rating of Aal . 

• Treasurer passed certification for becoming a Certified Massachusetts Municipal Tax 
Collector. 

• Finalized plans for Y2K readiness. 

-16- 



• Implemented new payroll and revenue systems, which occupied a lot of time testing, 
proving, and reviewing procedures and reports to assure a smooth transition from 1998 
through 1999. 

Dollars for Scholars is a national non-profit organization that formed an Andover chapter 
in 1997 with the acceptance of Article 27 at the 1997 annual Town Meeting. During 1999 several 
fund raising events were held and donations received from many Andover residents that resulted in 
38 scholarships awarded in the amount of $40,900 to deserving Andover students pursuing their 
further education. 

Balance as of January 1 , 1 999 $50, 146 

Income - Donations, Gifts 69,036 

Expenses - Scholarships 42.197 

Balance as of December 3 1 , 1 999 -$76,985 

INFORMATION SYSTEMS 

The Information Systems Division is responsible for hardware, software and computerized 
data used in municipal operations including financial records, word processing documents, 
electronic transmission and other varied electronic files. This Division supports all users of the 
network and strives to meet the many diversified needs of town government administration. 

Highlights for 1999 include: 

• Successfully addressed all Y2K compliance issues for December 31, 1999. 

• Completed the installation of the wide-area network, adding four new sites during 1 999, for 
a total of 10 municipal buildings connected. The wide network allows sharing of data, 
access to separate computer systems, and provides email and Internet capability. 

• Implemented new Financial Management software modules including Payroll/Personnel, 
Accounts Payable, General Ledger. 

• Continued to assist with Town Web site improvements as well as the implementation of the 
new Government Bulletin Board on Channel 22. 



■17- 



TAX RATE RECAP 












FY1997 


FY1998 


FY1999 


FY2000 


EXPENDITURES 










Appropriations & Articles 


$71,609,767 


$75,772,606 


$84,013,091 


$90,543,749 


Other Local Expenditures: 










Tax Title Purposes 


40,000 


40,000 


40,000 


5,000 


Final Court Judgements 


115,000 











Overlay/ Other Deficits 


1,135,896 


588,013 


222,026 


134,632 


Revenue Offsets/Cherry Sheet 


68.758 


64.552 


60,847 


71.235 


Total Local Expenditures 


1,359,654 


692,565 


322,873 


210,867 


State and County Charges 


999,101 


1,020,557 


953,160 


978,837 


Overlay Reserve for Abatements 


819.112 


926.191 


916.444 


915.104 


TOTAL EXPENDITURES 


$74,787,634 


$78,411,919 


$86,205,568 


$92,648,557 


EST. RECEIPTS & OTHER REVENUE 










Estimated Receipts from State: 










Cherry Sheet Estimated Receipts 


$5,713,130 


$7,794,113 


$8,508,402 


$9,473,948 


Cherry Sheet Estimated Charges 


39.631 


5,837 


5.390 


fi 


Total from State 


5,752,761 


7,799,950 


8,513,792 


9,473,948 


Estimated Local Receipts: 










Local Estimated Receipts 


5,032,000 


5,945,000 


6,281,000 


7,136,000 


Offset Receipts 


699,000 


980,451 


1,181,725 


1,154,247 


Enterprise Funds 


7,653,620 


7,726,937 


8,001,185 


8,754,691 


Revolving Funds (53e 1/2) 


400.000 


0. 


0. 





Total Local Receipts 


13,784,620 


14,652,388 


15,463,910 


17,044,938 


Free Cash and Other Revenue: 










Free Cash - Articles 


715,834 


465,645 


1,828,435 


2,947,008 


Other Available Funds 


369.133 


233.732 


2.017.957 


239.560 


Total Other Appropriations 


1,084,967 


699,377 


3,846,392 


3,186,568 


Free Cash - Operating Budget 


1,500,000 


300,000 


300,000 


1,204,000 


Total Estimated Receipts 


22,122,348 


23,451,715 


28,124,094 


30,909,454 


Total Property Taxes 


52,665,286 


54.960.204 


58.081.474 


61.739.103 


TOTAL REVENUES 


$74,787,634 


$78,411,919 


$86,205,568 


$92,648,557 


VALUATIONS AND 










TAX RATES 












FY1997 


FY1998 


FY1999 


FY2000 


TOTAL VALUATION (IN THOUSANDS) 


$3,091,930 


$3,156,121 


$3,472,883 


$3,867,601 


RESIDENTIAL TAX RATE 


15.48 


15.82 


15.17 


14.65 


COMM, IND, PER PROP TAX RATE 


22.57 


22.90 


21.74 


20.11 


EQUALIZED TAX RATE 


17.03 


17.41 


16.72 


15.96 



-18- 



WATER AND SEWER ENTERPRISE FUNDS 

Statement of Revenues, Expense and Changes in Fund Equity 
Fiscal Year Ended June 30, 1999 



Water Enterprise 



Sewer Enterprise 



OPERATING REVENUES 

Charges for Services 



$6,095,523 



$2,267,539 



OPERATING EXPENSES 

Cost of Services and Administration 

Debt Service-Principal 

Debt Service-Interest 

TOTAL OPERATING EXPENSES 



2,323,433 

1,680,750 

628.330 

4,632,513 



1,210,777 
374,350 
183.681 

1,768,808 



OPERATING INCOME (LOSS) 



1,463,010 



498,731 



NONOPERATING REVENUES 

Intergovernmental 

Investment Income 

TOTAL NON-OPERATING REVENUES 




77.959 
77,959 



7,809 
29.316 
37,125 



NET INCOME BEFORE TRANSFERS 



1,540,969 



535,856 



OPERATING TRANSFERS 

Transfers out 

Indirect costs transfer out 

TOTAL OPERATING TRANSFERS 




(748.741) 
(748,741) 




(210.861) 
(210,861) 



NET INCOME(LOSS) 



792,228 



324,995 



RETAINED EARNINGS/FUND BALANCES 

Beginning of Fiscal Year 



$1,206,216 



$541,902 



RETAINED EARNINGS/FUND BALANCES 

End of Fiscal Year 



$1,998,444 



$866,897 



From Town of Andover Annual Audit Report for Fiscal Year ending June 30, 1999 (Powers and Sullivan, CPA) 



-19- 



WATER AND SEWER DEBT SERVICE (FY1999) 

Principal Interest 



WATER DEBT 

WATER MAINS 
TREATMENT PLANT 
ADVANCE REFUNDING 
ADVANCE REFUNDING 
WATER MAIN CONST 
WATER MAIN CONST 
BANCROFT PUMPING ST 
TREATMENT PLANT 
WATER MAIN 
BANCROFT PUMPING ST 
ADVANCE REFUNDING 
WATER IMPROVEMENTS 
ADVANCE REFUNDING 
ADVANCE REFUNDING 
WATER BONDS 
WATER MAINS 
WATER PLANNING 
WATER PLANT IMPROVEMENTS 
WATER MAINS 

FISH BROOK IMPROVEMENTS 
WATER MAIN CONSTRUCTION 
WATER PUMP ST. REPAIR 
WATER TRMT PLANT IMP 
WATER MAIN CONSTRUCTION 
WATER DIST IMPROVEMENT 
WATER DIST IMPROVEMENT 
WATER MAINS 
FISH BROOK 



ART 37, 1987 
ART1A, 1987 
ART1A, 1987 
ART1A, 1987 
ART 37, 1987 
ART 46, 1992 
ART 53, 1992 
ART 1 A, 1987 
ART 46, 1992 
ART 53, 1992 
ART 1A, 1987 
A1 5,85/1 6,85/1 A.87 
ART 1 A, 1987 
ART 1A, 1987 
ART 37, 1987 
ART 46, 1992 
ART 53, 1994 
ART 32, 1995 
ART 33, 1995 
ART 31,1995 
ART 46,1992 
ART 46,1993 
ART 32, 1995 
ART 46, 1992 
ART 24, 1996 
ART 24, 1996 
ART 61, 1998 
ART 63, 1998 



20,000.00 

155,000.00 

232,500.00 

54,250.00 

35,000.00 

180,000.00 

55,000.00 

10,000.00 

45,000.00 

65,000.00 

72,000.00 

313,000.00 

40,000.00 
14,000.00 
40,000.00 
50,000.00 
55,000.00 
25,000.00 
15,000.00 
10,000.00 
50,000.00 
25,000.00 
120,000.00 



650.00 

5,037.50 
22,552.50 

8,209.82 
11,255.00 
49,975.00 
13,997.50 

1,005.00 
10,105.00 

9,985.00 
108,475.00 

69,811.00 
23,401.00 
45,218.00 
15,119.01 

2,925.00 
17,625.00 
47,382.50 
15,175.00 

7,832.50 

6,070.00 
21,250.00 
10,025.00 
81,585.00 

5,153.75 
10,866.25 

7,643.75 



1,680,750.00 628,330.08 



SEWER DEBT 

SANITARY SEWER 
SEWER-NORTH STREET 
SEWER- NORTH STREET 
ADVANCE REFUNDING 
ADVANCE REFUNDING 
ADVANCE REFUNDING 
ADVANCE REFUNDING 
SEWER PILGRIM/PIONEER 
SEWER MAYFLOWER 
SEWER PLANS 
SEWER BROOK/CHESTNUT 
PLANS - ROGERS BROOK 
SEWER BALMORAL 
SEWER PLANS SO MAIN ST 
SEWER PLANS ROGERS BROOK 
SEWER PLANS FOREST HILLS 
SEWER CONST BEACON ST 



ART 18, 1985 
ART 33, 1989 
ART 41, 1991 
A21,84;26,85 
A21, 84/26,85 
ART 28, 1989 
ART 28, 1989 
ART 32, 1997 
ART 35, 1997 
ART 31,1998 
ART 33, 1998 
ART 34, 1998 
ART 51, 1998 
ART 31, 1998 
ART 34, 1998 
ART 20, 1999 
ART 43, 1999 -20- 



34,000.00 3,298.00 



30,000.00 7,635.00 



230,000.00 
60,350.00 

20,000.00 



85,100.00 
9,122.80 

16,973.00 
8,352.50 
6,970.00 

29,055.00 
8,231.25 
6,705.00 
2,238.75 



374,350.00 183,681.30 



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TOWN COUNSEL 

During 1999, Town Counsel made numerous appearances before State Courts and 
Administrative Boards. Formal legal opinions were researched and rendered to Town officials. 
Court challenges to decisions by the Town's boards and commissions were defended by Town 
Counsel. 

Special Town Counsel was involved in the extensive proceedings at the Energy Facilities 
Siting Board regarding the proposed power plant in Dracut. 

Town Counsel had conferences with the Town Manager and other Town officials on almost 
a daily basis. Town Counsel reviewed all Articles of the Warrant and attended all Town Meetings. 
During the period covered by this report, contracts were drawn and reviewed and numerous deeds, 
easements, releases and agreements were drafted and recorded. ~~ 

Town Meeting adopted a comprehensive general bylaw to protect the wetlands, related water 
resources and adjoining land areas in the Town by controlling activities likely to have a significant 
or cumulative effect upon the important public values of those areas. 



-23- 



TOWN CLERK 

The mission of the Town Clerk's Office is to uphold the integrity of the Town 's democratic 
process, to maintain and preserve public records and to act in the best interest of the community and 
the State by providing innovative, efficient, quality services. 



The Town Clerk's Office continued to implement the computerization of its functions in 
1999. Completed were the processing of vital requests, the management of the record storage 
program for departments in the Town Offices and business certificates. The Office continued to 
work on the reorganization of the Town Offices vault and a computerized inventory of its contents. 

In 1999, the Town Clerk's Office assumed the responsibility of the management of the 
Government Channel on cable television. The Office will be responsible for providing the Town's 
cable viewers with the important communications concerning governmental functions and 
committee information. 



DEPARTMENT STATISTICS : 

The Town Census was mailed to 1 1 , 1 68 households in January, 1 999. The population at the 
completion of the census was 29, 846. 

The 1999 Annual Town Election provided the following registered voter results: 



Election 

Town Election 



Date 



No. of Voters 

2,424 



% of Voters 

13% 



March 23 
The year ended with 18,733 registered voters and was divided into eight precincts as follows: 



Precinct 1: 2,080 
Precinct 2: 2,430 
Precinct 3: 2,165 



Precinct 4: 2,350 
Precinct 5: 2,585 
Precinct 6: 2,449 



Precinct 7: 2,235 
Precinct 8: 2,439 



1997 



1998 



1999 



Births Recorded: 


341 


345 


327 


Marriages Recorded: 


189 


174 


177 


Deaths Recorded: 


251 


258 


261 


Dog Licenses Sold: 


2204 


2041 


2147 


Fishing & Hunting Licenses Sold: 


630 


560 


454 


Business Certificates Filed: 


126 


112 


148 


Uniform Commercial Code Filings: 


462 


514 


594 


Registered Voters: 


991 


1689 


1348 



-24- 



MONIES COLLECTED: 





1997 


1998 


1999 


Marriage Licenses 


2,850.00 


2,655.00 


2,670.00 


Certified Copies: 


10,851.00 


11,313.50 


10,619.50 


Uniform Commercial Code Filings: 


6,249.32 


5,861.00 


7,032.00 


Miscellaneous License Income: 


11,250.00 


11,955.00 


12,615.00 


Liquor Licenses Income: 


97,905.00 


97,345.00 


101,025.00 


Business Certificate Filings: 


3,045.00 


2,630.00 


3,605.00 


Miscellaneous Income: 


5,829.05 


6,108.55 


4,845.40 


Dog Licenses: 


17,954.00 


14,469.00 


18,911.00 


Non-Criminal Violations: 


1,925.00 


790.00 


720.00 


Copies of Public Records: 


105.80 


543.20 


315.30 


Fishing & Hunting Licenses: 


13.479.55 * 


12.880.20** 11.271.75= 


TOTAL MONIES COLLECTED: 


$171,443.72 


$166,550.45 


$173,629.95 



** 



$13,247.75 in fees were sent to the State Division of Fisheries and Wildlife and $23 1 .80 was 
retained by the Town of Andover. 

$ 12,658.75 in fees were sent to the State Division of Fisheries and Wildlife and $22 1 .45 was 
retained by the Town of Andover. 

*** $1 1,079.00 in fees were sent to the State Division of Fisheries and Wildlife and $192.75 was 
retained by the Town of Andover. 



-25- 



COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT & PLANNING 

BUILDING DIVISION 

The Building Division 's mission is to ensure the health, safety and welfare of the Town 's 
residents and visitors, as well as to protect the value of the historic district and historic structures 
in the Town through the enforcement of State and local laws, by-laws and regulations. 

The Building Division is charged with the enforcement of The Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts Building Code, 780 CMR, Architectural Access Board Rules and Regulations, 521 
CMR, The Zoning Act, Chapter 40A of the Massachusetts General Laws, the Andover Zoning 
Bylaw, Article VIII, Section 33, Demolition of Historically Significant Buildings, Section 36, 
Ballard Vale Historic District Bylaw and Section 37, Chimneys, of Article XII of the Town of 
Andover Code of Bylaws, as well as other applicable Town and State laws and regulations. The 
Building Division reviews all documentation (plans and specifications) submitted with applications 
for permits and issues all permits required for construction and other applicable activities for which 
permits are required by law. The Division performs all required site inspections as well as Code 
mandated safety inspections. The Building Division responds to customer inquiries, complaints and 
emergencies. Finally, the Building Division assists other Divisions of the Department of 
Community Development and Planning, as needed, in their permit processing and enforcement and 
attends, when necessary, Zoning Board of Appeals, Planning Board and other Commission 
meetings. 

BUILDING DIVISION STATISTICAL INFORMATION 





1997 


1998 


1999 


New Dwellings 


78 


68 


55 


Additions/Alterations to Single 








Family Dwellings 


722 


699 


715 


New Multi-Family Dwellings 





1 


4 


Additions/ Alterations to Multi- 








Family Dwellings 


12 


13 


21 


New Commercial & 








Industrial Buildings 


8 


1 


11 


Additions/Alterations to 








Commercial and Industrial 








Buildings 


132 


138 


128 


Schools/Public Buildings 


42 


32 


36 


Swimming Pools 


29 


26 


25 


Signs, Chimneys, 








Woodburning Stoves, 








Raze Permits 


134 


128 


166 


Certificates of Inspection 


21 


35 


21 


Total Fees Collected 


$658,594 


$458,506 


$760,895 


Total Estimated Value 


$89,706,007 


$59,998,444 


$101,562,600 



ELECTRICAL 

The purpose of the Massachusetts Electrical Code is safeguarding the general public and 
property from the hazards arising from the use of electricity. The Electrical Inspector is responsible 
for reviewing and granting permits and scheduling inspections on a daily basis for residential, 
commercial and industrial jobs, assisting the Police and Fire Departments in the investigation of 
accidents and fires. Electrical work includes, but is not limited to, wiring for lighting, power, fire 
alarms, security alarms, telephone and other similar devices, installation of equipment for 
emergency power, generators, transformers, switch gear equipment, panel boards and similar 
equipment. The Electrical Inspector also reviews violations of the Electrical Code and inspects the 
corrective work for protection of the users and cooperates with the various electric companies that 
service the area. 



1997 



1998 



1999 



Electrical Permits 
Fees Collected 



1,137 
$78,285 



1,178 
$66,244 



1,238 
$109,699 



PLUMBING AND GAS FITTING 

All plumbing and gas fitting installations are controlled through enforcement of the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts State Uniform Plumbing and Gas Code, formulated by the Board 
of State Examiners of Plumbers and Gas Fitters under Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 142. 

The Plumbing and Gas Inspector issues permits for the installation of gas piping, plumbing 
and sewer installations and repairs. Inspections are conduced as necessary to ensure compliance 
with State Codes. Complaints and violations are also investigated and corrected or reported to the 
proper authorities. 



1997 



1998 



1999 



Plumbing Permits 


767 


850 


786 


Fees Collected 


$38,707 


$32,443 


$41,648 


Gas Fitting Permits 


510 


605 


508 


Fees Collected 


$14,706 


$13,810 


$13,334 


ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 









The Andover Zoning Board of Appeals is authorized to function under the General Laws of 
the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Chapter 40A, applicable sections of Chapter 40B and the 
Town Zoning Bylaw. The Board meets on the first Thursday of each month in Memorial Hall at the 
Memorial Hall Library, Elm Square. Five regular members and four associate members are 
appointed by the Board of Selectmen. The public hearings by the Board are the result of 
applications in the following areas: 



A variance from the requirements of the Zoning Bylaw; 

-27- 



• A special permit under the Zoning Bylaw; 

A person aggrieved by the decision of the Inspector of Buildings or other Administrative 
official; or 

• Permission to construct low or moderate income housing within the Town of Andover 
(Comprehensive Permit). 

Prior to the hearings, applications are reviewed and pertinent plans and sketches are 
requested, legal advertisements are published and abutters are notified as required by law. The 
public hearings are conducted by the Chairman in conformity with the Board of Appeals Rules and 
Regulations. Following the hearings, the members of the Board, when deemed necessary, view each 
property in question and hold a deliberation meeting thereafter. Based on the evidence presented 
at the hearing, and the applicable laws, a decision is rendered, signed and filed with the Town Clerk 
and the Registry of Deeds. 



1997 



1998 



1999 



Number of Regular Meetings 


13 


13 


12 


Deliberation Meetings 




13 


16 


14 


Petitions Filed 




122/128* 


110/120* 


115/122* 


Petitions Granted 




101 


103 


92 


Petitions Denied 




17 


15 


17 


Petitions Withdrawn or 


Dismissed 


10 


10 


13 


Fees Collected 




$15,494 


$19,075 


$12,832 



Some petitions contained requests for both variances and special permits. 



-28- 



BUILDING DIVISION STATISTICS 



SINGLE FAMILY 
ADDITIONS & ALTERATIONS 



750 
700 
650 
600 
550 
500 
450 
400 



1991 




1993 



1995 



1997 



1999 



160 



140 



120 



100 



80 



60 



40 



1991 



SINGLE FAMILY 
NEW DWELLINGS 




1993 



1995 



1997 1999 



1996 



PERMIT FEES 




1997 



1998 



1999 





BUILDING PERMITS 




1,300 
1,200 
1,100 
1,000 
900 
800 






_ - 


s *^s/ ^»-* 












1991 1993 1995 1997 1999 





-29- 



CONSERVATION DIVISION 



The mission of the Conservation Commission is to protect Andover 's natural resources and 
to act as trustees in perpetuity of the Town 's conservation land. 

In 1999, the Conservation Commission acquired approximately 59 acres of land for 
conservation purposes. Approximately 1 ,728 acres of land are under the control and custody of the 
Commission for conservation purposes. 



1997 



Conservation Commission Meetings 

Pre-filing Conferences 

Public Hearings & Meetings 

Abbreviated Notices of Resource Area Delineation 

Orders of Conditions Issued 

Amended Orders of Conditions Issued 

Certificates of Compliance Issued 

Determinations of Applicability Issued 

Notification of Satisfactory Completion of Work 2 1 

Findings of Significance Issued 

Enforcement Orders Issued 

Emergency Certifications 

Acres of Conservation Land Acquired 

Conservation Restrictions Established 

Wetland Filing Fees Collected 

Expenditures from Conservation Fund 



1998 



1999 



24 


22 


26 

25 


339 


374 


266 
6 


30 


40 


25 


6 


7 


6 


36 


23 


57 


168 


153 


113 


21 


44 


34 


34 


68 


55 


8 


9 


4 


4 


6 


8 


60 


8.5 


59 


1 








$13,217 


$14,389 


$8,618 


$1,360,000 





$14,000 



-30- 



HEALTH DIVISION 

The mission of the Andover Board of Health is to promote and protect the public health 
including the physical, mental, emotional and social wellness of all the people. 

The Health Division encompasses all phases of health administration, including planning, 
evaluation, budgeting, enforcement, inspection and pseudo adjudicatory proceedings. The 
Sanitarians supervise the inspection and public health education programs in matters dealing with 
State Sanitary Code and the State Environmental Code. The Public Health Nurse is primarily 
responsible for all medical clinical administrative matters. The Director of Public Health assumes 
primary responsibility for coordination among the various boards in permit granting and proper land 
use, specifically in the area of environmental protection issues (i.e. septic system design, wetland 
pollution, water quality protection). The Director designs programs and implements policies as 
proposed by the Andover Board of Health to meet the health needs of the community. The Board 
of Health consists of three volunteer members appointed by the Town Manager for staggered three 
year terms. 

ACTIVITY REPORT 



Board of Health Meetings 
Plan Reviews 
Restaurant Inspections 
Complaints & Investigations 
Administrative Hearings 
Court Actions 
Fees Collected 



Outreach Clinics 
Attendance 

Senior Center Clinics 
Attendance 

Office Visits 
Home Visits 

Influenza Immunization 
Pneumonia Immunization 

Cholesterol Screening Clinics 
Attendance 

Glucose Screening Clinics 
Attendance 



1997 


1998 


1999 


12 


11 


12 


312 


287 


168 


290 


232 


203 


283 


245 


147 


2 


6 


3 


2 


4 


3 


$71,907 


$95,162 


$80,101 


CLINIC REPORT 






1997 


1998 


1999 


33 


34 


27 


351 


372 


334 


47 


50 


51 


699 


687 


868 


243 


99 


120 


5 


4 


9 


1269 


1324 


1650 


32 


51 


83 


9 


9 


9 


131 


120 


100 


1 








6 









-31- 



CLINIC REPORT (Continued) 
1997 



1998 



Mantoux Tuberculin testing Attendance 

Positive Reactor Follow Up 

T.B. Clinic Case History, Appointments & Follow Up 



Hepatitis B Immunization Clinics - Hepatitis B Vaccine 
Doherty Middle School 
West Middle School 
Andover High School 



Total 



911 572 

NON-COMMUNICABLE REPORTABLE DISEASES 

1997 1998 



Other Mycobacterium 

*A Typical Mycobacteria Avium 



*1 



COMMUNICABLE DISEASES 



Animal Bites 

Chicken Pox 

Campylobacter 

Cyclospora 

E.coli0157.H7 

Giardia 

Hepatitis A 

Hepatitis B 

Hepatitis C 

Lyme Disease 

Pertussis 

Measles (Rubeola) 

Meningitis (Bacterial) 

Meningitis (Viral) 

Salmonella 

Shigella 

Strep Pneumonia 

Tuberculosis 

Legionella 

Yersinia Entercolitica 



1997 1998 



1999 



117 


96 


99 


41 


13 


12 


16 


9 


10 


499 


265 


193 


412 


218 


167 


- 


89 


84 



444 



1999 



1999 



38 


33 


21 


142 


15 


7 


3 


7 


3 


1 











1 


1 





3 


13 








2 


4 


5 


4 





1 


5 


2 


3 


2 


1 


3 


3 


7 











4 





4 


4 





7 


4 


4 








1 





1 


1 


1 











1 








1 






-32- 



HEALTHY COMMUNITIES TOBACCO AWARENESS PROGRAM 

The mission of the Healthy Communities Tobacco Awareness Program is to educate 
community residents about the health risks of smoking; eliminate youth access to tobacco; promote 
the health of residents, particularly children, by reducing public exposure to secondhand smoke; 
and provide free quit smoking classes. 



The Healthy Communities Tobacco Awareness Program is a collaborative program between 
the Andover Board of Health and the Boards of Health in five other communities (Dracut, Methuen, 
Middletoh, North Andover and Topsfield). The Program works to promote and enforce policies 
and regulations to protect the public from exposure to environmental tobacco smoke, promote and 
enforce regulations to eliminate youth access to tobacco products, educate the community about the 
health risks of smoking and help smokers quit smoking. 

The Program staff, which consists of a Program Director and two Health Educators, conducts 
enforcement activities, provides technical assistance around policy development and 
implementation, conducts public education and outreach activities, and facilitates free smokign 
cessation groups in community settings and in worksites. The Program is funded by the 
Massachusetts Department of Public Health's Tobacco Control Program with the 25 cent excise tax 
on cigarettes. Since the inception of the Massachusetts Tobacco Control Program in 1992, statistics 
show the program is achieving success in reducing its goals. 

• Adult smoking prevalence in Massachusetts has declined by 22.6% to 19.1% since the 
program began, resulting in 150,000 fewer smokers in the state. 

• Overall cigarette consumption in Massachusetts has declined by 30% since 1 992, compared 
to a decrease of just 8 percent in the rest of the country (excluding California). 

Those who smoke in Massachusetts are smoking less. The proportion of smokers who 
smoke 15 or more cigarettes per day declined from 69% in 1993 to 59% in 1999. 

• Among Massachusetts smokers who try to quit, the success rate has increased from 17.1% 
in 1993 to 24% in 1999. 

• 30% of Massachusetts youth report recent smoking (within the last 30 days). This rate as 
remained constant while youth rates have increased dramatically throughout the country. 

Enforcement of Regulations Restricting the Sale of Tobacco Products to Minors 

The following is an overview of monitoring activities by Healthy Communities Tobacco 
Awareness Program throughout the six communities of its service area to ensure that retailers are 
not selling tobacco products to minors. 



-33- 





January 
1998 


June 1998 


Fall 1998 


Winter 
1999 


Summer 
1999 


Fall 1999 


# Vendors 
Inspected 


114 


114 


76 


75 


95 


106 


# Illegal 
Sales 


1 





11 


9 


3 


9 


Compliance 
Rate 


99% 


100% 


86% 


88% 


97% 


92% 



Beginning in 1 999, Healthy Communities expanded the frequency of its enforcement 
activities, and these activities will be further expanded in the Spring of 2000. The Program 
has begun to issue tickets/fines for violations of youth access regulations in Andover, 
Methuen and North Andover. Healthy Communities continues to conduct outreach and 
education to all tobacco retailers in our communities. 

Quit Smoking Classes 

During 1999, Healthy Communities continued to offer smoking cessation classes at 
Holy Family Hospital in Methuen on a monthly basis. In addition, Healthy Communities 
began offering worksite cessation groups. All cessation services are provided free of charge. 

In 1999, 109 individuals who had completed smoking cessation groups at least six 
months previous were sent follow-up surveys. Survey results were as follows: 

38 individuals responded to the survey (a 34% response rate). 

• Of those who responded, 1 8 individuals reported that they are still smoke-free. If it 

is assumed all of the individuals who failed to respond to the survey are still smoking 
(which is likely an overestimate), the quit rate would be 16.5%. 



-34- 



PLANNING DIVISION 

The mission of the Planning Division is to ensure the orderly growth and development of the 
Town through sound planning practices and through the implementation of the recommendations 
of the Master Plan. 

Throughout 1999 the Planning Division continued its efforts toward downtown 
improvements and work on major transportation system projects. By the end of the year the planners 
had organized and participated in more than a half dozen public forums on the $2.5 million Main 
Street project and related downtown issues, and we continued work on transportation projects such 
as River Road, Dascomb Road, and Burtt Road. Staff also assisted in developing the scope of two 
major studies to be undertaken in year 2000; one for the 1-93 corridor in Andover and Methuen, and 
the other for improvements to the Ballardvale and Andover MBTA commuter stations. 

1999 saw the completion of the new plaza on Park Street and the occupancy of a new office 
building on the former Krinski property. The division staff continued its work on the development 
of a sophisticated Geographic Information System (GIS) which we hope will be operational by the 
end of year 2000. This system will provide the town with a significantly enhanced record keeping 
and retrieval system for our land use and infrastructure data. 

Development activities in the industrial areas, which had experienced a sharp increase in the 
previous year, had leveled off but still continued at a steady pace. 1 999 saw an increase in hotel 
development, with two new hotels in construction, one awaiting construction, and two more on the 
drawing board. 1999 also saw the construction of the Town's first multi-level parking garage at the 
Genetics Institute facility. Two additional parking garages at other industrial sites in the near future. 





1997 


1998 


1999 


Planning Board Meetings 


25 


26 


22 


Public Hearings Held 


131 


70 


96 


Definitive Subdivision Plans 


10 


7 


10 


Preliminary Subdivision Plans 


9 


6 


7 


ANR Plans 


42 


28 


35 


Site Plan Reviews 


7 


7 


1 


Special Permits issued 


36 


22 


28 


Lot Releases and Clearance 


103 


72 


80 


Certificates issued 








Warrant Articles Reported 


32 


39 


37 


Subdivision Guarantees 


$493,420 


$242,264 


$263,053 


Street Acceptances 


9 


7 


2 


Revenues Generated 


$273,554 
-35- 


$182,976 


$135,768 



PUBLIC HEALTH AND PLANNING STATISTICS 



PUBLIC HEALTH 
TOTAL CLINIC ATTENDANCE 



4,000 
3,500 
3,000 
2,500 
2,000 
1,500 
1,000 



1996 



1997 



1998 



1999 



PUBLIC HEALTH 
COMPLAINTS & INVESTIGATIONS 



300 



250 



200 



150 



100 



1996 



1997 



1998 1999 



150 



100 



50 



1996 



PLANNING BOARD 
PUBLIC HEARINGS 



1997 



1998 



50 
40 
30 
20 
10 



PLANNING DIVISION 
PLAN REVIEWS 











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1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 

•— Definitive Subdivision " G " ANR Plans 
"♦"• Preliminary Subdivision 



-36- 



PLANT & FACILITIES DEPARTMENT 

The mission of the Plant and Facilities Department is to provide responsive and cost effective 
maintenance services to all Town and School buildings, parks and grounds, vehicle maintenance, 
cemetery, forestry and other areas within their responsibility. 



The Plant and Facilities Department provides scheduled and non routine maintenance services 
to all Town and School buildings, parks and grounds, cemetery, forestry and vehicle operations. 
Additionally, the Department is responsible for the following: 

• Implementation of all major buildings and grounds capital projects including new building 
construction projects, landscape and field projects and driveway and parking areas. 
Town and School building and field rental functions and the Town House (Old Town Hall). 
Managing the Town's fuel depot. 
Spring Grove Cemetery operations. 

Compliance with environmental, health and safety regulations. 
Custodial services in all Town buildings. 
Traffic lights. 

Trash pickup at Town and School buildings. 
Town-owned street lighting. 
Town switchboard operations. 
Bald Hill leaf composting facility. 

ADMINISTRATION 

The Plant and Facilities Department is managed by a Director who is supported by three 
Superintendents, an Administrative Assistant, Construction Project Manager, Vehicle 
Maintenance Foreman, Work Control Center Coordinator, Purchasing/Inventory Coordinator, 
Accounts Payable Clerk, part time Telephone Operator/Receptionists and a diverse group of 
skilled and semi-skilled maintenance trades persons, vehicle mechanics, grounds and tree 
workers, and custodians. 

Administration's Major Accomplishments 

Major Capital Projects: 

• Schematic design completed for the new Public Safety Center, Middle and Elementary 
School, and Senior Center Projects. 

Schematic design completed for the proposed Essex Sand and Gravel Pit sport fields and 

other site improvements. 

Town Yard Space Needs study draft presented to the Selectmen. 

• Design work and off site improvements initiated in support of the Public Safety Project 
including demolition of 19 Pearson Street and site remediation work at the Public Safety 
site. 

-37- 



Support Functions: 

• New Project Manager hired to replace a vacancy. 

New Accounts Payables Clerk hired to replace a vacancy. 

• New improved project tracking system established. 

Y2K corrective actions implemented for all Plant and Facilities systems including: Energy 
management systems and controls, computerized preventive maintenance and etc. 

BUILDING MAINTENANCE AND MECHANICAL/ELECTRICAL DIVISION 

The Building Maintenance and Mechanical/Electrical Divisions are supervised by two 
superintendents and provide all maintenance services including electrical, mechanical, plumbing, 
carpentry, painting and security to all Town and School buildings which total in excess of a 1.2 
million square feet. Additionally, they provide custodial services to Town buildings, maintain 
traffic signals and exterior Town-owned light poles and manage all building-related capital projects. 

During 1999 these two divisions completed 4,381 work orders. 

1996 1997 1998 1999 



Town 


1,108 


1,325 


1,158 


1,472 


School 


1.813 


2.626 


2.552 


2.909 


Total* 


2,921 


3,951 


3,710 


4,381 



* Does not include 252 work orders that were used to track 
Town and School capital projects. 

Building Maintenance Division Accomplishments 

New exterior windows (gym windows pending) at the Doherty Middle School and Bancroft 
School. 

New ADA door hardware installed at the Bancroft School and West Middle School. 
New carpeting in the administrative offices at the South School. 
New stage curtains in the auditorium and gym at the West Elementary School. 
New carpeting in Pod B at the West Elementary School. 

Oil tank controls and other construction corrective actions completed at the Sanborn School. 
New additional windows installed in the 2 nd & 3 rd floor classroom wing at the High School. 
ADA improvements at the High School, Collins Center and Shawsheen School - electric 
door and drinking fountains. 

New carpet/tile in the main office area at the West Middle School. 
Weight room floor filled in at the West Middle School. 
All main corridors on the first level were painted at the West Middle School. 
New carpet/tile - art room, kindergarten & music room at the Shawsheen School. 
New gym floor at the Shawsheen School. 
Red Spring Road building addition to Maintenance Building. 
New roof on the School Administration Building. 

-38- 



Two new classrooms added at Doherty Middle School - cafeteria and wood shop areas. 

New vinyl tile installed in main hallway at the Bancroft School. 

Installed new bathroom doors and hardware at the High School. 

New roof installed at Memorial Hall Library - Phase II. 

New carpeting installed at the Town House, Library and Town Offices. 

Safety fence and guards installed on bleachers at Lovely Field 

Mechanical/Electrical Division Accomplishments 

New lighting - Doherty Middle School Music and Band Rooms. 

New emergency generator and emergency electrical panels - Doherty Middle School. 

Upgraded electrical receptacle in Doherty Middle School Science wing to ground fault type. 

New ventilation system installed in the Doherty Middle School basement areas. 

New unit ventilators installed on the second floor of the Bancroft School. 

Bancroft Cafeteria and Gym air handlers upgraded to direct digital controls (DDC). 

New sink added to the Science Room at the Bancroft School. 

Two new electric wheel chair lifts installed at the Bancroft School. 

Twelve new exhaust fans installed at the Bancroft School. 

New kitchen ventilation distribution system at the South School. 

South School Cafeteria stage lighting installed. 

Eleven new unit ventilators installed at West Elementary School. 

New master clock bell system installed at West Elementary School. 

New air handler in old Gym at West Elementary School. 

Fire alarm system upgrades completed at West Elementary School. 

New cafeteria and art room sinks installed at West Elementary School. 

Two computer rooms air conditioning systems installed at West Elementary School. 

Three new water coolers installed at Sanborn School. 

New lighting installed main corridors and other areas at Shawsheen School. 

Y2K compliance implemented for all Town/School facilities including HVAC controls, 

energy management system, emergency generators, elevators, etc. 

Electrical survey conducted for all Town/School buildings. 

Extensive preventive maintenance completed for all Town/School buildings. 

New variable speed drives and DDC controls installed in School Administration area. 

HVAC improvements Town Office building 

Asbestos inspection completed in all schools. 

Installed traffic signal preemption systems at three key intersections on Route 133. 

PARKS. GROUNDS. CEMETERY AND FORESTRY DIVISION 

The three Parks and Grounds Divisions (Parks and Grounds, Cemetery and Forestry) are 
independent and interdependent. They operate under the supervision of one superintendent and 
share some equipment and work together on special projects. The three divisions perform many 
tasks seemingly unrelated to their principal horticultural maintenance duties, such as providing 
support to parades and other holiday events, litter control, trash removal, recycling, flagpole 
maintenance, fence/gate/backstop repairs, drainage connections, snow removal and moving heavy 
items such as the whiskey barrels used as planters in the downtown area and building and repairing 

-39- 



park benches and tables. 

During 1999 these Divisions completed 135 work orders (Town 97 - Schools 38) totaling 
$543,774 labor and materials. 

PARKS AND GROUNDS DIVISION 

This division maintains 2.75 million square feet of ballfields and 1 .4 million square feet of lawn 
areas. Ballfields and lawns are located on all School grounds and other Town property such as 
Recreation Park, Ballardvale Playground, Upper and Lower Shawsheen, the Bowling Green, parks, 
playgrounds and designated islands, triangles and other parcels throughout the Town. Ballfields are 
prepared (groomed and lined) for all secondary school athletic events. Turf maintenance consists 
of mowing, aerating, watering, over-seeding, liming fertilizing and weed and insects control. 
Pesticide operations are conducted by trained and licensed personnel using approved pesticides and 
and application methods. This division also maintains small trees, shrubs and shrub beds on Town 
property and is responsible for snow removal at all Town buildings. 

Parks & Grounds Division Accomplishments 

High School Varsity football & baseball field irrigation systems installed. 

Shawsheen School exterior drainage project and new play field implemented. 

New fence installed at the north end of Lovely Field. 

Implemented improved athletic field maintenance program. 

Doherty School parking lot and roadway paving. 

New paving work completed Red Spring Road parking area. 

Sanborn School parking lot drainage corrections and upper field irrigation system (donated). 

Skate Park completed. 

South School play field renovations and under ground sprinklers (donated). 

West Elementary baseball infields upgraded. 

CEMETERY DIVISION 

Spring Grove Cemetery on Abbot Street is owned and operated by the Town of Andover. The 
cemetery contains approximately sixty acres and is approximately 75% developed. During 1999, 
there were 92 burials and 117 grave sites were sold. Cemetery operations and maintenance includes 
burials, mowing, trimming, turf care, pruning of shrubs and small trees, leaf pickup, town wide 
snow removal, and other tasks including grounds maintenance in Recreation Park and special 
projects at other Town facilities. 

Cemetery Division Accomplishments 

• Installation of an irrigation system at the Veteran's Memorial Park. 

• Continued improvements to the overall appearance and upkeep of the cemetery. 

• Over 1200 feet of new drainage pipe installed to correct a major drainage problem. 



-40- 



FORESTRY DIVISION 

The Forestry Division is responsible for the maintenance of all Town owned trees.. The 
majority of their time is spent pruning trees, clearing storm damage, flat clearing areas of 
undesirable vegetation and removing obstructions at intersections and curves for improved visibility. 
The Forestry Division also mows roadsides throughout the Town and maintains the Bald Hill 
compost site. 

Forestry Division Accomplishments 

Completed tree inventory for the Shawsheen and Ballardvale areas of Town. 
Completed all pruning work identified in the "Downtown Tree Inventory" report. 
Awarded a grant from Mass Relief to plant street trees. 

Coordinated the grinding and screening of compost at Bald Hill for use on athletic fields. 
Distributed 2000 Douglas Fir trees to Andover school children on Arbor Day. 
Planted 40 new Town trees plus 64 trees in support of DPW sidewalk projects. 
Responded to approximately 175 calls from Town residents for tree problems. 

VEHICLE MAINTENANCE DIVISION 

The Vehicle Maintenance Division is supervised by a working foreman and the Director of 
Plant and Facilities. This division provides maintenance to all Town vehicles and major pieces of 
equipment including fire apparatus, police cruisers, DPW trucks and equipment, Plant & Facilities 
trucks and equipment, Town wide emergency generators, and other support vehicles and coordinates 
the purchasing for new vehicles. This division processed 1398 work orders in 1999. 

Vehicle Maintenance Division Accomplishments 

• Implemented expanded preventative maintenance program. 

MUNICIPAL BUILDINGS DIVISION 

This division of the Plant and Facilities Department is responsible for scheduling and renting 
school facilities during after school hours, as well as scheduling and renting School and Town 
athletic fields, Recreation Park and the Town House function facility on Main Street. 

Schools 

The overall number of school rentals and uses during 1999 was 5,493 which is a 4% increase 
over 1998. Overall, gymnasium spaces continued to comprise the majority of the rental and 
scheduling contracts, with use of the auditoriums, cafeterias and other spaces making up the 
remainder of the scheduled uses. Figures below do not include rentals or uses of the Andover High 
School athletic fields, gymnasium, field house or Collins Center, which are all scheduled through 
the School Administration Offices. 



-41- 



1997 1998 1999 



Permits Issued: 


4,190 


5,264 


5,493 


Community Services/Town 


36.3% 


43.2% 


46.3% 


Private Rentals 


39.7% 


39.3% 


32.9% 


School Events 


24% 


17.5% 


20.9% 


Fields 









School and Town playing fields continued to be rented to capacity in 1999 due to the growing 
number of participants in youth and adult sports leagues. A new program was instituted in 1999 to 
"rest" one field per year. This program is needed to improve field conditions which had been 
deteriorating due to overuse. The number of field permits issued in 1 999 is lower than the prior year 
as fewer fields are available - not because of a decline in the demand for fields. In fact, the demand 
for playing fields continues to exceed capacity. 

Youth athletic leagues such as Little League and the Andover Soccer Association continued to 
comprise the majority of field rentals with scheduling for Town-sponsored recreation programs, 
Andover Junior Football League, Andover Girls Softball League and the Andover adult sports 
leagues making up the remainder of uses. Due to the great demand for field by Andover sports 
leagues, less than 1% of the total number of rentals were to private or business organizations. 

New programs such as boys and girls lacrosse sponsored by both Andover High School and 
Andover Youth Services continues to draw more participants each year. These programs and the 
increasing draw of the youth sports leagues continue to add to the existing scheduling constraints 
on Town and School fields which are booked to maximum capacity Monday through Saturday each 
week during each sports season. 

1997 1998 1999 



Permits Issued: 


2,323 


3,016 


2,706 


Youth Leagues 


81.2% 


81.8% 


81.2% 


Community Services/Youth 








Services/School 


12.5% 


14.8% 


13.4% 


Private Rentals/ Adult Leagues 


6.3% 


3.4% 


5.5% 


Rec Park 









Recreation Park is available for private rentals on weekends from April to October. During 
weekdays, the Park's softball field and tennis courts are scheduled for Community Services tennis 
classes, recreational programs and a co-ed softball league. The total number of scheduled uses was 
up 40%. A 50% increase in the number of Andover School and Town recreation department 
program at the Park account for the majority of the overall increase. Uses by private renters and 
youth sports leagues remained nearly the same. 



-42- 



1997 1998 1999 



Rentals/Uses: 


191 


166 


235 


Community Services/Town 


134 


119 


180 


Youth Leagues 


17 


9 


12 


Private Rentals 


40 


38 


33 


Old Town Hall 









The function hall at the Andover Town House has been available to municipal/school groups, 
residents and non-residents for special events since February 1990. The total number of rentals in 
1999 was up 20% from 1998. The majority of the increased use can be attributed to fifteen more 
Town and School events than last year as well as a 13% increase in the number of rentals by 
Andover residents and local non-profit groups for special events. 

1997 1998 1999 



Rentals: 


92 


70 


95 


Residents 


47 


44 


50 


School/Community 








Services/Town 


35 


24 


39 


Non-Residents 


10 


2 


6 



-43- 



PLANT & FACILITIES STATISTICS 



3,500 
3,000 
2,500 




FIELD RENTALS * 




■ 




/^ 




. ^ 




2,000 

4 cnn 






1 ,OUU 

1996 


1997 1998 1999 



SCHOOL BUILDING 
USE PERMITS 



6000 



5500 



5000 



4500 



4000 



1996 



1997 1998 1999 



* Decrease due to reduction in fields available not a reduction in demand 



WORK ORDERS 


3,500 










3,000 
2,500 






..* - " 





2,000 


....••• 




♦ 


1,500 
1,000 


rft — 










500 

n 








U i 


1996 1997 1998 1999 | 


— ■— Town ••<*■■ Vehicle 


■■■♦••■ School 



250 



200 



150 



100 



50 



GRAVE SITES 



1996 1997 1998 

— ■" Grave Sites Sold 



1999 



-44- 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS 

The mission of the Department of Public Works is to continuously improve our quality of life 
by providing the finest potable water, state-of-the-art disposal of our wastes (water and solids) and 
provide safe travel on our road network. 



ENGINEERING 

The Engineering Division prepared construction plans, cost estimates, specifications and 
bids, performed field layouts, inspections and construction supervision on projects such as: sewer 
construction on Balmoral Street, Rock O 'Dundee Road and Beacon Street north of the West 
Elementary School; the reconstruction of sidewalks on William Street, High Street, Locke Street, 
Center Street, Oak Street, Marland Street and Moraine Street; the installation and repair of storm 
drains on William Street, Poor Street, Balmoral Street and Beacon Street plus five other locations. 
Repairs were also made to the Harold Parker Road Bridge over the Skug River. The Division 
performed field surveys and designs to prepare for upcoming construction projects such as: 
Sidewalk Reconstruction on Maple Avenue, Summer Street, Andover Street, River Street and sewer 
construction on Beacon Street south of the West Elementary School. 

Preliminary work was performed with the Town's consultant for the design of the sewer 
extensions for the South Main Street /Ballardvale Road areas, Rogers Brook area and the Forest 
Hills Drive/Cross Street area. Staff members assisted and coordinated with consultants on the design 
of other projects such as the Main Street Corridor Improvements, repairs to the Hussey's Pond Dam 
and the River Street Bridge; and the construction of the Brook Street and Chestnut Street relief 
sewers and drainage improvements off River Street. Work was also performed to field locate 
various utility features to be included in the development of the Town's GIS system. 

Planning and estimating for the resurfacing of seventy Town streets was prepared this year 
while assistance was given to the Highway Division during the actual work performed on fifty-six 
of these streets. Preliminary and Definitive Subdivision Plans and Site Plans were reviewed for the 
Planning Board; checked for design conformance, traffic safety, layout and adequacy of proposed 
roads and utilities. All roads and utilities in new subdivisions such as Douglas Lane, Mortimer 
Drive, Coderre Way, Cullen Circle, Stirling Street Extension, Minuteman Park and numerous other 
sites were inspected and tested to insure compliance with Town construction standards. 
Performance Bond amounts were also calculated as requested by the Planning Board. 

Street opening permits for the installation and repair of various underground utilities, 
including many such excavations by the Bay State Gas Company, Bell Atlantic, Mass Electric and 
Media One contractors were issued through this Division and the necessary utility markouts and 
inspections were carried out. 

The Engineering Division updated the Town Assessor's maps and printed the necessary 
copies for other Town departments. The staff also provided and maintained records of various 
utilities, street excavations, residential and industrial site development, street layouts and road 

maintenance. 

-45- 



1997 



1998 



1999 



Storm Drain Design & Construction (ft.) 

Sewer Main Design & Construction (ft.) 

Sidewalk Design & Construction (ft.) 

Water Main Design & Construction (ft.) 

Guardrail Replaced/installed (ft.) 

Streets Resurfaced (miles) 

Street Opening Permits Issued & Inspected 

Sewer Connections reviewed for Board of Health 

Assessors Maps updated 

Subdivision/Site Plans reviewed (# plans / # lots) 

Performance Bonds figured for Planning Board 

Subdivision Construction Inspections/Tests: 

Water mains (ft.) 

Sewer mains (ft.) 

Drain lines (ft.) 

Sidewalks (ft.) 

Roads Paved: 

Binder coarse (ft.) 
Top coarse (ft.) 
Streets Reviewed for Town Acceptance 



2,232 


3,870 


1,180 


1,990 


2,490 


1,900 





3,970 


8,500 


20,550 


1,950 


775 





19,200 





12.3 


16.3 


10.7 


278 


198 


183 


67 


47 


50 


71 


59 


49 


26/97 


26/146 


17/51 


12 


8 


14 


18,211 


17,121 


18,314 


7,000 


6,000 


4,314 


3,421 


10,547 


6,315 


5,301 


4,370 


5,103 


5,208 


7,112 


2,069 


9,270 


6,587 


5,974 


15 


14 


9 



HIGHWAY 

The Highway Division is responsible for the road maintenance, including rebuilding and 
resurfacing, of two hundred and fifty plus miles of existing roads. During the Spring and Summer, 
two sweepers are kept busy in continuous cleaning of all streets after Winter sanding. Both 
sweepers start each morning at 5:00 A.M. The Highway Division assists the Engineering Division 
in its inspection of the conditions of new streets before they are accepted as public ways. The 
Highway Division also provides men and equipment for all other divisions when needed and is 
responsible for the maintenance and replacement of all Town drainage systems, including catch 
basins, storm drains and Town brooks. The Highway Division, with the help and cooperation of all 
other divisions of the Public Works Department and the Department of Plant & Facilities, is 
responsible for snow removal and ice control. The Division is also responsible for flood control 
for all Town roads. 



1997 



1998 



1999 



Number of streets resurfaced 

Total number of miles of road resurfaced 

Total number of feet of berms constructed 

Catch basins cleaned 

Storm drains cleaned 

Catch basins repaired 

Storm drains repaired 



37 


52 


56 


12.3 


16.3 


10.7 


1,335 


6,075 


12,115 


528 


957 


936 


12 


17 


9 


46 


31 


30 


2 


3 


1 



-46- 



SOLID WASTE 

Andover, being a member of the North East Solid Waste Committee (NESWC), has its 
refuse transported and processed at the Regional Waste-to-Energy Plant in North Andover where 
the refuse is incinerated to generate electricity. The Solid Waste Division oversees the mandatory 
curbside recycling program of newspapers/magazines, junk mail, paper board metal containers, 
glass and the voluntary drop-off program collecting #1 and #2 plastics and aluminum materials. The 
Town also maintains a leaf and grass clippings compost site on High Plain Road, near Bald Hill, 
with the compost material being available to Town residents. 



1997 



1998 



1999 



Tons of residential refuse collected 

Tons of newspapers/magazines recycled 

Tons of glass recycled 

Tons of steel/tin containers recycled 

Tons of leaves & grass clippings composted 

Tons of #1 & #2 plastics 

Tons of aluminum materials 



11,586 


11,753 


11,88 


2,300 


2,213 


2,137 


484 


431 


423 


8 


7 


7 


2,000 


2,200 


2,200 


40 


39 


47 


4 


5 


4 



WATER 

It was a record setting year for water production as the Water Division produced nearly 2.5 
billion gallons of drinking water. As noted in the award winning Andover Water Quality Report, 
the Department of Public Works has a singular mission statement and that is to provide the highest 
quality drinking water to the Town. The Division is pleased to report that the Town's water quality 
meets all Federal and State standards. In addition to the award for excellence in communication 
under the Safe Drinking Water Act, the staff scored a perfect 200 score in the Department of Public 
Health's Fluoridation Program. The Water Division maintains water treatment and the ozonation 
facility operation on an average often hours a day off peak and twenty-four hours a day during high 
demand periods. The treatment facility operates 365 days per year. Other responsibilities include 
the operation and maintenance of the Fishbrook Pumping Station, Bancroft Station and the 
Shawsheen wastewater collection system. The Division's certified laboratory monitors the treatment 
process and performance through 35,000 tests to ensure compliance with the Safe Drinking Water 
Act. 



1997 



1998 



1999 



Hydrants Repaired 

Hydrants Replaced 

Hydrants Flushed 

Water Main Breaks Repaired 

House Service Leaks Repaired 

House Services Renewed 

Water Main Taps 

New Water Meters Installed 



34 


36 


36 


1 





4 


7 


1 


2 


16 


19 


16 


30 


18 


6 


12 


3 


13 


10 


4 


11 


160 


134 


116 



-47- 



Old Water Meters Replaced 



Water Meters Repaired 

Water Shut Offs/Turn On 

Gate Boxes Adjusted 

Gallons of water treated (in millions) 

Average daily gallons pumped (in million gallons) 

Maximum day (in million gallons) 



138 


121 


132 


1997 


1998 


1999 


12 


5 


7 


224 


188 


178 


55 


46 


28 


2,074 


2,075 


2,452 


5.093 


5.004 


6.51 


10.430 


13.949 


13.430 



SEWER 

The Sewer Division is responsible for the operation and maintenance of the wastewater 
pumping stations on Dale Street in Ballardvale, Bridle Path, Osgood Street, Shawsheen Village and 
the entire system of sanitary sewers. The sewerage system includes 70 miles of sanitary sewers and 
5,062 connections. The raw sewage discharge from the Shawsheen Village Pumping Station is 
transported by means of a force main through the City of Lawrence to the Greater Lawrence 
Sanitary District's regional treatment plant for treatment. 



Sewer Main Blocks Cleared 
Sewer Main Rodded - Maintenance 
Sewer Mains Repaired 
Sewer Services Cleared 



1997 



1998 



1999 



39 


47 


28 


12 


8 


3 


5 


2 


1 


15 


13 


3 



GREATER LAWRENCE SANITARY DISTRICT 

The Greater Lawrence Sanitary District wastewater treatment facility continued to provide 
service to residential, commercial and industrial users in 1999. Since its began operation in April 
1977, the facility has treated 258 billion gallons of wastewater that was previously discharged, 
untreated, into the Merrimack River. 

The plant is currently staffed by forty-four people. The operation is continuous 24 hours per 
day and 365 days per year. The District Commission meets monthly to address policy matters. 



1997 



1998 



1999 



Andover's daily average flow to the 
Sanitary District (in millions of gallons) 



3.661 



4.322 



3.500 



-48- 



PUBLIC WORKS STATISTICS 



STREET BERM CONSTRUCTION 

14,000 




1996 



1997 



1998 



1999 



STREET RESURFACING 


15 

CO 
UJ 

I 

10 


\ ^ 




V" \ 




5 


1996 1997 1998 199S 





SOLID WASTE & RECYCLING 
COLLECTION 



CO 



14,000 

12,000 

10,000 

8,000 

g 6,000 

4,000 

2,000 





1: 



I 



1= 



1=1 



1=1=1=1 



wmzm^mJJk^ 



1 



1=1 



1 



1996 1997 1998 1999 

Refuse 

1 Newspapers / Magazines 
□ Glass 



RECYCLING DROP OFF 




1996 1997 



1998 



1999 



Plastics and Aluminum 
Leaves & Grass 



-49- 



MEMORIAL HALL LIBRARY 

The mission of the Memorial Hall Library is to make available a broad range of library 
materials, to provide up-to-date and accurate information, to offer services and programs desired 
by the community ofAndover, to act as the most convenient point of access for the needed materials 
and information, to actively seek to make community members and organizations aware of library 
resources and services, and to utilize technology and the Internet to the fullest possible extent in 
carrying out this mission. 



The Memorial Hall Library increased services to the Andover community on a number of 
fronts in 1 999. The application of technology was a particularly big issue with nearly 20,000 people 
coming to the Library specifically to use the PC's for Internet access and word processing. The 
Library used the Internet to bring services outside the walls of the building through a redesigned web 
page that provides access to remote services. Sites related to homework, health information, and 
full-text periodicals are just a few examples of the types of information that can be found through 
the web page. Memorial Hall Library's Reference Department also provides instruction in search 
the Web on both an individual basis and through courses sponsored by the Town's Department of 
Community Services. Glenda Schaake, Head of Reference, has taught these courses with her staff 
and has recently begun a series of workshops for Andover' s public school teachers to introduce them 
to the electronic resources now available to their students. 

As the statistics on the following pages show, Memorial Hall Library also continues to offer 
a wide variety of services programs that are more traditional in nature and yet are still increasing in 
their use. The Library circulated more than a half million items to the more than 350,000 people 
who came to the building. The number of people attending library programs also increased with 
more than 12,000 children and 8,000 adults attending special events such as visits by authors, 
lectures, concerts and demonstrations. The Children's Room welcomed 12,121 children to 371 
programs including story hour, clubs, films, concerts, plays and other events. Special efforts were 
made to develop collections in the areas of social studies and science in response to new curriculum 
guidelines. 

A special highlight of the year was a Native American "Pow-wow" in June that attracted 525 
adults and children. Crafts, storytelling and dancing were all events enjoyed on a bright sunny day. 
This program was one of many sponsored by the Friends of Memorial Hall Library who raise funds 
from the twice annual book sales. Over the years, the work of one special Friend, Carolyn Fantini, 
has resulted in weekly conversational English classes for people for whom English is a second 
language. These programs have been truly inspiring and educational for all who attend. 

The Circulation Department instituted several measures to increase the level of satisfaction 
of library users. First, a special collection of books entitled "Books To Go" was installed to make 
available extra copies of current popular books to fulfill demand. Books on CD were purchased to 
supplement books on tape. Finally, the Library discontinued fees for feature film videos. 



-50- 



The regional reference center for Northeast Massachusetts, Memorial Hall Library is the 
most heavily used reference and research library in this part of the state. Thousands of people either 
call or come through the Library's doors each week seeking answers to important life decisions. 
More than 300 public, school, academic and special libraries call the Reference Department in 
Andover for answers to questions asked in their libraries. In all, more than 60,000 questions were 
answered in 1999. 

The success of the Library depends upon the support of the community, the interest and 
dedication of the Library Trustees, under the leadership of Karen Herman, and the hard work of the 
Library staff and volunteers. This past year, the Trustees instituted a program of staff recognition 
that has truly helped to build morale and empower employees. We are deeply grateful for their 
support and for the support of the entire Andover community. 



CIRCULATION : 

Adult Books & Periodicals 
Children's Books & Periodicals 
Adult Non-Print 
Children's Non-Print 

TOTAL 



1997 


1998 


1999 


215,307 


215,735 


202,719 


190,558 


178,217 


176,577 


81,015 


86,192 


106,052 


23.346 


26.576 


31.273 


510,226 


507,320 


516,621 



OTHER LIBRARY STATISTICS: 



Reference Questions 
PC & Internet Sessions 
Articles Retrieved On-Line 
Programs 

Program Attendance 
Meeting Room Use 
Reserves Placed 
Interlibrary Loan Requests 
Volunteer Hours 
Web Page Visits 
Visitors to Library 



43,834 



NA 
NA 



40,327 



NA 
NA 



67,783 



7,742 


10,343 


19,368 


NA 


NA 


31,181 


402 


306 


546 


9,408 


11,171 


20,078 


439 


530 


475 


10,383 


10,118 


9,912 


4,732 


4,240 


5,058 


1,372 


2,159 


2,523 



47,888 
359,000* 



Based on a sample count for one week in October, 1999 



-51- 



LIBRARY DEPARTMENT STATISTICS 



BOOKS & PERIODICALS 




1997 1998 1999 

^ Children ■ Adult 





REFERENCE QUESTIONS 




70,000 
60,000 
50,000 
40,000 
30,000 






/ 


/ 


*—^S 








1997 1998 1999 





150,000 



NON-PRINT 
CIRCULATION 




1997 1998 1999 

^ Children ■ Adult 



PC & INTERNET USE 




1997 



1998 



1999 



-52- 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 

The mission of the Andover Police Department is to protect our future and the quality of life 
in Andover. We are empowered to protect life and property, but, with the changing times of 
increasing social programs, our agency has become more service-oriented to the community. To 
continue our mission, we all maintain an open door policy to the community, working with their 
suggestions, needs and thoughts so that we may preserve the way of life that we all enjoy in 
Andover. 



The Andover Police Department is committed to providing the highest level of public safety 
and service to the citizens and business people within the community. The members of the 
Department are empowered to enforce the laws of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and the 
Bylaws of the Town of Andover to ensure that the peace and tranquility of our neighborhoods are 
maintained and that crime and the fear of crime are reduced. We emphasize integrity, honesty, 
impartiality and professionalism from our members in order to create an environment that values 
differences and fosters fairness and flexibility in our mission. We encourage citizen input and 
interaction that will assist us in developing sound partnerships between the community and the 
police. Working together we can protect our future and enhance the quality of life for everyone 
within the Town. 

OPERATIONS DIVISION 

The total number of incidents for 1999 was up 40.7% from 1998 and up a staggering 76% 
from the year 1995. Adult arrests were up 94% from 1998 and juvenile arrests were up 39% from 
1998. There were three reported incidents of rape in 1999 while assaults were down by 6.7% for 
the same period. 

The Town experienced an 8.8% decrease in thefts from 1998 and a 36.2% decrease in stolen 
motor vehicles. The total number of housebreaks was up 14% from 1998. The Town experienced 
just one motor vehicular fatality in 1999 and the total number of motor vehicle accidents in 1999 
was down 8.0%. 

The total number of motor vehicle citations, parking tickets and, mileage that the cruisers 
were driven and gasoline consumption were all up from 1998. Motor Vehicle citations were up by 
155%) from the previous year and parking violations issued were up by 34.5%. 

Arrest statistics were at a five year high. The statistics for 1999 for assaults, larcenies, stolen 
motor vehicles, stolen bikes and vandalism were all at five year lows . 

The Police Department continued to work closely with other departments and agencies 
throughout the year. This was especially true in planning and preparing for all of the anticipated 
Y2K problems as well as for the celebrations and festivities planned for the Eve of the new 
Millennium. The Department also participated in numerous events including the Christmas and 
Memorial Day Parades, the Fourth of July celebrations, Safety Saturday, Bazaar Days, Know Your 
Town, the Feaster Five Road Race on Thanksgiving Day as well as numerous other road races held 



during the year. 

The Operations Division re-organized the responsibilities of the clerical staff and replaced 
a secretarial position with an Administrative Assistant position for the Chief and Operations 
Commander. 

RECORDS DIVISION 

The Records Division provides support services to the entire Police Department. This 
support service enables information to flow efficiently throughout the department as well as to the 
entire community. 

Through the use of the FY98 Community Policing Grant, internet access throughout the 
Department was completed and the Police Department's web site was expanded . Also with the use 
of this grant, the NT server's disk capacity was enlarged. Some of the funds awarded from the FY99 
Community Policing Grant enabled the department to purchase seven additional personal computers 
as well as upgrading various software. The FY99 Community Policing Grant awarded last year also 
continued to fund the K-9 Unit, the bicycle patrol and the motorcycle patrol. 

Additional grants were awarded this year in several different areas. A $60,000 Community 
Policing Grant was received for the purpose of provide defibrillators in the cruisers, a message 
board, a solar mobile traffic monitors and various equipment and activities for the Explorer program. 
A $150,000 COPS Fast grant was awarded to partially supplement the salary of two new patrol 
officers over a three year period, and additional $ 1 5,000 was also awarded to supplement the officer 
currently working under that grant. A $3,895 grant sponsored by the Executive Office of Public 
Safety was received that will enable the Juvenile Officer to attend meetings and training seminars 
targeting juvenile issues. A $1,000 grant was received enabling the department to place an officer 
in local liquor stores to monitor alcohol purchases. $71,400 was received from the Department of 
Justice to upgrade our computer network in the cruisers. A $725 Etching Grant was awarded that 
enabled the Town, in conjunction with the State to sponsor a day of etching vehicles with VIN 
numbers in an effort to deter MV theft. A $3,502 grant was awarded for underage drinking. 

The Court Section processed a total of 848 arrests, 396 summonses, and 965 hearings. This 
included tracking all police department cases from inception to disposition and coordinating officers 
appearances in court. In addition, this section assists in tracking District Court cases for other town 
department (Health Dept, Building Dept, etc.). The total number of arrests made in 1999 is up 
89.3% over the previous year. 

DETECTIVE DIVISION 

The Detective Division is responsible for the follow up investigations conducted by the 
agency. Since the retirement of Detective Sgt. John Bernhardt, Detective Donald Pattullo has been 
promoted to Sergeant and currently is in charge of the 5 person unit. In addition there are 2 officers 
trained in technical services such as fingerprint identification techniques and crime scene processing 
and 4 officers trained in rape investigation. The Division also has 1 investigator assigned as a 
Juvenile officer. He works closely with the schools and courts in processing Juvenile cases. 

-54- 



There are a group of investigators assigned to a new unit to combat substance abuse. These 
officers have been effective in enforcing the Department's zero tolerance policy on drug and alcohol 
as well as making numerous arrests for drug violations. 

The Detective Division continued to be actively involved in follow-up investigations 
throughout the year. The Division focused primarily on residential and business breaks as well as 
robberies and serious thefts and assaults. The Division was instrumental in solving and identifying 
the perpetrators of numerous serious crimes as well as following the cases through the judicial 
system. 

The Detective Division followed up and investigated 95 Breaking & Enterings in 1999 up 
from 83 in 1998. They also investigated 3 rapes and 1 attempted murder. 

The Division processed 219 Pistol Permit applications and 138 firearms identification cards. 
The Division also does the fingerprinting and photographing of prisoners and the processing of all 
crime scenes. The investigation of check and credit card schemes continued to account for a large 
part of the Division's manpower hours. 

The Division was also successful in solving and prosecuting several prominent vandalism 
incidents involving school buildings. 

The Division also investigates incidents on the Internet. During the past year investigators 
have been trained in dealing with this new problem. The Department recognizes this new aspect 
of Internet crime as a major problem to our community and cautions all parents and residents of the 
Town to be vigilant in combating this increasing problem. 

ANIMAL CONTROL 

The Animal Control Officer answered 942 calls for service in 1999. This is a 7.4% increase 
over 1998. He responded to 336 dog complaints and impounded 99 dogs and 5 cats. He also 
removed 1 86 deceased animals. In addition to these removed animals, there were 23 deer struck and 
killed by motor vehicles in Town. 

EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT 

The Emergency Management Division is directed by the Chief of Police and serves as the 
local link to the Federal and State Emergency Management Agencies (FEMA/MEMA) and includes 
a network of HAM radio operators that are on standby should the need arise for auxiliary radio 
services. 

The Auxiliary Police assisted the regular officers of the Police Department many times 
throughout the year. They are particularly active during the holidays and on Halloween. They are 
a very dedicated group of volunteers and the Town is fortunate to have their services as a resource. 



-55- 



Andover Police Department 
Annual Summary 





1995 


1996 


1997 


1998 


1999 




Total Incidents 


22,378 


25,501 


30,873 


28,066 


39,492 




Adult Arrest 


454 


365 


377 


410 


795 


Juvenile Arrests 


17 


27 


27 


38 


53 


Total Arrests 


471 


392 


404 


448 


848 




Rape 


1 


1 


4 


2 


3 




B&E 


134 


121 


91 


83 


95 




Assault 


97 


58 


77 


60 


56 




Larceny 


619 


607 


427 


465 


424 




Stolen MV 


104 


93 


64 


69 


44 




Stolen Bicycles 


70 


62 


37 


22 


19 




Domestic Abuse 


29 


36 


29 


25 


41 




MV Fatalities 


3 


2 


3 


1 


1 




MV Accidents 


1,219 


1,318 


1,225 


1,351 


1,243 




Vandalism 


223 


227 


213 


237 


192 




Parking Violations 


10,349 


10,074 


8,099 


6,524 


8,774 




MV Citations 


3,760 


3,578 


4,194 


3,238 


8,274 




Mileage 


393,901 


400,263 


395,546 


327,083 


395,607 




Gasoline 


34,573 


36,020 


37,207 


32,528 


37,351 



-56- 



POLICE DEPARTMENT STATISTICS 



ARRESTS 



900 
800 
700 
600 
500 
400 
300 
200 
100 




" 


■ 


^^■■■a 


■ 


^^^■B 


■ 


■mil 




'//////////% 




1 














V///SS/S//. 




%fSSSSSSSSS. 


1 
1 






1 
1 
1 



1996 



1997 1998 1999 

Juvenile II Adult 





Assaults 




80 
70 
60 
50 
40 






/\ 


/ \^ 


' -- 








1996 1997 1998 1999 







-57- 



POLICE DEPARTMENT STATISTICS 



STOLEN VEHICLES & BICYCLES 



100 

90 
80 
70 
60 
50 
40 
30 
20 
10 



1996 1997 1998 1999 

~~ •"* Motor Vehicles •"•■" Bicycles 




11,000 
10,000 
9,000 
8,000 
7,000 
6,000 
5,000 
4,000 
3,000 



PARKING VIOLATIONS 




1996 



1997 



1998 



1999 




-58- 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 

The mission of the Andover Fire Department is to proudly protect lives and property by 
providing prompt, skillful, cost-effective fire protection and life safety services to the residents of 
Andover. 



To achieve its mission, the Fire Department strives to prevent loss to property from fire or 
fire-related activities through inspections, training and maintaining its fire alarm system; loss of life 
through prompt professional delivery of emergency medical services using both fire and ambulance 
vehicles. The Department provides programs to increase fire safety awareness among area citizens 
annually in all schools and whenever requested by private organizations, industries and businesses. 



1997 



1998 



1999 



TOTAL INCIDENTS: 


5491 


5703 


7866 


Fires 


293 


245 


445 


Rescues 


14 


8 


16 


Miscellaneous Alarms 


140 


278 


404 


Accidental Alarms 


907 


243 


175 


Mutual Aid (Fire Calls) 


25 


19 


35 


False Alarms 


70 


195 


191 


Violations 


2 


1 





Ambulance Emergency Calls 


2009 


2022 


2427 


Ambulance Mutual Aid Calls 


171 


174 


155 


Fire Prevention Activities 


1757 


1864 


2040 


In-Service Calls 


12 


428 


1501 


Motor Vehicle Accidents 


168 


181 


249 


Training 


21 


45 - 


180 


Co- Activation 






48 


PERMITS/LICENSES ISSUED: ' 


1745 


2152 


2048 


Smoke Detectors 


666 


764 


716 


Report Copies 


68 


61 


77 


Blasting Permits 


14 


16 


17 


Cutting/Welding Permits 


28 


15 


13 


Dumpster Permits 


117 


69 


72 


Fireworks Display Permits 


2 


1 


1 


Gunpowder Storage Permits 





1 





Liquid Gas Storage Permits 


53 


52 


69 


Flammable Liquid Storage Permits 


2 


• 4 


1 


Miscellaneous Permits 


2 


11 


5 


Open Air Burning Permits 


791 


679 


613 


Oil Burner Install Permits 


154 


166 


159 


Reinspection Fees 











Commercial Fire Alarm Systems 


1 


28 


47 



59- 



1997 



1998 



1999 



PERMITS/LICENSES ISSUED (Cont.): 

Special Suppression System Permits 
Sprinkler Install Permits 
Tentage Permits 

Underground Tank Recertification 
Underground Tank Removals 
Underground Tank Install Permits 
Master Fire Alarm Boxes 






5 


12 


64 


58 


76 


1 


1 





4 


16 


10 


72 


99 


74 


2 


2 


2 


132 


138 


133 



FACILITIES: 



APPARATUS/EQUIPMENT: 



Central Station 

32 North Main Street 



3 ambulances, 1 ladder truck, 
2 pumpers, 1 boat, 3 sedans, 
1 Command vehicle, 1 brush truck 
and 1 lighting unit 



West Station 

Greenwood & Chandler Roads 



1 pumper, 1 fire alarm truck, 
1 boat, 1 brush truck and 
1 ladder tower 



Ballardvale Station 
Clark & Andover Streets 



1 pumper and 1 boat 



PERSONNEL: 



FEES COLLECTED: 

Ambulance Fees 
Permits/Licenses 
Fire Alarm Box Fees 



1997 


1998 


1999 


68.7 


68.7 


72.8 


1997 


1998 


1999 


$384,119 
$34,726 
$20,250 


$368,660 
$32,105 
$17,850 


$447,726 
$34,550 
$20,550 



-60- 



FIRE DEPARTMENT STATISTICS 



600 
500 
400 
300 
200 
100 




FIRE CALLS 



1 1 






1 


Y/jY/S/S/A 


■ 




I 




SSSSSSSSSSj 








1 


^■■■B 


1 


1 
1 


1 
1 


1 

: 




1 

1 
1 



1996 1997 

^ Mutual Aid 



1998 1999 

! Andover 



AMBULANCE CALLS * 



3000 



2500 



2000 



1500 



1000 



1 


^M 




i 




'////mi 


■ 


^1 ^H 






wm> 


immm 

i 
i 





1996 1997 1998 1999 

53 Mutual Aid II Andover 



2,000 



PERMITS & LICENSES 
ISSUED 




1996 



1997 



1998 



1999 



□ Dumpster ■ Open Air Burning 

E3 Master Fire Alarm Boxes Smoke Detectors 




* Some ambulance calls which did not result in transport of a patient to a hospital were ommitted from the 
ambulance call statistics prior to March, 1999. 



-61- 



DIVISION OF COMMUNITY SERVICES 

The Department of Community Services provides the residents ofAndover a myriad of social, 
educational, cultural and recreational opportunities embracing diversity and accessibility for all. 
Community Services strives to rate the pulse of the community and incorporate ideas into valued 
programs for its citizens now and in the future. 



The Division of Community Services (DCS) offers year round recreational, enrichment and 
cultural programs for residents of all ages. The majority of the programs are held at the public 
schools, Recreation Park, Pomps Pond, The Park, Senior Center, Greater Lawrence Technical High 
School and other in-town facilities. DCS continues to transfuse residents' ideas into valued 
programs. A vigorous effort by the DCS staff continually improves services to the Town's residents. 
Healthy enrollment is attributed to a repertoire of community-based instructors, streamlined 
registration including FAX, VISA/MasterCard, overnight mailbox and increased identification with 
the DCS booklet publication. The new look to the program booklet continues with layout 
improvements making the document user friendly. Enrollments have increased within the youth 
programming categories attributed to the offerings of a wide variety of interests and the scheduling 
of family friendly programmed time slots. 

Instructors come from all segments of the community. Professionals, specialists, hobby 
enthusiasts, homemakers, student interns and retired individuals comprise the teaching and 
leadership staff. This varied instructor base allows DCS the ability of offer diverse programs. The 
majority of its instructional staff reside withing the Town, however, in several instances DCS is able 
to bring in quality programs from outside the region (science, enrichment and sports). The Andona 
Society babysitting class, sports clinics, junior golf, basketball, tennis and rope skipping continue 
to be the most popular youth programs. Top adult choices are tennis, ballroom dancing, yoga, golf, 
drawing, Italian conversation and computer classes. Over 200 programs are offered each tri-semester 
with recent enrollments totaling 9,075 individuals. This year DCS offered 39 new programs for 
children and adults increasing participation by approximately 1 ,600. In addition to swim lessons and 
open swimming, sailing lessons were offered to the public at Pomps Pond. The sail fleet 
encompassed five sailboats. By the Summer's end, new features found at Pomps Pond included new 
docks, new picnic tables and grills and a ticket booth constructed as an Eagle Scout Project. During 
the Summer months, well over 15,785 people participated in DCS programs. 

DCS assists the Church Basketball League in offering a youth basketball league for 
elementary school students in grades 1 through 3. The DCS offers instructional basketball clinics 
during the year in preparation for the league. The clinics are highly successful and filled to capacity. 
Over 260 children registered in December for the Winter league that will begin in January, 2000. 

Agencies developing programs in conjunction with DCS include Memorial Hall Library, 
Alternative Leisure, Kaplan, The French and Spanish Saturday School, Kaleidoscope and American 
Association of University Women. Seven tax voucher volunteers work with the DCS staff to assist 
with registration, general office duties and after school and evening programming. In addition, 
several youth perform community service hours for school or religious requirements as well as 
several other young adults from the Alternative Sentencing Program. 



The Revolving Account continues to assist the DCS in its ability to sponsor a variety of 
activities and trips. School vacation programs, Children's Studio for the Arts and Summer Theatre 
Ensemble, violin lessons, John Smith Soccer, Big Apple Circus and a State House Tour are 
examples of programs that were funded through this account. 

Annual Town Meeting appropriations included two new playgrounds at the lower Shawsheen 
Field and Pomps Pond scheduled to be in place for opening in June,2000. These are the first Town- 
sponsored playgrounds to be installed in over fifteen years. The proposed Essex Sand and Gravel 
Pit fields moved forward with a series of public meetings hosted by the Plant and Facilities 
Department. The proposal includes building rectangular fields in the pit area with upgrades and 
parking on the upper level of Recreation Park. 

The following is a sample listing of popular programs and the number of participants: 

FALL PROGRAMS : 1998 1999 

Classes: 

Youth ages 2-18 

Adults 

Adult Basketball League: 
Millennium Dance: 
Special Events/Trips: 
Santa Parade Concert: 

TOTAL PARTICIPATION IN FALL PROGRAMS: 2,016 2,530 

WINTER PROGRAMS: 



1,100 


990 


636 


820 


1,746 


1,810 


120 


120 




250 


150 


150 




200 



Classes: 




Youth 


ages 2-18 


Adults 




Ski Programs: 




Bradford Ski 


grades 3-8 


Nashoba Ski 


grades 6-8 



1,200 


952 


835 


928 


2,055 


1,880 


200 


240 


85 


90 


285 


350 




240 


225 


250 




250 



Basketball League: grades 1-3 

Special Events/Trips: 

Father/Daughter Dance grades 1-5 

TOTAL PARTICIPATION IN WINTER PROGRAMS: 2,055 2,970 



-63- 



SUMMER PROGRAMS: 1998 1999 



Summer Classes: 




Youth - ages 2- 1 8 




Adults 




School-age Programs: 




All Day Discovery 


grades K-5 


Summer Theatre 


grades 2-10 


John Smith Soccer 


grades K-5 


Andover Eagles 


grades 6-8 


Swimming/Sailing 


ages 3+ 


Club For All 


ages 5-9 


Drop-In Playground 


grades K-5 


Drop-In Field Trips 


grades K-5 


Pre-school Programs: 




Shee-Hee 


ages 3-4 


Shaw-Knee 


ages 4-5 


Park Events 


ages 1-6 


Pomps Pond: 




Stickers 




Daily Attendance 




Days at Maximum capacity 


Average number of people per day 


Concerts: 




The Park 


all ages 


Pomps Pond 


all ages 


Special Events: 




Fourth of July 


all ages 


Trips 


all ages 


Spinner's Clinic 


all ages 


Evening Bike Rides 


all ages 



Co-Ed Adult Softball League: 
TOTAL PARTICIPATION IN SUMMER PROGRAMS: 
TOTAL PARTICIPATION IN DCS PROGRAMS: 



-64- 



1,118 


1,405 


232 


250 


1,350 


1,655 


223 


300 


125 


160 


95 


100 


• 13 


20 


113 


125 


93 


150 


620 


650 


1,200 


1,500 


2,482 


3,005 


204 


130 


217 


195 


600 


400 


1,021 


725 


210 


250 


30+/cars 


55+/cars 


20% 


90% 


140 


280 


2,400 


4,000 


98 


2,200 


1,800 


300 


1,980 


2,500 


3,000 


3,000 


75 


100 


25 


50 


120 


150 


3,220 


3,300 


600 


600 


13.053 


15,785 


17,634 


21,285 



COMMUNITY SERVICES 





FY1995 


FY1996 


FY1997 


FY1998 


FY1999 


Community Services General Fund Offset Receipts 


$280,009 


$268,766 


$348,812 


$382,952 


$400,000 


Community Services Revolving Account 


$103,637 


$85,556 


$61,166 


$152,911 


$210,750 



$500,000 
$400,000 
$300,000 
$200,000 
$100,000 



$0 



FY1995 



FY1996 



REVENUES 





_^-« 


















....• 






• „ 










•«•••* , " , 














■ 













FY1997 



FY1998 



FY1999 



- DCS Offset Receipt Revenue 

'•■ DCS Revolving Fund Expenditures 



-65- 



DIVISION OF ELDER SERVICES 

The mission of the Division of Elder Services is to identify, develop, implement and advocate 
for programs and services designed to enhance the quality of life and independence of elders in the 
community, and to provide a focal point in the community where these programs and services can 
be easily accessed by elders and their families. 



AN AWARD-WINNING YEAR 

The Senior Center was honored in 1999 with two prestigious awards: The U. S. Committee 
for the United Nations International Year of the Older Person which recognized excellence in 
intergenerational programs with Andover High School's Community Service Department and the 
Governor's ROSE Award which recognized excellence and creativity in programs and services. The 
Division of Elder Services and the Senior Center extends sincere appreciation to all staff, volunteers, 
students, Town officials and other members of the community who worked so hard to create and 
provide programs and services of the highest caliber to the community. 

SERVING THE GROWING COMMUNITY OF ELDERS 

Another year of programs and services at the Senior Center demonstrated the growing needs 
of the 5,100 members of the Andover Community of Elders. Following this report, charts and 
graphs document the Division's activities and services and demonstrate significant increases in 
many areas. Lack of appropriate space continued to provide a challenge to staff and users alike. 
Unfortunately, waiting lists were required for many programs, classes and activities. Most programs 
could not accommodate the demand. Creative programming continued to draw the interest of an 
increasing number of elders. Requests to create duplicate classes were denied due to lack of space 
and staff time. Between 1996 and 1998, for example, the number of instructional classes increased 
159%, from 212 to 550. In 1999, there was only an increase of 1% due to the lack of space. In 
addition, requests for more evening and weekend programs must be addressed in the coming year. 

Off-site activities such as the Supper Club drew singles, couples and younger elders. In 
1996, there were 30 participants and in 1999 there were 246, an increase of 720%. Special events 
tripled from 1 5 in 1 996 to 43 in 1 999, an increase of 253%. In the Medical Transportation Program, 
more riders were driven more miles by additional volunteers than ever before. The number of 
clients in the Friendly Visitor Program increase 285% from 27 in 1996 to 65 in 1998 and to 104 in 
1999. 

The social worker at the Senior Center provides a full range of casework, support groups, 
individual and family counseling, and assessment and coordination of services. The effects of an 
increasingly frail at-home elder population and changes in federal and state funded services provided 
to elders by other agencies continues to place increasing demands on the Senior Center. 

The Division's statistical report, various categories of Social Services show dramatic 

increases in the number of clients served. For example, the number of different individuals who 

were served by the social worker increased 43% from 409 in 1996 to 584 in 1999. Currently, the 

-66- 



social worker is overseeing more than 100 cases on a regular basis. Additional case coverage 
provided by contract with Family Services of Greater Lawrence also increased from 93 individuals 
in 1996 to 163 in 1999. Social Services continues to be an area of concern. Outreach, planning and 
administration will be challenges for the next several years. Coordination with other agencies will 
continue to be a priority. 

HEALTH. WELLNESS. NUTRITION. THE GENERATIONS AND ADVOCACY 

Health & Wellness 

The Senior Center provided a variety of opportunities for elders to maintain, enhance and 
improve their health. Health programs designed specifically for women and for men were offered 
and well attended. Well-known area health professionals and authors provided valuable 
information. Strength training, massage therapy, Chi Gong, aerobics, Reiki, Tai Chi and Yoga 
classes realized dramatic increases in the numbers of participants. Clearly this is an area of interest 
and an important part of the work of the Senior Center. Plans for 2000 include participation in a 
joint clinical research study with the Lahey Clinic and Brandeis University on the effects of Senior 
Center programs on the health and well-being of elders. 

Nutrition 

The nutrition program continued to serve over 20,000 meals including daily hot lunches on- 
site and Meals-on- Wheels. A decrease in the number of meals served in 1998 was attributed to the 
transition of the program from the School Department to the Senior Center in 1998. The program 
is now federally funded and significant improvement in the types and quality of meals served was 
achieved in 1999 demonstrated by a significant increase in the number of meals served. 

Intergenerational/Educational 

The Senior Center continued to work with children of all ages in the classroom and at the 
Senior Center. Some programs were simply for fun, others were educational in nature and still 
others provided a very special way for children and elders to become friends and enrich each others 
lives. Andover High School and the Senior Center participated in the Mentor-Net Project, a regional 
project designed to bring teens and seniors together to learn about the Internet and each other. 
Within each team a teen taught an elder how to use the Internet and the elder mentored the teen 
about career and college choices. Together they worked on projects such as building a web page. 
Lasting friendships were formed. Elders were able to provide students with much needed one-on- 
one time and received much more than a computer lesson in return. 

GOALS & OBJECTIVES 

The staff and Council on Aging analyze statistical data annually, raise questions about 
effective service delivery and plan for the future, continuously seeking to identify new needs and 
improve service delivery. 



-67- 



Continuing goals and objectives focus on improving social services, programs, 
intergenerational opportunities, education, volunteer opportunities and various administrative 
operations. New goals and objectives for the year 2000 include the development of improved 
transportation, initiation of the first phase of Senior Center Accreditation and the above-mentioned 
clinical research study. 

THE COUNCIL ON AGING AND THE CAMPAIGN FOR A NEW SENIOR CENTER 

On November 1 , 1 999, the Board of Selectmen signed an Agreement with Phillips Academy 
to lease Williams Hall on Phillips Street for $1 per year for thirty years for the location of the new 
Andover Senior Center. The architect was hired, site work and engineering and the all-important 
fundraising commenced. The Council on Aging, the Senior Center Building Committee and the 
Friends of the Andover Senior Center, Inc. continue to work towards the successful completion of 
this project by 2002. 



-68- 



DIVISION OF ELDER SERVICES STATISTICS 



DESCRIPTION 



FY1996 



FY1997 FY1998 FY1999 



SOCIAL DAY PROGRAM 

Number of Individual Clients 
Total Days Used 

INSTRUCTIONAL CLASSES 

Number of Unduplicated Elders 

LECTURES & SEMINARS 

Lectures & Seminars 
Number of Attendees 

NUTRITION 

Meals-on- Wheels Served 
Number of MOW Clients 
On-site Lunches Served 
Lunch Site Attendees 
Total # Meals Served 

SOCIAL & RECREATION 

Supper Club Attendees 
Number of Special Events 

MEDICAL TRANSPORTATION 

Number of Miles Driven 
Number of Rides 
Number of Riders 
Number of Drivers 

FRIENDLY VISITOR PROGRAM 

Number of Clients 
Number of Visitors 
Value of Program 

VOLUNTEER SERVICES 

Senior Center Volunteers* 
Number of Hours Served 
Value to Senior Center 



40 
3,434 



212 



47 
3,067 



480 



37 
2,591 



550 



36 

2,248 



555 



36 


36 


32 


34 


810 


969 


1,043 


978 


13,072 


13,092 


8,725 


11,770 


99 


120 


105 


112 


6,009 


10,400 


11,469 


9,117 




1,034 


1,069 


1,000 


19,180 


23,612 


20,299 


20,887 


30 


90 


100 


246 


15 


10 


25 


43 


7,917 


8,000 


12,720 


12,817 


500 


550 


1,100 


1,296 


102 


109 


150 


184 


18 


18 


26 


25 


27 


42 


65 


104 


20 


42 


90 


88 






$65,520 


$75,712 


124 


141 


149 


145 


15,519 


19,079 


22,417 


26,955 


$217,266 


$267,106 


$313,838 


$377,370 



-69- 



DIVISION OF ELDER SERVICES STATISTICS 



DESCRIPTION 



FY1996 



FY1997 FY1998 FY1999 



SOCIAL DAY PROGRAM 

Number of Individual Clients 
Total Days Used 

INSTRUCTIONAL CLASSES 

Number of Unduplicated Elders 

LECTURES & SEMINARS 

Lectures & Seminars 
Number of Attendees 

NUTRITION 

Meals-on- Wheels Served 
Number of MOW Clients 
On-site Lunches Served 
Lunch Site Attendees 
Total # Meals Served 

SOCIAL & RECREATION 

Supper Club Attendees 
Number of Special Events 

MEDICAL TRANSPORTATION 

Number of Miles Driven 
Number of Rides 
Number of Riders 
Number of Drivers 

FRIENDLY VISITOR PROGRAM 

Number of Clients 
Number of Visitors 
Value of Program 

VOLUNTEER SERVICES 

Senior Center Volunteers* 
Number of Hours Served 
Value to Senior Center 



40 
3,434 



212 



47 
3,067 



480 



37 
2,591 



550 



36 

2,248 



555 



36 


36 


32 


34 


810 


969 


1,043 


978 


13,072 


13,092 


8,725 


11,770 


99 


120 


105 


112 


6,009 


10,400 


11,469 


9,117 




1,034 


1,069 


1,000 


19,180 


23,612 


20,299 


20,887 


30 


90 


100 


246 


15 


10 


25 


43 


7,917 


8,000 


12,720 


12,817 


500 


550 


1,100 


1,296 


102 


109 


150 


184 


18 


18 


26 


25 


27 


42 


65 


104 


20 


42 


90 


88 






$65,520 


$75,712 


124 


141 


149 


145 


15,519 


19,079 


22,417 


26,955 


$217,266 


$267,106 


$313,838 


$377,370 



-70- 



ELDER SERVICES STATISTICS 



VALUE OF VOLUNTEER 
SERVICES 




FY1996 FY1997 FY1998 FY1999 



VOLUNTEER HOURS SERVED 




FY1996 FY1997 FY1998 FY1999 



OUTREACH SERVICES 



700 
650 
600 
550 
500 
450 
400 
350 
300 




FY1996 FY1997 FY1998 FY1999 

"■*- Clients ■"♦■" Cases 



115 



110 



105 



100 



95 



90 



85 



TAX VOUCHER PROGRAM 
# OF PARTICIPANTS 



FY1996 



FY1997 



FY1998 



FY1999 



-71- 



ELDER SERVICES STATISTICS 



50 



45 



40 



35 



30 



SOCIAL DAY PROGRAM 
# Clients (Non-duplicated) 



FY1996 FY1997 FY1998 FY1999 



INSTRUCTIONAL CLASSES 
# Clients (Non-Duplicated) 



600 



500 



400 



300 



200 



100 



FY1996 FY1997 FY1998 FY1999 



MEALS SERVED 




FY1996 FY1997 FY1998 FY1999 

— •"*• On-Site Lunches 
■•■•■■• Meals on Wheels 



FRIENDLY VISITOR PROGRAM 



110 
100 
90 
80 
70 
60 
50 
40 
30 
20 
10 



FY1996 FY1997 FY1998 FY1999 

—■— Clients 
■"♦■■■ Visitors 



-72- 



DIVISION OF YOUTH SERVICES 

The AYS aims to provide young people useful experiences to promote healthy growth and 
development. It is our goals to build a network of affordable, accessible, safe and challenging youth 
programs that appeal and respond to the diverse interests of young adolescents and their families. 



Andover Youth Services (AYS) was established to address the need for an increase in 
recreational, educational, social and support programs for the middle school and high school 
populations within the community. AYS supplies the youth of Andover with programs, services and 
activities throughout the year. The AYS provides a direct link that connects youth to their 
community. Andover's young people may face many challenges and it is the mission of AYS to 
develop and maintain a program that has the ability to be flexible and encourages all youth to use 
their creativity and spontaneity in positive ways. ~ 

The AYS Summer Program began with 30 kids in a mat room and has developed into a 
multi-faceted program that involves over a thousand young people. The ten-week program offers 
a wide variety of trips, adventures, camps, clinics, services and extended trips for young people 1 1 
to 16 years old. Every Summer a new line-up of activities is offered with the focus on the 
importance of teamwork and introspective learning. Additionally, participants learn that their 
strengths, combined with others, enhances the quality of the experiences and expectations for their 
lives. This is accomplished by encouraging youth to participate in the structured activities offered 
through the Summer Program. Additions to the AYS Summer Program were the Summer Shack, 
expanded Girls of Summer Program, Mountain Biking Program, Summer Track Program and an 
Introduction to Lacrosse program for 8 to 10 year olds. 

Since 1 997, the AYS has continued to expand the lacrosse program in Andover. The Youth 
League experienced an overwhelming increase in enrollment and additional youth teams were added 
for both girls and boys. In addition to growth on the youth level, AYS led the effort to fundraise and 
implement a boys lacrosse team into the high school in the Spring of 1999. The team had a 
successful season and in 2000, a girls team and JV squad are a reality. Lacrosse has been a year- 
round effort offering clinics, introductory sessions and pick-up sessions. AYS continues to support 
this growing program by sustaining year-round fundraising efforts, recruiting coaches and 
volunteers. 

In 1999, the AYS developed the White Mountain Snowboard into a series of three-day 
snowboarding camps at Loon Mountain led by a team of sponsored instructors and a multi-talented 
AYS staff with the focus on improving riding skills with instruction on free-riding, half-pipe and 
jumps while maintaining safely as the number one priority. AYS ran four camps in 1999 over 
school vacations and weekends. 

The AYS collaborated with the Division of Community Services (DCS) and expanded 
programs to the elementary schools with an enormous flag football league. Using high school 
coaches, elementary students were organized into teams and played against each other. This 
program was a phenomenal success and experienced the same enthusiasm at the middle school level. 

-73- 



The support piece of AYS has continued to flourish with an increase in the Community 
Service Program, the After-School adventure-based Program, drop in and flexible office hours, 
court-related services, volunteer and intern opportunities, hospital visits, referrals, college and 
employment recommendations, fundraising for youth programs, crisis intervention, outreach, 24- 
hour emergency response, parent support and education, discussion groups and specialized in-school 
groups. 

AYS events provided a community venue for young people to expose their creative talents. 
The Second Annual Keep It Wild Fashion Show, Homegrown Film Festival, Night of Fright, 
Shakespeare in the Park and numerous concerts and dances attracted thousands of youth and 
presented unique entertainment opportunities for the Town of Andover. 

The Andover Community Skate Park established a 23,000 square foot permanent site and 
additional improvements were made to the Park. A new fence, landscaping, seal-coated surface, 
more ramps and a well-trained staff contributed to making this year as successful as the first year. 
The support and hardwork of the Plant and Facilities Department was vital in ensuring that the 
necessary improvements were made in time for the Summer opening. 

It is essential to connect with other young people, groups and systems already working with 
young people. The AYS remained dedicated to establishing a community-wide network of 
supportive services for young people. AYS worked directly with these organizations creating and 
implementing policy, action items, fundraising and advocacy for youth. Each of the following 
groups concentrates on developing programs, services and outreach to those young people who are 
not connected positively to the Andover community: Merrimack Valley Youth Forum, Andover 
Youth Council, Andover Youth Foundation, Inc., Friends of Andover Youth, Andover Community 
Advocates for Resources, Education and Support (CARES), Gender Equity Committee, Community 
Health Advisory Team (CHAT) and AMC Youth Opportunities Program (YOP). 

The AYS advocated for a new position in the Division of Youth Services. The employee 
provides additional program and administrative support to the Division since its establishment as 
a separate entity in July. 

AYS receives ideas and concepts directly from the young people themselves and then takes 
these ideas and empowers the youth to make them happen. By interacting alongside young people, 
whether it is handing out flyers or creating plans for a new Youth Center, the programs created and 
implemented by AYS are immediate reflections of what the youth want and need. By staying true 
to our philosophy, the AYS will continue to provide a diverse range of activities, events, groups and 
programs for all young people of Andover in the new millennium. 



-74- 



VETERANS SERVICES 

The mission of the Veterans Services Office is to do whatever is necessary to provide 
Andover veterans with benefits, entitlements and services whether they be medical, administrative, 
financial or quality of life. 



The Veterans Services Office provides or coordinates all state and federal financial, medical 
and administrative benefits to Andover' s over 3,500 veterans and their families. Since July 1 , 1 999 
the Office has responded to inquiries or requests from over 500 local veterans and has provided 
direct financial assistance for fuel, food, burials and medical needs to fourteen Andover families. 
The Town receives reimbursement from the Commonwealth for 75% of the funds provided to local 
veterans under Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 115. 

In addition, the Office also plans and coordinates all patriotic observances on Veterans Day 
and Memorial Day and annually places over 2,200 flags on the graves of veterans buried in 
Andover. Band concerts and other civic activities are also handled by the Veterans Services Office. 

A major highlight in 1999 was the Office placed over 250 local veterans on a special 
Veterans Administration Pharmacy Program which allows these veterans to receive 30-day supplies 
of prescription drugs by mail for $2.00, thus savings Andover veterans thousands of dollars. 

Statistically, forty-five (45) Andover veterans died during 1999: thirty-five (35) were World 
War II veterans, four (4) were Korean veterans and six (6) were Vietnam veterans. 



-75- 




SCHOOL COMMITTEE: 
Eric J. Nadworny, Chairman 
Richard J. Collins, Secretary 
Frank M. Eccles 
Tina B. Girdwood 
Timothy M. McCarron 



ANDOVER PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

36 Bartlet Street 
Andover, Massachusetts 01810 
(978) 623-8501 
FAX (978) 623-8505 



CLAUDIA L. BACH. Ed.D. 

Superintendent of Schools 
cbach@massed.net 



ANNUAL REPORT 

1999 

Andover School Department 



During the 1999 school year the student population in the Andover Public Schools rose to 5,785. This was an increase 
of 87 students from the year before. In 1997 our student population grew by 70, and the year before that by 127 
students. Over this last year the high school student population increased by 79 students and the middle schools by 42 
students. In the 1990-91 school year our student population was at capacity in our elementary schools. Three years 
later our middle schools reached capacity. The severely overcrowded conditions that now exist in the elementary and 
middle schools have limited or threatened to eliminate completely important programs and activities for the students of 
the Andover Public Schools. 

Currently, the students, along with more than 700 professional and support staff are housed in one 9-12 high school, 
two 6-8 middle schools, four K-5 elementary schools, and one K-2 controlled choice school. The FY' 99 appropriation 
of $36,357,762 permitted the school department to move forward in several areas described below, but some important 
initiatives and programs were slowed due to budget constraints. Despite our overcrowded schools and limited funds, 
the professional staff in 1998-99 continued to be committed to providing a high quality educational experience for all 
students. 

To alleviate overcrowding, the School Committee placed on the warrant for the 1999 Town Meeting an article 
requesting $2,517,000 for architectural and engineering services for constructing a new elementary school and a new 
middle school. By summer, 1999 the Town Manager hired the firm of Symmes, Manni & McKee, and appointed the 
School Building Committee comprised of: Mark Johnson (Chair), Jack Driscoll, Bernie Morrissey, Alan Champagne, 
Ray Hender, Tina Girdwood (also a member of the School Committee), and Claudia Bach (Superintendent of 
Schools). The School Committee voted to approve the Education Specifications for the schools, and the Building 
Committee approved the site plans during fall, 1999. The School Committee will place an article on the warrant for 
construction of the new schools. If the Town votes in favor of the article at Town Meeting in April, 2000, and it is 
approved by the Board of Selectmen, a debt exclusion referendum will go before the Town at a general election in late 
spring, 2000. 

In spring, 1999 the Superintendent presented to the School Committee for its approval a "Short Term Space Needs 
Plan" to respond to the overcrowding in the elementary and middle schools. The Plan included constructing additional 
walls at Doherty to create two temporary classrooms, and the conversion of the teachers' room into a temporary 
classroom at Sanborn. (For a number of years walls have been constructed at schools to create more space, closets 
have been converted into office space, and modular classrooms have been purchased for Sanborn and Bancroft.) In 
1998-99 all schools continued using cafeterias, stages, and hallways for music and art classes. In both middle schools 
more core curriculum teachers were required to share their classrooms, and some language arts, music and art teachers 
traveled from classroom to classroom with their supplies on carts. The Short Term Space Needs Plan will be reviewed 
and updated for the upcoming school year. Among other ideas under consideration, we anticipate converting Central 
Office space into classrooms for Doherty. 

School Committee and Central Administration nc 

The five elected Members of the School Committee met at least twice monthly during the year. Mr. Eric Nadwomy 
ran unopposed in March. At its first meeting following the election, the Committee re-elected Mr. Nadworny 
Chairperson and elected Mr. Richard Collins Secretary of the Committee. 



In Fall, 1999 the Superintendent appointed Mr. Bruce MacDonald Interim Principal at Andover High School. Mr. 
MacDonald stepped out of retirement to replace Mr. Larry Robinson who passed away in September, two days before 
the start of the school year. A search for a new high principal will begin in January, 2000. 

In the spring, after input from teachers, administrators and Townwide PTO, the School Committee approved the Goals 
and Objectives for the 1999-00 school year. They are: 

Over-riding goal: Ensure exemplary schools for our children. 

Working Goal: If we were to have an exemplary school program, what would it look like? 

Goal 1: Base all decisions under the basic assumption that each child is a constant learner 

Goal 2: Make schools exemplary in areas of curriculum, instruction, assessment and support services, 

exceeding state standards where possible 
Goal 3: Commit to developing and maintaining exemplary facilities 

Goal 4: Promote positive and productive working relationships among all members of the school community 
Goal 5 Foster working relationship with School Committee, Selectmen and Finance Committee members to 

develop and implement strategic School/Town Planning 
Goal 6: Continue to improve community confidence in our school system 

In late summer, the School Committee met with the objective of providing future direction to staff. In answer to the 
working goal presented above, the Committee came to agreement that an exemplary education should: 

1 . Focus on the education, development and well-being of all students (that everyone share the 
conviction that we should have the best possible school system). 

2. Offer a rigorous and challenging academic program to inspire the best efforts of students at every 
level. 

3. Respect fine teaching; encourage teachers to continue as active learners throughout their careers. 

4. Offer stimulating extra-curricular programs in the arts, athletics, and community service — especially 
important to students who may not enjoy classroom success. 

5. Have an adequate, competent and caring support staff. 

6. Have leadership that provides a sure sense of direction to the system inspiration to the staff, and 
strong advocacy in support of teachers. 

7. Respect parents as vital participants in their children's education, and invite their involvement in the 
schools. 

8. Place high value on community involvement and encourage on-going mutual communication with 
townspeople and community organizations. 

9. Recognize and celebrate accomplishments of both students and staff. 

10. Hold individual teachers accountable for maintaining high standards. Work with under-performing 
students to help them achieve success, instead of letting them drop through the cracks unnoticed. 

11. Be always evolving — not standing still — with teachers, staff and administrators constantly seeking 
ways to improve their schools. 

12. Exhibit a culture of shared values, good citizenship and mutual respect in every school. 

At the same time the Committee identified new areas for long range planning. These are: Facilities, Programs, 
Governance, Human Resources, Special Education, and the Library/Media Program. These programs joined existing 
long-range plans for Curriculum Instruction and Assessment, Technology, Professional development, Capital 
Improvement, and Budget. These individual plans together constitute the school district's Comprehensive Long- 
Range Plan. 

School Committee meetings included the "Superintendent's Showcase of Exemplary Practices" and workshop sessions 
to discuss important issues such as criteria for honor roll, Level I, II, and III classes at the high school, graduation 
requirements, after school programs, and school culture in the wake of Columbine. Members of the School 
Committee, Administration, and the Andover Education Association engaged in a series of informal roundtable 
sessions to improve the working relationship among the parties and to move forward together on important education 
initiatives. 

Assistant Superintendent - Curriculum, Instruction, Assessment, and Professional Development 

Annually, it is important to reflect upon the accomplishments of the teachers and administrators whose thoughtful 
work contributed to meeting the second year educational goals of Andover 's five-year curriculum plan. Ninety-seven 
teachers, four assistant principals, seven high school program advisors, five elementary principals, two middle school 
principals, and six K-12 program coordinators worked diligently during the school year and in the summer to develop 
a coherent and quality educational program for Andover students. 



Andover teachers implemented new and/or revised programs in social studies (grades K - 5 and grades 6 - 9), 
mathematics (grades 7 - 9), science (grade 9), English language arts (grades 6 - 9), and Latin IV through a planned 
and coordinated set of strategies aimed at achieving the district mission and vision of curriculum and instruction. The 
program implementation included new teacher-developed curriculum guides and materials, teacher-developed 
evaluation materials designed to determine student achievement of the Andover Curriculum Standards and 
Benchmarks, and a $309,000 expenditure for new textbooks and curriculum specific computer software. 

Professional development training centered on the district goals of diversifying instructional strategies in the 
classroom, writing in the content areas, and technology. The Staff Development Commission provided 360 teachers 
inservice courses during the school year. Grade 4 teachers participated in an expense-free graduate level course on 
Ancient Civilizations at UMass-Lowell through a grant written with surrounding communities. The grant also 
provided $2000 for library books to supplement the classroom curriculum study of ancient civilizations. 

Andover students participated in local, state, and national testing programs during the past year. Students in grade K - 
9 took mathematics and science pilot tests developed by Andover teachers and administrators to measure each 
student's performance in achieving the grade level benchmarks. Grade 3 students took the Iowa Test of Basic Skills in 
vocabulary, reading comprehension, and spelling in April 1999. Ninety-seven percent of the third graders tested met 
the state reading goal, including those with special needs who may require accommodated testing procedures and 
students with limited English. Students in grades four, eight, and ten took the second MCAS (Massachusetts 
Comprehensive Assessment System) exams in English, mathematics, science and technology, and social 
science/history. The intent of these assessments is to raise academic standards across the Commonwealth and to make 
schools and students accountable. The second year test scores revealed that many Andover students were above the 
state average ("proficient" and "advanced") in all four subject areas. There were also a number of students who scored 
in the "needs improvement" and "failing" category. Overall, Andover ranked 1 1* in the state on the second round of 
MCAS testing. In the area of college admission test scores, 95% of Andover High School students took the SAT 1 
with a high score of 1 1 18. One hundred and twenty-four students took 220 Advanced Placement exams and achieved 
an average score of 3.9 out of 5 points. The class of 2000 had 5 semi-finalists and 5 commended students recognized 
by the National Merit Scholarship Program. 

Several Andover administrators, Brenda O'Brien, Theresa Murphy, David Nichols, Raymond Tode, and Marinel 
McGrath, wrote and received $429,098 in state, federal, and private foundation grants. The grants funded curriculum 
development and professional development opportunities for teachers and adrninistrators in the areas of mathematics, 
science, reading, writing, social studies, technology and media, health education, advanced placement course 
development in English language and environmental science, lesson development and materials for gifted and talented 
students, and assessment development. 

In summary, the initiatives in curriculum, instruction, assessment, and professional development continued to advance 
the coherence and quality of our educational program. There are many goals yet to achieve which are dependent upon 
adequate levels of budget funding. Our professional staff must have the resources if we are to continue to be 
competitive with similar school districts in developing and providing a high quality educational program for the 
students of the Andover Public Schools. 

Business Office 

The primary responsibility of the Business Office is the development and oversight of the Annual School Budget. 
This includes constructing the budget, monitoring expenditures, administering the financial provisions of labor 
contracts, purchasing, preparation of a Five Year Financial Forecast, development of a Five Year Capital Improvement 
Program, and tracking grant awards and disbursements. In addition to financial oversight, the Business Office is 
responsible for facilities management, system-wide technology, student transportation and food services. 

In 1999 the Business Office completed several major projects: 

• The technological capabilities of the Business Office were upgraded. New equipment was purchased in 1997 and 
new financial management software was purchased in 1998. The payroll and accounts payable systems were 
successfully converted during calendar year 1999. This conversion to new financial management software was 
conducted jointly with the Town. 

• The Business Office continued to play an important role in the expansion of school facilities by providing 
valuable data (enrollment projections, etc.) to the School Committee, the Superintendent of Schools, the School 
Building Committee and Town personnel which assists iiydie planning needed to address existing overcrowded 
schools and providing adequate student space in the future. 



• The annual Five Year Capital Improvement Plan was updated to reflect the ever-changing needs of the School 
System. In conjunction with building principals and the Department of Plant and Facilities, priorities were set and cost 
estimates established. Major items were included as part of the town's annual Capital Improvement Program. 

• The Student Management Software used the past two years at Andover High School was successfully installed at 
the other seven schools. Extensive training for administrators and support staff has been ongoing. The middle schools 
will use the new software for student scheduling for the 2000-2001 School Year. 

Human Resource Office 

• After an extensive and lengthy appeal process, the classification plan project work finally came to an end. The 
project involved the re- writing of every town job description, as well as the hierarchical ranking of all positions 
within town government. Concomitant with the work on. the classification plan was the completion of a wage and 
salary survey for the positions within the plan. Both the classification plan and the wage and salary 
recommendations have been accepted by the Town's Independent Employee Association and will be implemented 
shortly. 

• The Human Resources Office continued to serve as the liaison for both the Town and the School Departments to 
the Commission on Disabilities. Over the last year, extensive accessibility audits were done on the Shawsheen 
School, Andover High School, the West Middle School and the Town's election polling sites. The Town's Plant 
and Facilities Department, as well as the Town's Engineering Department, did extensive work both inside and 
outside of these facilities. Examples of this work include the improvement of handicap parking spaces, the re- 
grading of accessible ramps, the improvement of fire evacuation and exit signage within the high school, and 
various other improvements within these buildings. 

• In the area of training, Human Resources facilitated an extensive management-training program for town 
supervisors and department heads. This training included work with the Myers-Briggs Personal Style Inventory 
and assessment of each participant's management and communication skills. Work was also begun in providing a 
cohesive and coherent approach to employee performance appraisal. 

• Recruitment, as always, was an area of tremendous activity throughout the year. We approximated 90 school- 
related hires over the summer months alone; most notable in this group were an interim high school principal, an 
assistant director of pupil personnel and a special education program head for the high school. At the same time, 
Town recruitment, although less voluminous, remained quite active. Most notable among Town hires were an 
assessor, a director of public works, and a construction project manager to oversee the Town's major building 
projects. 

• Other notable initiatives included: the re-certification of 95% of Andover's public school teachers in accordance 
with the requirements of the Education Reform Act; participation in extensive training in interest-based collective 
bargaining; and inoculation of parks and ground workers against Lyme disease. 

School Reports 

Andover High School 
Social Studies Department 

In Year II of a five-year plan to align curriculum with state standards, the department completed the revision of the 9 th 
grade course work and developed a teacher's guide. A new test — Littel's World Civilization — was successfully 
introduced at the freshman level. Plans are underway to add four electives to the departmental program in 2001-2002, 
with another four additions the following year. 

• The English Department 

The department brought its 9 th and 10 th grade curriculum into alignment with both Massachusetts Curriculum 
Frameworks and the new history curriculum in a two-year sequence preparing students for the MCAS. The new 
course, "Diverse Views as Seen Through Literature," introduced students to a wider range of cultural voices than the 
traditional American-Brit-Lit course of the past. 

• World Language Department 

The department introduced two new courses: an introductory Latin class and Latin IV. Department members 
continued to make the most of the new technology installed in the lab last year. 

• The Mathematics Department 

An assessment program replicating the MCAS was initiated to better prepare students for the statewide exams. 
Advanced Placement Statistics and an introductory course in Advanced Placement C++ were added to the curriculum 
to provide juniors and seniors with a broader background for college placement. 

• The Science Department 

Students benefited from the updated computer simulatiorr/spftware series from Logal and Probeware from Vernier. 
The AHS Science Team, consisting of students from all four grades, continued to hold their own in the North Shore 



Science League, a group of 40 schools who compete in events ranging from basic scientific knowledge to 

sophisticated problem solving. 

• Counseling Department 

The department continued to bridge the transition from middle-to-high school with an orientation night for parents of 

eighth graders. Students looking forward to the transition to college were supported by the successful "Choice, Not 

Chance" college planning program designed to present and explain the variety of opportunities available to our 

graduates. 

Doherty Middle School 

During the past year we sought to maintain our academic programs while contending with our ever-increasing student 
population. New classrooms were carved out of existing space. Approximately 20% of the cafeteria was walled in to 
create a world language class. Half of the industrial arts shop room was also walled off to create another classroom. 

Doherty's School Improvement Council was extremely active in 1999. The council focused its efforts on the impact 
of class size on student performance, student/teacher ratios, ratios of students to other support resources, and the 
establishment of a school environment characterized by acceptance and respect for all groups. The plan created by the 
council was submitted to the School Committee on November 29, 1999. To the extent that it was possible, the 
recommendations found in this plan were supported in the budget prepared by the Superintendent of Schools. 

Reflecting the School's commitment to the middle school philosophy, Doherty continued to emphasize and expand on 
the team concept. For some time now, we have included a special education teacher as a full participant on each team. 
Under this model SPED teachers attend classes every day in each of the team academic disciplines, working with both 
students and subject teachers. This allows a more productive assisted study later in each day because the special 
education teacher knows exactly what is going on in all the team subjects. That teacher also has a homeroom and 
attends the daily team meetings. This inclusive model has become a keystone of our school by placing Doherty in the 
unique and positive position of being able to better serve the needs of special education students as well as those in 
regular education. 

As was the case last year, Doherty's teachers continued to emphasize performance-based education as a fundamental 
part of middle school instruction. Teams found every opportunity to allow students to publicly demonstrate their 
learning. This "hand-on" approach to instruction is a hallmark of a true middle school. 

West Middle School 

Under the direction of parent volunteers and the West Student Government, West Middle School instituted a school 
wide community service requirement. The "Bridge of Kindness" program invited all students to submit proposals for 
five hours of service and outreach to the community. Each proposal was approved by the Student Government. 

Technology initiatives took place last year. Grade 6 students took part in an international curriculum exchange 
through a "SMARTkids" Foundation grant. Students in six United States cities and six Canadian cities shared ideas 
and learning through the Internet. Six 'ambassadors' from West traveled to Calgary, Canada to meet students from 
each of the participating cities. 

Dr. Karen Jacobs-Gold co-taught in Mr. Ken Kwajewski's technology classes. Together they raised students' 
awareness of proper occupational therapy techniques needed for healthy technology use. This unique program was 
recognized in U.S. News and World Report , the New York Times and the local media. 

To increase literacy, West students were participants in the "Read Across America" project, logging miles as they read 
across the country. Monthly "Drop Everything And Read" (D.E.A.R.) events further encouraged enjoyment in 
reading, as all staff and students set apart time for pleasure reading, book talks and Media Center visits. The Andona 
Society and the Andover Fund for Education provided grant funding in support of West's new Literacy Journal. 
Student submissions of essays, poetry and creative writing were published. The Greater Lawrence Collaborative 
included several compositions in their joint writing project, A ppleSauce . Other literacy programs included, "Poem in 
Your Pocket" Day, Morning Read and Book Talks with real life authors 

Bancroft School 

Bancroft had four focus areas this past year - communication, cooperation, challenge and celebration. To further 

enhance communication within the Bancroft community, two new initiatives were established - WBAN BANCROFT 

TODAY - a weekly, student produced, TV News program^and THE BANCROFT BANTER - a weekly professional 

newsletter. 



Bancroft received its third Technology Literacy Challenge Grant. The $40,000 Department of Education grant was 
used to establish a professional development training center to encourage writing across the curriculum with portable 
word processors - "The Write Way With The Write Tool - Alpha Smart 2000's". The training center offered four full 
day workshops and five special interest groups for MassCUE (Massachusetts Computer Using Educators). The 
training team provided mentoring assistance to Lawrence, Lowell, Shrewsbury, Westford, and Maiden Public Schools. 
Student use was expanded to grades two through five. 

In the area of cooperation, Bancroft's Student Council expanded its efforts in community service learning projects. 
The council was comprised of 86 members, five faculty and three parent advisors. There were four subcommittees - 
Community Service, Earth Watch, The Big B School Store, and Hospitality/School Spirit. The council worked 
cooperatively on a number of cross-age teaching projects with middle and high school representatives. 

Two new professional developments were created to address the challenge of effective instructional practice. 
Bancroft's Newcomers Club was developed and approved as a professional inservice program by the Staff 
Development Commission. Seventeen teachers and specialists participated in a series of bimonthly discussion/training 
workshops on such topics as differentiated instruction, behavior management techniques, evaluation, etc. A bimonthly 
training program also was established for all regular and special education teaching assistants. Our goal was to 
enhance the use of assistants for instructional support and enrichment groups. . 

In the area of celebration, Bancroft established a new student recognition program - "Who I Am Makes a 
Difference"! Students were awarded gold cards for their random acts of kindness to others and personal contributions 
to the school community. Bancroft also celebrated the completion of a new kindergarten playground thanks to the 
collaborative efforts of the School Improvement Council and PTO. 

Henry C. Sanborn Elementary School 

In keeping with the United Nations' declaration of Year 2000 as International Year of Peace, Sanborn School's 1999- 
2000 theme was Keeping the Peace. Through vocabulary development, research opportunities, reading incentives, 
presentations, and other hands-on activities, the students learned the words and skills of 'keeping the peace'. These 
skills came in handy as our school population burgeoned! We had four classes at each of the six grade levels utilizing 
every large-group space in the building with a total of 480 students and 22 classroom teachers. Art, music and health 
teachers instructed in the classrooms with the result that every other nook and cranny in the building was used for 
small group instruction and teacher planning. Nevertheless, the school community remained as committed and active 
as ever. Our tradition of community service continued through the sponsoring of such activities as Harvest Festival, 
Spooky Fun Fair, Si Se Puede coat collection, Jump Rope for Heart, Toys for Tots, Childreach, UNICEF. 

An extraordinarily active parent group and student council helped keep the school spirit and civic responsibility 
programs vital. An unprecedented 36 parent sub-committees enabled the staff to provide a wide range of extra services 
including enrichment activities, birthday wishes, school directory, school Web site, sign board, and gardens. New 
projects included the addition of the Candy Bachner Memorial Outdoor Classroom and the Sanborn Arboretum. Most 
importantly, the Sanborn students continued to do well academically and in every other way. Ninety-six per cent of 
our third graders scored in the proficient or advanced categories on the reading portion of the Iowa Tests of Basic 
Skills (51% at the advanced level). The fourth graders did well with the MCAS tests with similar scores to those 
received by last year's group, which puts our students in the top-scoring twenty schools across the state in the area of 
English/Language Arts. School personnel and parents continued to feel great satisfaction as they worked together to 
identify areas for growth and ways to accomplish their goals in a creative fashion. 

Shawsheen Elementary School 

In 1999 Shawsheen School, Andover's only open enrollment school, continued to attract students to its Kindergarten 
through Grade 2 integrated primary program. Parents who selected the school valued the interdisciplinary thematic 
approach used by classroom teachers and specialists to make learning meaningful. The culminating activity at each 
grade level was a performance related to the school's year long theme, "Endangered Species". At the Kindergarten 
level, Earthsong , A Story in Song about Endangered Species was adapted to include the endangered species of our 
planet. Children sang about their adopted species and provided examples of physical education activities that related 
to the theme. First Graders performed in The Old Lady Who Liked Cats , a musical adaptation of Carol Green's book 
about the importance of maintaining the balance of nature's chain. The Second Graders' production, We Are All 
Earth's Children , was a delight. Parents designed the spectacular scenery and costumes for the musical. Everyone was 
impressed with the knowledge the children had acquired and their ability to perform on the stage at the Collins Center. 

-81- 
Helping children to act responsibly continued to be a major goal of the school. Last year's course, Positive Discipline 
and Effective Class Meetings , was followed by a fall study group entitled, The Responsive Classroom . Together, the 



staff learned additional techniques to increase social skills and decrease student behavior problems. After the children 
compiled classroom rules and logical consequences for breaking the rules, the staff asked the children to come up with 
one rule for the school that embodied all the rules. The rule they decided upon was: "WE TAKE CARE OF 
OURSELVES AND EVERYONE AT SHAWSHEEN SCHOOL." Class meetings and morning meetings were held 
regularly to affirm the humanity and dignity of students and provide children with a bridge into learning that made 
school more productive and children better citizens. 

In 1999 children at Shawsheen continued to write books that were published with the help of parent volunteers. The 
children wrote more than 320 books, which were produced by three coordinators and 35 parents. First Graders read 
their books to parents at Authors' Teas. Five children shared their stories about family life, hiking, football, baseball 
and Disney World with the School Committee. Grants from Hewlett Packard, the Andover Fund for Education and 
Shawsheen's PTO provided equipment and software that sped up the publishing process and lightened the load for 
volunteers. 

"The Once Upon a Time" auction sponsored by the PTO netted over $25,000 for the school Media Center, the 
classrooms and staff development. Bookshelves, tables, chairs, display racks, books, software, a LCD Projector and 
an area rug were purchased for the center. All of the items listed on teachers' wish lists were also bought. Ways to 
teach higher level thinking skills were demonstrated by a Talents Unlimited consultant and summer staff development 
was funded. 

The Town's Capital Improvement Plan provided funds to replace the gymnasium floor and upgrade the embankment 
and playfield. The children look forward to using the upper playfield in the spring of 2000. 

South Elementary School 

The 1998-1999 school year began with 610 students and our school theme, "Who I Am Makes A Difference." Our 
school engaged in meaningful learning experiences, and we continued to see tremendous contributions to South 
School from our parents, teachers, students, staff members, and business partnerships. Our school beliefs of respect, 
responsibility, diversity, and lifelong learning continued to be our guiding values. 

We thank the Andover School Committee for supporting our staffing initiatives. Our goal is to continue to advocate a 
strong school culture that leads to high achievement, strong relationships among students and teachers, and mutual 
respect for individual differences. Evidence of the culture at South includes the following: the holiday gift giving, the 
food drive, Spaghetti Supper, Curriculum Night, Budding Authors Week, Sock Hop, Community Read-Along, 
Teacher Appreciation Day, Children's Book Week, Ice Cream Festival, Celebration of Learning Day, and musical 
presentations at every grade level. 

Let's reflect on some grade level highlights: 

Our kindergarten teachers wrote a math literacy grant, and students profited by the use of story boards, thinking 

games, and math manipulatives obtained through the use of those funds. 

Grade 1 students read to their parents on May 12 at the annual Authors Day, and a variety of class books were 

published by our first grade authors. 

Grade 2 teachers collaborated on a grade level thematic unit on penguins that included a trip to the aquarium in 

Boston. Second grade classes made family quilts as part of the social studies unit on ancestors. 

Grade 3 students each published a collection of their work for the year in a hard cover book produced by Wells 

Bindery. The Eminent People Project involved research, the production of a three-sided story board, a Hyper-Studio 

presentation, and grade 3 students dressing in character to present their eminent person. 

Grade 4 students studied poetry with Andover Poet Mary Chivers. 

Grade 5 students studied archeology at the Peabody Museum at Phillips Academy. Speakers presenting to the fifth 

graders included Peter Merrick from the Division of Fisheries and Wild Life, who spoke to the students on his research 

on red bellied turtles; Kara Kelleher, who spoke to the students about her work as a civil engineer; and Steven Baker 

from the New England Aquarium, who shared his research on puffins. 

In October Dr. Eileen Woods went to Washington, D.C. to receive the Thomas C. Passios Award and the National 
Distinguished Principals' Award. Fifth Grade Teacher Bonnie Browning was named the Andover School 
Department's Unsung Hero of the Year at the annual Founder's Day Dinner. The Special Needs Parent Advisory 
Council named First Grade Teacher Rosemary Pinksten an outstanding teacher for her contributions to the special 
needs students mainstreamed in her class. Grade 5 teacher Frank Rapisardi was presented the 1998 Lloyd Reuss 
award for teaching excellence in science for the most creative use of the World in Motion science curriculum. The 
fifth grade presented this exemplary program to the Andover School Committee during the spring of 1999. 



West Elementary School 

West Elementary School engaged in a variety of activities during the past year. Our school-wide theme was Sail the 4 
Cs: Caring, Cooperation, Consideration, and Character. Our goal was that all members of the West Elementary 
School community would treat each other with kindness and consideration. The staff, along with parents, encouraged 
prosocial behavior on the part of students. We wanted to ensure that children grow to adulthood with the values that 
we all cherish, such as honesty, kindness, and personal responsibility. To highlight our theme, the student council 
members created and presented a show that was seen by all students. The show consisted of songs and skits that 
focused on the various segments of our school-wide theme. The theme was also discussed in class meetings 
throughout the school year. 

The student council was also involved in a number of other activities. Council members collected donations of non- 
perishable goods and delivered them to the People's Pantry in North Andover. Student council members also 
volunteered their time to work at the People's Pantry. A continuing clean up of the school grounds was another student 
council initiative. Students from all grade levels became "trash detectors" and removed litter from the playgrounds. A 
bake sale "to charity was held just prior to the holiday recess. The council sponsored the annual luncheon for all first 
grade parents, giving parents the opportunity to eat lunch with their children. 

West Elementary School students were involved in two other charitable enterprises. The Jump-Rope-for-Heart event 
raised more than $1,300. The Easter Seals Shoot-Out generated donations in excess of $1,200. The school store, 
staffed by fifth grade students, raised money to fund outdoor education scholarships. 

Twelve teachers participated in the Reach Out to Schools: Social Competency Program. The program, run by the 
Stone Center at Wellesley College, is a comprehensive, multi-year social and emotional training program for 
elementary (grades K-5) children, their teachers, principals, and parents. The program recognizes the important role 
that relationships play in the academic and social success of children. The program works to support caring, respectful 
school communities with high expectations for all students. Participating teachers attended a two-day summer training 
program. They also attended periodic training sessions during the school year. Both the principal and assistant 
principal attended a training session, as well. The program involved weekly meetings, called Open Circles, whose 
purpose was to help students to work together as members of a classroom community. Students used these meetings to 
talk about classroom and school-related problems. The goal was to encourage students to be problems solvers and 
invest them in the process of being active, involved citizens. The West Elementary PTO continued its strong support 
of school activities. The PTO purchased supplies for 25 teachers who participated in the Imagemaking in the Writing 
Process workshop. They also sponsored the fifth annual WERAWC authors' and writers' conference. The student- 
produced West TV aired every other Friday during the school year. These programs were educational in nature and 
focused on a different topic and classroom each time. 

School District Department Reports 

Pupil Personnel Department 

The Pupil Personnel Office is responsible for insuring the delivery of specialized services to students who qualify 
according to Chapter 766 of the Massachusetts State Regulations. Services may be offered in one or a combination of 
the following areas: Specially Designed Instruction, Health Care, Speech/Language, Occupational &/or Physical 
Therapy and Counseling. This office also employs three teachers to provide instruction of English as a Second 
Language (ESL) for those students whose native language is one other than English, and two consultants/teachers for 
student with visual and/or hearing impairments. 

In 1999 over 850 students received some form of special service, which was an increase of 145 over last year. This 
increase represented 14.7% of Andover's total student population of 5765. State averages for Chapter 766 services 
(17%) continued to be higher than Andover's by 2.3%. The committed staff deserved the credit and recognition for 
maintaining quality services while recognizing the need to be fiscally responsible. 

Enrollment declined noticeably in the number of students requiring out-of-district placements in 1999. Only 42 
students were in out-of-district placements compared to 63 students the year before. This reduction in number was, in 
part, due to the positive impact the middle and high school alternate programs had in providing quality options for 
students that allowed them to remain in the community. It is the hope and expectation that the development of 
additional options and the enhancement of existing programs will sustain this trend. 

Technology is an important tool for assessment, instructfiSw and management of student data. The mandates of both 
federal and state laws reflect the value, importance, and impact that appropriate training and utilization of technology 



can have in the lives of students. We continued to explore how technology can assist students and teachers in being 
more efficient independent learners in this fast paced information age. 

Teacher training was an ongoing process to enhance and upgrade their skills to enable teachers to meet the needs of 
students presenting with more complex physical and mental issues. Those who attended workshops and conferences 
freely shared their new knowledge with colleagues. Individual staff members developed and taught professional 
development courses within the district and served as an ever-ready resource to staff. On a larger scale, district wide 
training will be required of all staff given the recent changes in both the federal and state laws that govern the criteria 
and delivery of services for students. By the fall of 2000, a new IEP form will be implemented as required by the state 
and federal laws. The emphasis for service delivery is shifting, to a larger extent, to general educators, with special 
educators providing support and specific strategies for improved learning. 

In summary, the landscape of special education and the population it serves, with multiple variations, is continually 
changing. The number and complexity of students requiring service increased over last year placing serious strain on 
the existing staff. Teachers and therapists pursued additional training to meet student needs in the areas of instruction 
and technology with additional in-district training, to meet the demands of changes in the federal and state laws. The 
goal of the staff continued to be that of striving for excellence in educational environments while recognizing the 
restraints of the resources available to them. 

Health Education Department 

The Andover Health Education Department provided comprehensive health instruction to the students of Andover to 
increase each student's mental, physical, emotional, and social well being. In 1999 there was full implementation of 
The Great Body Shop K-5 Comprehensive Health and Substance Abuse Prevention Curriculum and Grades 6-9 and 
11-12 Health Education Curricula. We instituted sequential and coordinated teaching of health in compliance with 
State Curriculum Framing Learning Standards. We placed five health teachers in our elementary schools in 1999 to 
build positive self-concepts and decision making techniques in our children at an early age. Secondary students were 
given accurate, clearly defined, current health knowledge so that they may achieve their highest potential for well 
being. This program was designed to provide a variety of strategies and materials to enhance the students' quality of 
life. 

The Department of Health Education administered the Center for Disease Control Youth Risk Behavior Survey to all 
middle and high school students with parental permission. Behaviors related to tobacco, alcohol and illegal drug use, 
sexuality, diet, exercise, violence, and mental health issues were reported. Community network teams such as 
Andover's Community Health Advisory Team, Gender Equity Task Force, Andover C.A.R.E.S. (Community 
Advocates for Resources, Education, and Support), Curriculum Councils, Youth Council, and After School At-Risk 
Programs met to build safe schools and communities. Staff wellness promotion via "Healthy Highlights," a health 
newsletter, was distributed. Check It Out, a community forum presenting the zero tolerance policy to Grades 6-12 
students and parents in conjunction with the police department was presented. 

♦ Parent-to-Parent sponsored speakers, workshops, and parenting education classes on a variety of health topics. 
Dr. Michael Thompson spoke on "Protecting the Emotional Life of Boys", Dr. David Treadway on "Sex, Drugs, 
and Rock and Roll— Can We Talk", and Professor Renee Hobbs on "Media Madness". Workshops on building 
skills essential for good parent-child relationships were offered. 

♦ "Making Connections, " an interactive conference attended by all seventh graders and their parents, was held at 
Doherty and West Middle Schools. The conference featured workshops on communication and decision making 
skills which were facilitated by high school peer leaders and professionals from the fields of adolescent 
development. 

♦ At Andover High School girls participated in "Model Mugging" which imparts strategies for safe living. TEG 
and TAP Smoking Cessation programs were maintained. On going student support groups such as Kids for Kids, 
Students Against Drunk Driving, Growing Up Taking A Stand, Women's and Men's Issues Groups, Gay Straight 
Alliance, and Peer Leadership were active representatives of healthy lifestyles. 

Arts Department 
Performing Arts: 

Over 750 students Grades 3-12 pursued instrumental study. Instrumental and vocal students continued to participate 
through the audition process for district and state ensembles, and earned the following awards: 

Five AHS students All-State 2 vocal, 3 instrumental 

Eleven students Senior District 4 v8&l, 7 instrumental 
Seventeen students Junior District 14 vocal, 3 instrumental 



Andover High School '99 musical was "Guys and Dolls". 

Visual Arts: 

Andover High School student art work was submitted to the Boston Globe and earned the following awards: 

• 2 Gold Keys 

• 2 Silver Keys 

• 5 Honorable Mentions 

A full time drama director was hired for Andover High School. The department added two additional drama courses 
at the high school level: Art of Theatre and Improvisational Theatre. 

Notable Accomplishments: 

Andover High School Marching Band received a Gold Medal at the New England Scholastic Band Association Finals. 

The district fine arts program "Bach to Bach" was presented. This production included students from every school and 
every grade level. The master of ceremonies moved the audience through a chronological program of music from the 
Baroque period to present day. A district wide art exhibit accompanied the production. 

Educational Technology Department 

The Andover Public Schools computer network was completed during the summer. Over 5000 student user accounts 
and 500-employee accounts were created and became operational. Every classroom and office space within the school 
system gained access to the Internet, e-mail, and other network services. The computer LAN/WAN network is 
comprised of 3200 computer drops in 9 buildings, 22 Windows NT servers, and 1400 Macintosh and Windows 
personal computers. All of the schools are connected to each other via a hybrid fiber-coax cable television (CATV) 
system that provides two-way data and video signal transmission. Free Internet access is provided to the Andover 
Public Schools through MediaOne's RoadRunner service. MediaOne agreed to provide no cost maintenance for the 
Andover CATV Institutional system. 

Over the summer 134 new Pentium II 400 Mhz computers were installed in Andover High School. The 59 Macintosh 
computers in the Andover High School Science Department were replaced with Windows NT Pentium II 400 Mhz 
computers. The existing English 24 computer Macintosh 575 lab located in room 322 was upgraded to 25 - Windows 
NT Pentium II 400 Mhz computers. The 24 Macintosh 575 computers were distributed into the 12 English classrooms 
and setup for network operation. The existing Andover High School Math computer lab, located in room 354, 
consisting of 24 Pentium 133 mhz computers was upgraded to 25 - Windows NT Pentium II 400 mhz computers. The 
existing Andover High School Applied Technology Pentium 120 mhz computer lab, located in room 112, was 
upgraded to 25- Windows NT Pentium II 400 mhz computers. The 49 Pentium 120 and 133 Mhz computers taken 
from rooms 1 12 and 354 were re-configured with appropriate software installed in all general classrooms and several 
Special Education classrooms throughout the high school. Forty-eight new HP 2100 TN laser printers were also 
installed in classrooms throughout the high school. With the completion of this project, every classroom in the 
Andover Public Schools has at least one computer and printer. Each of these computers has access to the computer 
network, e-mail, and the Internet. 

The 59 Macintosh computers removed from the High School Science Department were distributed to the elementary 
school classrooms and connected to the computer network, bringing the number of computers per elementary 
classroom to two. In addition, 183 Macintosh computers' RAM memory was upgraded to 32 mbs. 

Over the past year schools began using the video resources available to them. Andover High School television 
production classes operated at capacity and the elementary schools developed video programming for their assigned 
television channel. Bancroft Today and West TV were two programs developed and produced on a regular basis. 

MediaOne generously provided free cable access to its commercial CATV programming. We selected 13 
"educational" channels that were then made available to all classrooms. These channels are: WGBH, Animal Channel, 
A&E, Discovery, C-SPAN A, C-SPAN B, the Weather Channel, the History Channel, CNN, CNN Headline News, 
New England News Channel, the Spanish Channel, and the Learning Channel. In addition, the Andover Public 
Schools provided access to the Andover Education Channel, the Andover Education Training Channel, and Satellite 
programming such as the Massachusetts Corporation for Educational Telecommunication. 

We redesigned the Andover Public Schools' web site anoMbntinued to provide relevant, up-to-date information about 
the school district, schools, and school events. 



Physical Education Department 

The Physical Education Department provides instruction to all K-12 students enrolled in the school system. Adapted 
Physical Education provided instruction and service to approximately 293 students ranging in ages from preschool to 
high school. Physical Education instruction focuses on human development physical fitness, and the acquisition of 
gross and finite motor skills and specific activity skills. Hopefully, students will be motivated to plan and pursue an 
active and healthy lifestyle throughout their lives. It is the goal of this department to provide students with a 
foundation of information and knowledge that will cultivate and facilitate such a lifestyle. This program is organized 
and implemented through the medium of various physical activities. 
Curriculum/Program 

• The high school course selection format giving students the opportunity to determine some of their course of study 
continues to be well received. The personal fitness course was oversubscribed. In addition to students fulfilling the 
requirement, many students selected this course as an elective. 

• After completing the first year in the new high school fitness room, the department made initial plans to revise the 
high school Personal Fitness curriculum. This work will be conducted during the 1999-00 school year. 

• Criteria were developed for assessing student performance for each of the elementary, middle school and high 
school standards. 

• The specific benchmarks were identified by the department for assessing performance on each of the standards. 

• Compared to the national average (50 th percentile) of the President's Challenge Physical Fitness assessment, the 
overall average percentile for Andover's male students was at the 68 th percentile, while the average percentile 
scores for female students was at the 74 th percentile. Eighty-four percent of the students scored above the national 
average and 16% of the students scored at or above the 85 th percentile on all five areas assessed. 

Noteworthy Recognition: 

• The Physical Education program continued to receive recognition for quality programs. Educators from other 
school systems frequently visited to observe the program and meet with the staff. 

• Through invitation, the Adapted Physical Education staff presented their program at the National AAHPERD 
Convention held in Boston last April. The presentation was well received and attended. The staff was invited to 
present again in Florida. 

• West Elementary physical educators Arthur Iworsley and Louise Rozzi conducted their 20 th successful annual 
Jump Rope for Heart activity at West Elementary School. Their efforts last year placed them as the 8 th highest 
fund raising school in New England for this worthy cause. 

• After school activities at the different schools included intramurals, high school personal fitness and a variety of 
parent presentations and special events. 

Facilities 

• Construction of an indoor climbing wall for the Project Challenge course was completed in the high school gym. 

• A new gymnasium floor was installed at Shawsheen School. 

Athletic Department 

• Four fall teams won league championships - boys soccer, girls soccer, girls swimming, girls volleyball 

• Sprinkler systems were completed at Lovely Field and the new varsity baseball field 

• Safety work was completed on Lovely Field bleachers 

• New fencing was completed at the front of Lovely Field 

• Girls varsity swim team won State Championship, setting four new records in the process 

• The following coaches were named Division I State Coaches of the Year - Ms. Fitzgerald (girls Swimming) and 
Mr. Loschi (girls soccer) 

• Senior Citizens were recognized at School Committee meeting for contributions to Athletic Program 



■86- 



GREATER LAWRENCE TECHNICAL SCHOOL 

Participating communities in the Greater Lawrence Regional Vocational Technical High School 
School District are the City of Lawrence and the Towns of Andover, North Andover and Methuen. 
Enrollment statistics, course offerings and 1999 Highlights are as follows: 



1996-97 



1997-98 



ENROLLMENT: 

Andover students 

Placement of graduates/employment 
Business Firms with 
Coop. Work Agreements 



The following courses were offered during the 1998-99 school year: 



1998-99 



12 


16 


15 


81% 


82% 


84% 


2,075 


2,115 


2,163 



Allied Health 

CAD/Machine/Drafting 

Cosmetology 

Electrical 

Food Technology/Clothing Design 

Office Technology 



Autobody 

Construction & Building 
Culinary Arts 
Electronics 
Industrial Electronics 
Plumbing/HVAC 

1999 HIGHLIGHTS 



Automotive 

Carpentry 

Distributive Education 

Graphics 

Metal Fabrications 

Power Mechanics 



Building expansion project is on schedule, preparing for ground-breaking in Fall 2000. 
Plans have begun to build a home in collaboration with the Andover Community Trust. 
Two Academic Support grant programs were offered to students to increase academic 
proficiencies: 

• M.A.D. (Maximize Academic Development) was offered to ninth graders during after 
school hours in the Spring. 

• ReSuLTs (Reggie Summer Learning Times) was offered during the Summer as a 
preparatory program for incoming freshmen. 

The Community Service Projects Program featured thirteen technical areas completing projects 
for the four-member communities and community agencies. FY-99 projects included: 

• House building project completed by students from Carpentry, Electrical, Construction 
and Building, and Plumbing. 

• State-wide instructional seminar on surface mount technology coordinated by 
Electronics. 

• Participation in the Andover Christmas Parade. 

Fabrication of protective bags for Andover Firefighters facemasks. 

• Repair of chairs and stools for Andover Middle Schools. 

• Printing for Andover Historical Society. 

• Service and repair of Chevrolet Blazer for Andover Police Department. 

• Coordination for the annual 'Taste of Andover'. 

• Repair and refinishing of two former police cars for Town of Andover. 

• Repair and refinish S- 1 pickup truck for Town of Andover. 

• Coordination of the Andover Chagfcer of Commerce Annual Breakfast. 



ANIMAL INSPECTION 



Number of dogs quarantined for biting 

Number of animals tested for Rabies 

Number of barns inspected 

Number of beef cattle over two years 

Number of beef cattle under two years 

Number, of beef steers 

Number of beef herds (one animal constitutes a herd) 

Number of cats quarantined for Rabies 

Number of donkeys 

Number of horses (includes work & saddle horses) 

Number of ponies 

Number of goats 

Number of sheep 

Number of swine 

Number of swine herds (one animal constitutes a herd) 



1997 1998 1999 



37 


24 


23 


17 


18 


15 


21 


19 


20 


54 


58 


16 


10 


20 


8 


3 





8 


2 


3 


2 




157 


132 


2 


3 


2 


55 


55 


84 


19 


15 


21 


1 


11 


8 


4 


1 


2 


92 


121 


102 


2 


2 


2 



-88- 



ANDOVER HOUSING AUTHORITY 

The Andover Housing Authority was organized in June, 1948. On October 3, 1999, the 
AHA celebrated fifty years of housing in Andover. . The regular meetings of the Board of 
Commissioners are held on the third Thursday of every month at the Stowe Court Community 
Room. Board Members are as follows: 

Ronald Hajj - Chairperson 

Norma Villarrel - Vice Chairman 

Hartley Burnham - Governor's Appointee 

James Cuticchia - Treasurer 

Jason Fox - Asst. Treasurer 

Christine Metzemaekers - Executive Director 

The Andover Housing Authority manages 218 units of state-aided elder/disabled housing, 
56 units of state-aided family housing, 7 leased housing units under the Massachusetts Rental 
Voucher Program, 10 units under the state-aided Alternative Housing Voucher Program and 8 units 
of housing under the Massachusetts Chapter 689 program. In addition, the Authority administers 
58 Section 8 Certificates and 68 Section 8 Vouchers which are federally funded through the 
Department of Housing and Urban Development. 

STATE FUNDED PROGRAMS: Income Limits 

1 person $31,700 4 people $45,300 7 people $56,150 

2 people $36,250 5 people $48,900 8 people $59,800 

3 people $40,750 6 people $52,550 

Apartment turnover 1999: 30 Elder/Disabled units 8 Family units 

Average rent: $241 Elder/Disabled Program $340 Family Program 

FEDERALLY FUNDED PROGRAMS: Section 8 Rent Assistance Income Limits 

1 person $20,250 4 people $28,960 7 people $35,900 

2 people $23,150 5 people $31,250 8 people $38,200 

3 people $26,050 6 people $33,600 

STATE-FUNDED MODERNIZATION WORK : Completed 1999 
$86,000 Roofs/Gutters - Frye Circle 
$419,000 De-leading/Windows - Memorial Circle 

STATE-FUNDED MODERNIZATION GRANTS : Awarded in 1999 
• $578,300 Bathroom Renovations - Memorial Circle 

FEDERALLY FUNDED GRANTS RECEIVED : 

Section 8 Family Self Sufficiency Program - $47,000 



ANDOVER PRESERVATION COMMISSION 

The Andover Preservation Commission endeavors to fulfill its mission to advise the Town 
concerning the preservation of it historic and archeological resources. 

Demolition Delay Bylaw 

The Commission heard demolition requests for thirteen properties. Six were delayed six 
months, six were approved and one was continued. 

Local Historic Districts 

The Ballard Vale Local Historic District Commission continues its work in hearing proposals 
and advising residents about the design of historically sensitive changes to buildings in the district. 
Dennis Ingram, Chairman, is the Preservation Commission's representative to this Board. 

The Shawsheen Village Historic District Study Committee, Ray Flynn, Chairman, presented 
an article to the 1999 Annual Town Meeting in an effort to create a local historic district in the 
Village. The warrant article, requiring a 2/3rd's majority, was defeated by thirteen votes. The 
committee plans to resubmit the article at a future Town Meeting. The Preservation Commission 
strongly supports their effort. 

Heritage Education 

The Andover Preservation Awards were held in May of 1999 at the Memorial Hall Library 
in cooperation with the Andover Historical Society to recognize outstanding examples of 
preservation in the community. Ten property owners were recognized. 

Other Projects of Note 

• A public hearing was held to review impending demolitions in the Andover Village 
Industrial National Register Historic District along North Main Street and Stevens Street. 
The loss of these buildings will have a significant impact on the historical integrity of this 
district and threaten the viability of the district itself. 

The Community Preservation Act proposal is strongly supported by the Preservation 
Commission as a positive way to preserve historic structures, open space and quality of life 
within the Town. 

• The Chairperson of the Preservation Commission met with the other Town board 
representatives and the Town Manager in an effort to improve communication. Review 
meetings will occur quarterly. 



-90- 



Demand for housing and the resultant "mansionization" now occurring in Andover is a 
serious threat to historic residential neighborhoods. The Town does not currently have a 
means of addressing size of house to lot size to keep a newly constructed house in 
conformity with its surrounding neighborhood. The Preservation Commission is committed 
to working to develop zoning by-laws which will address this phenomenon. 



BALLARD VALE HISTORIC DISTRICT COMMISSION 

The purpose of the Commission is to ensure that changes and additions are harmonious to 
the District and to prevent changes that might detract from the aesthetic and historic values of the 
District. 



The Ballard Vale Historic Commission completed its fourth year conducting eleven regular 
meetings, one special meeting and two public hearings. 

There were fifteen applications (two commercial - seven residential) submitted to the 
Commission during the year. The applications included repair and renovation of existing buildings 
(including additions and garage replacement), fencing and emergency demolitions. 

The Commission began the year with eight of the nine positions filled with seven members 
who are residents of the district and one member, an architect, who also serves on the Andover 
Preservation Commission. The Commission would like to thank Bruce Taylor for his tireless 
efforts during his two years on the Commission. Bruce resigned in April of 1999. In June, Chuck 
Murnane (one of the original BVHDC members) was re-appointed to the Commission as an 
alternate. In July, Ron Kravette was also appointed as an alternate. 

In the coming year, the Commission hopes to complete its plans for the posting of five signs 
to mark entry into the Ballard Vale Historic District. Work will continue on development of 
procedures and revision of the rules and regulations. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Dennis Ingram, Chairperson 

Diane Derby, Vice Chairperson 

Sherron Heller 

Perry Raffi 

Ron Abraham 

Chris Huntress 

Edward Morrissey 

Charles Murnane, Jr. 

Ron Kravette 

-91- 



MARGARET G. TOWLE FUND 

Under the terms of her will, the late Margaret G. Towle, long-time resident of Andover, 
bequeathed the residue of her estate to the Town of Andover, to be held and administered by it as 
a permanent trust fund. This trust is now known as the Margaret G. Towle Fund. Mrs. Towle 
stipulated in her will that the income from this fund "be devoted to the assistance of the procurement 
of assistance for worthy persons residing in the Town of Andover who may be in need of aid, 
comfort or support on account of old age, disability or unemployment." 

The Fund is administered by a group of three Trustees, chosen by the Town Manager with 
the approval of the Board of Selectmen, which has disbursed the income from the Fund in 
accordance with the terms of Mrs. Towle's will. The cases are referred to the Trustees by private 
charitable groups and organizations, the Clergy and interested individuals. 

During the twelve month period, the Trustees acted on sixteen (16) cases, disbursing 
$15,838.59 on approved cases. Only the income of the Fund is available. The principal of 
$345,825.50 and a substantial portion of the current income is invested under the direction of the 
Trustees. All disbursements are made by the Town Treasurer upon vouchers approved by the 
Trustees. 

Balance of Income as of Dec. 31, 1998 $147,475.22 

Receipts -1999 30.332.80 

$177,808.02 
Disbursements - 1999 15.838.59 

Balance of Income as of Dec. 31, 1999 $161,969.43 



JOHN CORNELL FUEL ASSISTANCE FUND 

The John Cornell Fuel Assistance Fund was established by Article 17 of the 1893 Annual 
Town Meeting. Five thousand dollars was left to the Town to be used for the needy and poor to 
purchase wood or coal. In 1995 the trust documents were modified by the Probate Court of 
Massachusetts to permit the use of all types of fuel for heating, cooking or electrical purposes. 
Three Trustees, chosen on a staggered basis, by vote at the Annual Town Meeting, administer the 
funds. The Trustees approved no applications during the year. 



Balance on hand 6/30/98 $40,466.6 1 

Income -FY-1999 2,697.04 

Expenditures - FY- 1 999 -0- 

Balance as of 6/30/99 $43,163.65 



-92- 



TRUSTEES OF PUNCHARD FREE SCHOOL 
ANDOVER, MASSACHUSETTS 

STATEMENT FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31,1999 





1/1/99 


CAPITAL ACCOUNT 
SUMMARY OF TRANSACTIONS 


Money Market Fund 
Securities @ Book 
Res.for Cost/Mkt. 






PRINCIPAL FUND 




12/31/99 


Money Market Fund 
Securities @ Book 


$7,181.99 
252,731.78 


-Gain/(Loss) - Sale of Securities 
-Brokerage Fees/Tax 
-Reinvest Mutual Fd. Cap. Gains 
-Transfers from Reserve Fund 
- Adj. to lower of Cost/Market 

Increase 


$2,120.00 

(15.00) 

8,090.23 

10,615.71 

(9,643.92) 


$0.00 
280,724.71 
(9,643.92) 




$259,913.77 


$11,167.02 


$271,080.79 



OPERATING ACCOUNTS 
(RESERVE FUND & CASH ACCOUNT) 
INCOME 



Savings Account 
Checking Account 
Money Market Fund 



$5,993.36 Dividends Received 
3,517.14 Interest Received-Bonds/Notes 
1 1 ,790.02 Capital Gain Distributions 
Interest Received-Other 



$21,300.52 



$9,680.13 Savings Account $6,257.37 

2,181.10 Checking Account 4,501.87 

1 ,481 .00 Money Market Fund 6,484.29 
1,262.28 



Income Total 


$14,604.51 


EXPENSES 




Andover High School Projects 

Misc. Operating Expenses 


$7,186.29 
859.50 


Expense Total 


$8,045.79 


Net Income 
TRANSFERS TO PRINCIPAL: 


$6,558.72 


-10% of Income (1/1-12/31/99) 
-Unexpended School Proj. Funds 
-Add'l Funds Invested 


1,461.00 
3,327.33 (7/1/98 
5,827.38 


Decrease 


($4,056.99) 



$17,243.53 



6/30/99) 



$281 ,214.29 TOTAL PRINCIPAL AND OPERATING ACCOUNTS 



$288,324.32 



-93- 



TRUSTEES OF PUNCHARD FREE SCHOOL 
ANDOVER, MASSACHUSETTS 



FUNDS ANALYSIS AS OF DECEMBER 31, 1999 
CAPITAL ACCOUNT 

PRINCIPAL FUND 



MARKET VALUE 
OVER/(UNDER) 





BOOK VALUE 


MARKET VALUE 


BOOK VALUE 


CASH 








CASH/MONEY MARKET FUND 


$0.00 


$0.00 


$0.00 


MUTUAL FUNDS 








3,137.710 Shs. Delaware Decatur Equity Income Fund, CI. B 


67,077.00 


52,054.61 


(15,022.39) 


8,247.417 Shs. Federated High Income Bond Fund.CI.B 


95,000.00 


86,267.98 


(8,732.02) 


4,550.412 Shs. Franklin Utilities Fund, CI C 


46,544.42 


39,042.54 


(7,501.88) 


1,276.183 Shs. Pioneer Growth Fund, CI. B 


23,469.95 


24,643.09 


1,173.14 


682.639 Shs. PSE Technology 100 Index Fund 


19,782.89 


25,353.21 


5,570.32 


774.316 Shs. Seligman Comm. & Info Fund, CI B 


18,976.10 


33,613.06 


14,636.96 


TOTAL MUTUAL FUNDS 


$270,850.36 


$260,974.49 


($9,875.87) 


SECURITIES - BONDS/NOTES 




$10,000 IBM Note,7.250%,Due 11/1/02 


9,874.35 


10,106.30 


231.95 


TOTAL BONDS/NOTES 


$9,874.35 


$10,106.30 


$231.95 


TOTAL SECURITIES 


$280,724.71 
(9,643.92) 


$271,080.79 


($9,643.92) 


RESERVE FOR LOWER OF COST/MARKE1 


$9,643.92 


TOTAL PRINCIPAL FUND 


$271,080.79 


$271,080.79 


$0.00 


RESERVE FUND 


$6,257.37 






ANDOVER BANK CD ACCOUNT 




MONEY MARKET CASH FUND 


6,484.29 


$12,741.66 
$4,501.87 




TOTAL RESERVE FUND 


$12,741.66 
$4,501.87 


$0.00 


CASH FUND 




CHECKING ACCOUNT - BankBoston 


$0.00 


TOTAL FUNDS 


$288,324.32 


$288,324.32 


$0.00 


Increase in Market Value from 1/1/99 




$7,568.12 





-94- 



TRUSTEES OF PUNCHARD FREE SCHOOL 
ANDOVER, MASSACHUSETTS 

STATEMENT FOR THE YEAR ENDING: DECEMBER 31 ,1 999 

SCHOLARSHIPS AND SPECIAL FUNDS 







ADDITIONS 


CURRENT 










BALANCE 


TO 


YEAR 


SUB 


LESS 


BALANCE 




1/1/99 


PRINCIPAL 


NET INCOME 


TOTAL 


AWARDS 


12/31/99 


H.W.& M.P.BARNARD 


$2,675.02 




$110.36 


$2,785.38 


$1,675.00 


$1,110.38 


J.W.BARNARD 


8,912.36 




919.75 


9,832.11 


200.00 


9,632.11 


ALICE M.BELL 


1,344.89 




138.77 


1,483.66 


45.00 


1,438.66 


THOMAS BLACK 


17,131.31 




1,381.82 


18,513.13 


1,000.00 


17,513.13 


EDNAG.CHAPIN 


3,078.55 




317.68 


3.39623 


100.00 


329623 


FRED W.DOYLE 


13,212.18 




1,354.76 


14,566.94 


1,000.00 


13,566.94 


WARREN F.DRAPER 


1,986.54 




204.80 


2,191.34 


70.00 


2,121.34 


WILLIAM G.GOLDSMITH 


2,839.09 




294.84 


3,133.93 


0.00 


3,133.93 


ELIZABETH T.GUTTERSON 


1,358.53 




142.71 


1,50124 


45.00 


1,45624 


MYRON E.GUTTERSON 


1,562.38 




162.16 


1,724.54 


0.00 


1,724.54 


ANDOVER GRANGE 


3,338.03 




344.91 


3,682.94 


100.00 


3,582.94 


NATHAN C. HAMBLIN 


20,645.80 




1,115.89 


21,761.69 


1,000.00 


20,761.69 


MARGARET F. HINCHCUFFE 


38,976.67 




4,016.96 


42,993.63 


2,000.00 


40.993.63 


PUNCHARD TRUSTEES 


12,641.08 




1,299.32 


13,940.40 


440.00 


13,500.40 


ANDOVER SERVICEMEN 


33,220.19 




3,419.02 


36,63921 


2.000.00 


34,63921 


HENRY WYATT 


9,092.05 


1,671.00 -A) 


1.037.81 


11,800.86 


500.00 


11.300.86 


AF.B.&WATROW 


84,986.97 




6,175.87 


91,162.84 


2,000.00 


89.162.84 


RES. FOR LOWER OF COST/MARKET 


0.00 




(1,053.18) 


(1,053.18) 




(1,053.18) 




$257,001.64 


$1,671.00 


$21,384.26 


$280,056.90 


$12,175.00 


$267,881.90 



SUMMARY-INCOME/(EXPENSE) 

Interest Income 
Dividend Income 
Capital Gain Distributions 
Gain/(Loss) on Sale of Securities 
Brokerage Fees/Taxes 
Adj. for Lower of Cost/Market 

NET INCOME 



(A- Add'l funds contributed by Town Employees- 7/99. 



$4,388.75 

7,134.15 

9,522.11 

1,407.43 

(15.00) 

(1,053.18) 



$21,38426 



FUNDS HELD 



ANDOVER BANK CHECKING ACCT. 

ANDOVER BANK CDS (2) 

ALLIANCE MONEY MARKET FUND 

1 ,416.794 Shs. DELAWARE DECATUR INCOME FUND 

7,386.048 Shs. FEDERATED HIGH INCOME BOND FUND 

1 ,105.054 Shs. TEMPLETON GROWTH FUND 

ALLIANCE MONEY MARKET/ TROW FUND 

2,249.548 Shs. PIONEER EQUITY INCOME/TROW FUND 

1 .571 .820 Shs. PIONEER CAPITAL GROWTH/TROW FUND 

$5,000 IBM NOTE.7250%,1 1/1/02 

RESERVE FOR LOWER OF COST/MARKET 

TOTAL 



MARKET 


BOOK 




VALUE 


VALUE 


Variance 


$10.00 


$10.00 




28,507.61 


28,507.61 


$0.00 


11,526.07 


11,526.07 


0.00 


23,504.61 


29,861.10 


(6,356.49) 


77.258.06 


84,000.00 


(6,741 .94) 


21,829.40 


20,905.61 


923.79 


11,101.44 


11,101.44 


0.00 


60.94026 


48.694.11 


12,246.15 


28,151.30 


29,36729 


(1,215.99) 


5.053.15 


4,961.85 


91.30 




(1,053.18) 


1,053.18 



$267,881.90 



$267,881.90 



$0.00 



-95- 



TOWN OF ANDOVER, MASSACHUSETTS 

BALANCE SHEET 

JUNE 30, 1SS9 



GENERAL 
FUND 



ENTERPRISE 



WATER 



SEWER 



CAPITAL 
PROJECT 



TREASURER'S 
TRUST FUNDS 



GRAND TOTAL 



ASSETS 



Cash and Equivelants 
Other Investments 
Accounts Redevabtes 

Property Taxes 

Exdse Taxes 

Water & Sewer Charges 

Tax Liens 

Deterred Tax 

Departmental-Revenue 

Tax Foreclosure 

Special Assessments 

Due from other Governments 

Total Cash & RedevaWes 



9,341,735.97 1.938.657.22 



1,012.478.89 
601,259.83 

1.409.885.54 

76,261.00 

250.082.39 

200,714.26 

6.345.96 



1,617,748.41 



26.204.18 



702,937.82 10.717,524.63 



789.552.46 



1.558,541.01 



8.063.462.15 



344,120.46 



32.322.858 80 



1.012.478.89 

601559.83 

2.407,300.87 

1,409.885.54 

76561.00 

250,082.39 

200.71456 

376.670.60 

81.787.17 



12,898,763.84 3,582.609.81 1.836.610.74 10.717,524.63 



1,640.328.18 8.063.462.15 



0.00 38.73959935 



Other Assets 
Deposits 

Amounts to be Provided for. 
Long Term Debt 
Total Assets 



321.500.00 321.500.00 



66.894.550.00 66.894.550 00 



12.898.763.84 3,582.609.81 1.836.610.74 10.717,524.63 



1.640,328.18 8.384,962.15 66.894,550.00 105,955.349 35 



LIABILITIES AND RESERVES 
Warrants Payable 
Accrued Payrol Withholdings 
Reserve for Abatements 
Deferred Revenue 
Due to Other Governments 
Unclaimed Items 
Guarantee Deposits 
Bonds Payable-Inside Debt Limit 
Bonds Payabte-Outside Debt Limit 
Retirement of Bonds 
Lease Obligations 

Total UabiKes 



236.84756 

(960.512.49) 

(2,346,515.38) (1,643,952.59) (1.133,672.92) 

1.25 

(15.748.68) 

(27,502.74) (5.223.49) 



(122,572.79) (122.572.79) 

236.84756 

(960.512.49) 

(81.787.17) (5505.928.06) 

155 

(15.748.68) 

(32.726.23) 

(52.178.200.00) (52.178.200.00) 

(12.447.500.00) (12.447.500.00) 

(2503.850.00) (2503.850.00) 

(65,000.00) (65.000.00) 



(3.113.430.78) (1.643.952.59) (1.138.896.41) 



0.00 



(81.787.17) (122.572.79) (66,894.550.00) (72,995.189.74) 



Fund Balances 

Unreserved 
Reserved for 

Continued Appropriations 
Encumbrances 
Reserve for Expenditures 
Designated for 

Appropriation Deficits 
Unprovided for Abates & Exempts 
Total Fund Balances 
Total Liab. & Fund Balance 



(5.107,154.62) (1,693,57052) (639,164.48) 



(896.734.60) 
(2,587.472.60) 
(1.204,000.00) 



(245.087.00) 



(9.545,714.60) 
(58,549.86) (1,205,159.72) 



(1,498.924.94) (8.262,389.36) 



(59.616.07) 



(17,201503.62) 

(10,442.44950) 

(4,155.88555) 

(1.204.000.00) 

0.00 

33.349.69 



10,028.76 










10.028.76 


(9,785,333.06) 


(1,938,65752) 


(697.714.34) (10.717.524.63) 


(1.558,541.01) 


(8,262.389.36) 


0.00 (32.960.159.62) 


(12.898.763.84) 


(3,582.609.81) 


(1.836,610.75) (10,717.524.63) 


(1.640,328.18) 


(8,384.962.15) 


(66.894.550.00) (105,955.349.36) 



-96- 



Town of Andover, Massachusetts 

Combined Statement of Revenues, Expenditures 

and Changes in Fund Balances 

All Governmental Fund Types and Expendable Trust Funds 

June 30, 1999 















Fiduciary 






Governmental Fund Type 




Proprietary Fund Type 


Fund Type 


Total 






Capital 


Special 


Water 


Sewer 


Expendable 


(Memorandum 




General 


Projects 


Revenue 


Enterprise 


Enterprise 


Trust 


Only) 


Revenues: 
















Real Estate 


56,134,009.62 












56,134,009.62 


Personal Property 


1,466,565.51 












1,466,565.51 


Tax Title Redemptions 


431,685.22 












431,685.22 


Motor Vehicle Excise 


3,614,255.31 












3,614,255.31 


Intergovernmental 


8,790,616.70 












8,790,616.70 


Cither Excise 


794,350.00 












794,350.00 


Penalties and Interest 


597,446.57 












597,446.57 


Payments in Lieu of Taxes 


4,032.00 












4,032.00 


Charges for Services - Water 








6,030,007.38 






6,030,007.38 


Charges for Services - Sewer 










2,145,581.55 




2,145,581.55 


Fees 


203,693.65 




92,991.91 








296,685.56 


DMM Facilities Rental 


75,589.80 












75,589.80 


Departmental Revenue - Schools 


103,654.53 












103,654.53 


Departmental Revenue - Libraries 


28,288.17 












28,288.17 


Departmental Revenue - Cemeteries 


31,565.00 




13,200.00 








44,765.00 


Departmental Revenue- Recreation 


385,226.39 




304,182.85 








1,136,919.83 


Departmental Revenue- Ambulance 


447,510.59 












447,510.59 


Other Departmental Revenue 


442,828.95 




107,915.63 








550,744.58 


Licenses and Permits 


893.789.43 












893,789.43 


Special Assessments 


1,033.62 






3,063.01 


65,384.63 




69,481.26 


Fines and Forfeits 


291,917.10 












291,917.10 


Investment Income 


943,410.25 




2,658.97 


77,959.12 


29,316.35 


568,441.63 


1,621,786.32 


Other 


159,590.51 


83,508.08 


3,941,846.22 








4,184,944.81 
0.00 


Total Revenues 


75,841,058.92 


83,508.08 


4,462.795.58 


6,111,029.51 


2,240,282.53 


568,441.63 


89,754,626.84 


Expenditures 
















General Government 


2,552,211.46 




536.35 








2,552,747.81 


Community Development 


1,102,698.11 


19,470.14 


218,491.92 








1,340,660 17 


Community Service 


1,207,536.90 


104,566.61 


361,787.03 








1,673,890.54 


Municipal Maintenance 


4,875,143.98 


626,458.01 


68,782.29 








5,570,384.28 


Public Safety 


8,769,442.71 


698,127.13 


954,653.09 








10,422,222.93 


Water Enteprises 




451,755.38 




2,323,431.57 






2,775,186.95 


Sewer Enterprise 




609,170.29 


7,809.00 




1,333,544.97 




1,950.524.26 


Public Works 


4,905,287.19 


793,110.09 


688,862.02 








6.387.259.30 


Library 


1,963,392.93 




20,213.84 








1,983,606 77 


School 


33,956,257.50 


1,117,617.60 


1,866,535.06 








36,940.410 16 


Fixed 














0.00 


Insurance 














0.00 


Debt Service 


9,667,737.74 












9,667,737.74 


Retirement 


3,063,799.70 












3,063,79970 


State & County Assessments 


982,642.89 












982,64289 


Unclassified 


425,037.27 




16,772.00 






4,950,173.38 


5,391,982.65 


Total Expenditures 


73,471,188.38 


4,420,275.25 


4,204,442.60 


2,323,431.57 


1,333,544.97 


4,950,173.38 


90,703,056 15 


Other Financing Sources (Uses) 














0.00 


Transfers 


465,784.41 




(74,933.41) 


(3,055,158.00) 


(720,693.00) 


3,385,000.00 


0.00 


Debt Activity 




13,710,000.00 










13,710,000.00 


Other 














0.00 




(2,925.496.82) 


(3,700,000.00) 








1,566,687.88 


(5,058,808.94) 


Total Other Financing 
















Sources (Uses) 


(2,459,712.41) 


10,010,000.00 


(74,933.41) 


(3,055,158.00) 


(720,693.00) 


4,951,687.88 


8.651,191.06 



Excess (Deficiency) of Revenues over 
(Under) expenditures and other 
Financing Sources (Uses) 



Fund Balance July 1, 1998 
Fund Balance June 30, 1999 



(89,841.87) 
9,875,174.93 



5,673.232.83 
5,044,291.80 



9,785,33306 10,717,52463 



183,419.57 



1,375,121.44 



1,558,541.01 



732,439.94 



1,206,217.28 



1,938,657.22 



186.044.56 



511,669.78 



697,714.34 



569,956.13 



7,692,433 26 



8,262.38939 



7,255,251.16 



25.704.90849 



32,960.15965 



-97- 



TOWN OF ANDOVER, MASSACHUSETTS 

RECAP OF GENERAL FUND - BUDGET 

FISCAL YEAR ENDED 06/30/99 



CONTINUED 
APPROP 



APPROP 
(ORIGINAL) 



OFFSET 
RECEIPTS 



RECEIPTS 



RESERVE 
FUND 



OTHER 
(STM) 



TOTAL 
AVAILABLE 



EXPENDED 



TRANS TO 
UNREFDBL 



CONTINUED 
APPROP 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 
Personal Services 
Other Expenses 



117,121.30 



1,421,266.00 
864.717.00 



7,833.72 10.675.00 



1,421.266.00 
1.000.347.02 



1,397,624.85 
818,646.83 



117,121.30 2,285,983.00 



7,833.72 10.675.00 



0.00 



2.421.613.02 



2.216.271.68 



19,641.15 
40,300.13 



59.941.28 



4,000.00 
141,400.06 



145.400.06 



COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT 
Personal Services 
Other Expenses 



48,941.00 



48,941.00 



910,020.00 
164,190.00 



13,000.00 



923,020 00 
213,131.00 



871,772.06 
172,267.39 



1,074.210.00 



0.00 



0.00 



0.00 



1,136,151.00 



1,044,039.45 



51,247.94 
13,757.36 



65.005.30 



0.00 
27,106.25 



27,106.25 



COMMUNITY SERVICES 
Personal Services 
Other Expenses 



8,949.91 



8,949.91 



154,801.00 
48,255.00 



173,250.00 
226,750.00 



5,504.73 



333.555.73 

283.954.91 



333,555.73 
267,711.61 



203,056.00 400,000.00 



0.00 5,504.73 



617,510.64 



601,267.34 



0.00 
665.37 



665.37 



0.00 
15.577.93 



ELDER SERVICES 
Personal Services 
Other Expenses 



5,302.35 



5,302.35 



141,067.00 
159,576.00 



226,725.00 



186.21 
194.95 



367,978.21 
165,073.30 



367,890.74 
145.806.12 



300,643.00 226,725.00 



381.16 



533,051.51 



513,696.86 



87.47 
6,434.44 



6,521.91 



0.00 
12,832.74 



12,832.74 



MUNICIPAL MAINTENANCE 
Personal Services 
Other Expenses 



2,043.40 
850,840.29 



1.990,698.00 
2,484.260.00 



170.000.00 



154.80 
10,293.08 45,459.07 



2,162,896.20 
3,390,852.44 



2.212,046.07 
2,658,097.91 



(52,828.72) 
130,813.10 



852,883.69 4,474,958.00 170,000.00 



10,447.88 45,459.07 



0.00 



5,553,748.64 



4,870,143.98 



77,984.38 



3.678.85 
601,941.43 



605,620.28 



PUBLIC SAFETY 
Personal Services 
Other Expenses 



51.386.18 



7,828,277.00 
543,973.00 



430,677.00 
21,280.00 



4,201.05 23,800.00 



8,258,954.00 
644.640.23 



8,199,715.14 
568,444.15 



21,780.41 
363.81 



51,386.18 8,372,250.00 451,957.00 



4,201.05 23.800.00 



0.00 



8,903,594.23 



8,768.159.29 



22,144.22 



37,458.45 
75,832.27 



113,290.72 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS 

Personal Services 2,440,516.00 

Other Expenses 591,949.30 6,517,275.00 



591,949.30 8,957,791.00 



2.440,516.00 
7,109,224.30 



2.313.095.83 
6,193,399.10 



127,420.17 
587,155.58 



0.00 



0.00 



0.00 



0.00 



9,549,740.30 



8,506,494.93 



714.575.75 



0.00 
328.669.62 



328.669.62 



LIBRARY 
Personal Services 
Other Expenses 

SCHOOL 
Personal Services 
Other Expenses 
GLRVTHS 

UNCLASSIFIED 
Other Expenses 

FIXED EXPENSES 
Debt Service 
Stabilization 
Insurance 

Health Insurance Fund 
Retirement 



45,162.51 



45.162.51 



389,385.39 
364,663.68 



1,381,146.00 
540,404.00 



2,693.14 



1,381,146.00 
636,259.65 



1,368.385.71 
595,007.22 



12.760.29 
0.00 



1,921,550.00 



48,000.00 



27,387,862.00 40.000.00 

6,059,290.00 50.000.00 

117,332.00 



2,693.14 



7,128.00 
39,453.47 



0.00 



21.00 



0.00 



424,225.00 



2,017,405.65 

27,824,375.39 

6,937,632.15 

117.353.00 



1,963.392.93 

27,510,692.48 

6,328,212.02 

117,353.00 



12,760.29 

(110,920.19) 

149,192.36 

0.00 



0.00 



776,500.00 



0.00 



9,622,929.00 

60,000.00 

35,793.95 516,400.00 

3,325,000.00 



0.00 (130,268.54) 
44,808.74 



0.00 



0.00 
41,252.43 



41,252.43 

424,603.10 

460,227.77 

0.00 



754.049.07 


33.564,484.00 


90,000.00 


46,581.47 21.00 


424,225.00 


34,879,360.54 


33,956,257.50 


38.272.17 


884.830.87 




776,500.00 




(130,268.54) 




646,231.46 


0.00 


69.731.46 


576.500.00 



646,231.46 


0.00 


69,731.46 


576.500.00 


9,667,737.74 


9,667,737.74 


0.00 


0.00 


60,000.00 


60,000.00 


0.00 


0.00 


552,193.95 


412,973.78 


10,351.91 


128.868.26 


3.325.000.00 


3,325,000.00 


0.00 


0.00 


3,089,401.52 


3,063,799.70 


25,601 .82 


0.00 





3,076,772.00 




12.629.52 






3,089,401.52 


3,063,799.70 


25,601 .82 


0.00 


35,793.95 


16,601,101.00 


0.00 


12,629.52 


44,808.74 


0.00 


16,694.333.21 


16,529,511.22 


35.953.73 


128,868.26 


2,511,539.26 


78,532,526.00 


1.399,682.00 


84,767.94 


0.00 


424,225.00 


82,952,740.20 


78,969,235.18 


1,103,555.86 


2,879,949,16 



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TOWN OF ANDOVER, MASSACHUSETTS 

ANALYSIS OF LONG TERM DEBT AUTHORIZED 

FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1999 

(REFLECTED TO SHOW NOVEMBER 15, 1999 BOND ISSUE) 



ARTICLE 



PROJECT NAME 



AUTHORIZATION 

AMOUNT 

JUNE 30, 1999 



BONDING 



AUTHORIZATION 

REMAINING 

NOVEMBER 15, 1999 



ART 18, 1985 SEWER SYSTEM IMPROVEMENTS 

ART 26, 1 995 FIELD IMPROVEMENTS 

ART 47, 1996 SHAWSHEEN FIELD IMPROVEMENTS 

ART 24, 1997 SENIOR CITIZEN CENTER 

ART 31 , 1998 SEWER PLANS - SOUTH MAIN STREET AREA 

ART 34, 1 998 SEWER PLANS - ROGERS BROOK 

ART 1 6, 1 999 PUBLIC SAFETY CENTER 

ART 19, 1999 MIDD/EL SCHOOL DESIGN 

ART 20, 1999 SEWER DESIGN - FOREST HILLS 

ART 41 . 1 999 SEWER CONSTRUCTION - SO MAIN ST 

ART 42, 1999 SEWER CONSTRUCTION - ROGERS BROOK 

ART 43, 1999 SEWER CONSTRUCTION - BEACON STREET 

ART 44, 1999 LANDFILL CLOSURE 

ART 45, 1999 TOWN/SCHOOL BUILDING INPROVEMENTS 

ART 74. 1999 MAIN STREET STREETSCAPE 

ART 83. 1 999 SIDEWALK CONSTRUCTION - SALEM STREET 



1,160,000.00 
384.000.00 
4,000.00 
349,552.00 
700,000.00 
200,000.00 
12.900.000.00 

2.517.000.00 

250,000.00 

22.500.000.00 

4,300.000.00 
225.000.00 

2.200.000.00 

1,000,000.00 
304.000.00 
150,000.00 



700.000.00 

200.000.00 

2,000,000.00 

250,000.00 



225,000.00 



1,000,000.00 



1.160,000.00 

384.000.00 

4.000.00 

349,552.00 

0.00 

0.00 

10.900,000.00 

2,517,000.00 

0.00 

22,500,000.00 

4,300,000.00 

0.00 

2,200,000.00 

0.00 

304,000.00 

150,000.00 



49,143,552.00 



44,768,552.00 



-114- 



TOWN OF ANDOVER, MASSACHUSETTS 

ANALYSIS OF RESERVE ACCOUNT AND COMPENSATION FUND 

YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1999 

RESERVE FUND 



Transfers by Authority of the 
Finance Committee: 



Transfers by Vote of Town Meeting, 
April , 1998 



99-1 Plant and Facilities 
99-2 Plant and Facilities 
99-3 Public Safety 
99-4 General Government 
96-5 GLRVTHS 
99-6 Debt Service 



1,114.00 
34,345.07 
23,800.00 
10,675.00 
21.00 
44,808.74 



From Taxation 



200,000.00 



Transferred to Surplus 



85,236.19 



200,000.00 



200,000.00 



COMPENSATION FUND 



Transfers by Authority of the 
Board of Selectmen: 



Transfers by Vote of the Town Meeting, 
April , 1998 



Carryforward to Fiscal 2000 



576,500.00 



From Taxation 



576,500.00 



576,500.00 



Balance to Surplus 



0.00 



576,500.00 



576,500.00 



-115- 



TRUST-CEMETERY -SPECIAL FUNDS 

IN CUSTOOY OF THE TOWN TREASURER 

YEAR ENDING JUNE 30. 1999 









BALANCE 


FUND 


BENEFICIARY 


PRINCIPAL 


JULY 1. 1998 


M V LIBRARY CONSORTIUM , 


LIBRARY 




96.037 62 


CHRIST CHURCH 




7.610.00 


8.07434 


WEST PARISH 




2.31000 


2,450 98 


ROGERS BROOK 








SUNSET ROCK 








ST AUGUSTINES 




650.00 


689 66 



DEPOSITS 



INCOME 



ADJUSTMENT 



4.996 10 
538 15 
163.30 



BALANCE 
JUNE 30. 1999 

101.033 72 

8.612 49 

2.614 28 

000 

0.00 

73563 



SPRING GROVE 



UNEMPLOYMENT COMPENSATE 



EMMA J LINCOLN 
EMILINE LINCOLN 
CONSERVATION FUND 



J GREELEY 



STABILIZATION 



INSURANCE 



TOWN INSURANCE HEALTH 



FARRINGTON 
BALLARDVALE MEMORIAL 
ALLEN 
DRAPER 
RICHARDSON 
A. & A.V LINCOLN- 
SPRING GROVE CEMETERY 
RAFTON (INTEREST) 
RAFTON (PRINCIPAL) 
CONROY 

AMERICAN LEGION 
CHRIS MAYNARD BOOKS 
SMART 

MARGARET G. TOWLE 
SUNSET ROCK EXT 
JOHN CORNELL 
MARGARET G TOWLE 
DAVID & LUCY SHAW 
W.L. RAYMOND 
A.J. LINCOLN 
E.I RAYMOND 
TAYLOR 
CD WOOD 

CD&P-ROGERS BROOK 
TOWN 400TH CELEBRATION 
POLICE DRUG ACCOUNT 
ESTATE SP. WHITE 
HOLT 



VICOR SEWER DEPOSIT 







107.252.60 


0.00 


5.74352 


00 


000 


112.996 12 






56,334.73 










56.334 73 




275,000.00 


762.423.84 


26.400.00 


31,712.29 


140.000 00 




680,536 13 






818.758.57 


26.400 00 


31.712.29 


140.000.00 


0.00 


736.870.86 






261.898 15 




13.62457 






275,52272 






261.898.15 


0.00 


13.624.57 


000 


0.00 


275.522.72 


A.V.I.S 




65391 




43.58 






697.49 


A.V.I.S 


1.000.00 


1 .200.72 




80.03 






1.280 75 


CONSERVATION 




39,168.01 




2,610.50 






41.778.51 






41.022.64 


000 


2.734.11 


0.00 


0.00 


43.75675 


LIBRARY 


5.000 00 


5,302.12 




353.38 






5,65550 






5.302.12 


0.00 


353 38 


000 


000 


5.655.50 


TOWN 




1.618.849.03 


60,000.00 


111.699 27 






1.790,548.30 






1.618,849.03 


60.000.00 


111.699.27 


0.00 


0.00 


1.790.548.30 


TOWN 




234,734.57 




12,211 47 






246.94604 






234,734.57 


0.00 


12,211.47 


0.00 


0.00 


246.94604 






378.660.00 






57.160.00 




321.500 00 






2,623.652.39 


4.828.226.45 


100,311.89 


4.561.942.86 


40.029.38 


2.950.21849 






3.002.312.39 


4.828,226.45 


100.311 89 


4.619.102.86 


40.029.38 


3.271.71849 


FLOWERS 


600.00 


1.211.48 




80.75 






1.292.23 


FLOWERS 


532.88 


966.20 




64 40 






1.030 60 


FLOWERS 


200.00 


231.95 




1545 






247 40 


SCHOOL 


1.058.93 


10.396.96 




692.95 






11.089 91 


SHAWSHEEN SC 


1.000.00 


3.967 92 




264.47 






4,23239 


SPELLING BEE 


1,000.00 


5.423 19 




361.45 






5.784 64 


PRINCIPAL 




25.809.61 




2.419.37 


1.404.99 




26.82399 






1.576.23 


96.00 


106.64 






1.778 87 


SCHOLARSHIP 


598.50 


598.50 










598.50 


HIGH SCHOOL 


291.71 


1.050.12 




69 98 






1.120 10 


HIGH SCHOOL 


200.00 


774.35 




51.61 






825 96 


SOUTH SCHOOL 


3,987 68 


3.969.05 


200.00 


260 63 


171.25 




4.258 43 


FLOWERS 


1,000.00 


9.427.43 




628.34 






10.05577 


INCOME 




153.065.89 




30.704.56 


23,105.52 




160.664 93 


HAMMOND WAY 




5.228.87 




132.23 




5,361.10 


(0.00) 


WOOD & COAL 


5.000.00 


40.466.61 




2.697.04 






43.163 65 


PRINCIPAL 


345,825.50 


345.825.50 










345.625.50 


WELFARE 


10.000.00 


32.391.63 




2.114 16 


1,000.00 




33.50S79 


WELFARE 


7.845.81 


33.838.10 




2.232.92 


500.00 




35.571 02 


NEEDY CHILDRE 


5.000.00 


15.960.53 




830.31 






16,790 84 


WELFARE/FLOW 


1,302.77 


1.703.33 




113.52 






1.816 85 


FUEL 


300.00 


1.246.60 




83.06 






1.329 68 


MEMORIAL 




827.657.01 




55,162.21 






882.819 22 






4.154 .88 




60.66 




4.215.54 


000 






5,185.92 




345.64 






5.531.56 


POLICE 




12,737.24 


653.00 


280.42 


2.360 00 




11.310 66 


SPRING GROVE 


5.766.63 


10.882.39 




566.11 






1 1 .448 50 


SCHOOL 


81.95 


47482 




31.66 






506 48 






1.556.222.31 


949.00 


100.370.56 


28,541.76 


9.576.64 


1.619.423 47 




5.000 00 


0.00 


5,000.00 


223.49 




5,22349 


00 



5.000.00 



22349 



5,223.49 



WORKERS COMP TRUST FUND 

1999 CONTRIBUTION 

1998 CONTRIBUTION 

1997 CONTRIBUTION 

1996 CONTRIBUTION 

1995 CONTRIBUTION 



CEMETERY SALE OF LOTS ADJUSTMENT 



MV LIBRARY CONSORTIUM (TRUST AND AGENCY) 
CHRIST CHURCH 
WEST PARISH 
ST AUGUSTINES 



A/P DUR GE RE: CEMETERY PERPETUAL CARES 



DUE TO GENERAL FUND 



LONG TERM VARIANCE TO BE CLEARED 



73.792.00 

32.000.00 

146.500.00 

8.076.00 




95.653.26 


74.998.00 
8,076.00 




95.653.26 
73.792.00 
32.000 00 
71.502.00 
0.00 


260.368.00 
(178,987 84) 


0.00 


95.653.26 


83.074.00 


0.00 
(178.987 84) 


272,947.26 
000 


(178.987.84) 

(96.037.62) 

(8,074.34) 

(2,450.98) 

(68966) 


0.00 

0.00 
0.00 

0.00 
000 


000 

(4.996.10) 

(538.15) 

(163.30) 

(45 97) 


0.00 

0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
000 


(178.987.84) 


0.00 

(101.03372) 

(8.612.49) 

(2.614.28) 

(735.63) 


(107,252 60) 
(70.000.00) 


0.00 


(5,743.52) 
70.000.00 


0.00 


0.00 


(112.996.12) 
000 


(70.000.00) 
1 141.953.32 


0.00 


70,000.00 
29,547.34 


0.00 

79.45476 


0.00 
92.045 90 


0.00 
0.00 


- 1 iO.-953.32 

(73.19) 


0.00 


29,547.34 


79.454.76 


92.045.90 
926.81 


0.00 
(1.000.00) 


(73.19) 


000 


0.00 


0.00 


926 61 


(1.000.00) 


7.692.36007 


4.920.57545 


568.441 63 


4.950.173.38 


131 185 62) 


8.262.38939 



ANNUAL TOWN ELECTION 
MARCH 23, 1999 



ANNUAL TOWN ELECTION TOTAL: 2424 

The total number of ballots cast was 2424, viz: 

Precinct 1 2175 Precinct 2 2575 Precinct 3 2298 Precinct 4 2493 
Precinct5 2650 Precinct 6 2497 Precinct 7 2302 Precinct 8 2537 





Precinct 1 


Precinct 2 


Precinct 3 


Precinct 4 


Precinct 5 


Precinct 6 


Precinct 7 


Precinct 8 


TOTAI 


MODERATOR (2) 




















JAMES D. DOHERTY 


274 


213 


237 


238 


173 


189 


202 


220 


1746 


JOHN DOYLE 


63 


65 


66 


52 


75 


59 


54 


62 


496 


All Others 


1 





2 





6 


1 





2 


12 


Blanks 


40 


27 


18 


18 


18 


23 


13 


13 


170 


SELECTMAN (3) 




















WILLIAM T. DOWNS 


144 


130 


117 


130 


105 


106 


92 


98 


922 


THOMAS P. COLLINS 


19 


40 


41 


19 


53 


33 


43 


24 


272 


MARY N. FRENCH 


210 


129 


159 


155 


112 


128 


133 


173 


1199 


All Others 





























Blanks 


5 


6 


6 


4 


2 


5 


1 


2 


31 


SCHOOL COMMITTEE (1) 




















ERIC J. NADWORNY 


280 


236 


248 


219 


200 


208 


208 


221 


1820 


All Others 


4 


3 


2 


7 


5 


4 


3 


6 


34 


Blanks 


94 


66 


73 


82 


67 


60 


58 


70 


570 


ANDOVER HSG. AUTHORITY (1) 




















JAMES A. CUTICCHIA 


277 


241 


254 


229 


198 


211 


205 


222 


1837 


All Others 


2 


2 





3 


2 





2 


5 


16 


Blanks 


99 


62 


69 


76 


72 


61 


62 


70 


571 



TOTAL: 



2424 



-117- 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 



APRIL 26, 27 & MAY 10, 11, 1999 



WARRANT 
ART. NO. 



DESCRIPTION 



ACTION 
TAKKN 



ATT.GKN. 
APPROVAL 



1 


Town Election 


Approved 


2 


Elccl other Officers 


Approved 


3 


Salaries of elected officials 


Approved 


4 


The Budget 


Approved 


5 


Town Budget transfers 


Withdrawn 


6 


Supplemental budget appropriations 


Approved 


7 


Grant Program Authorizations 


Approved 


8 


Road Contracts 


Approved 


9 


Free Cash 


Approved 


10 


Unexpended Appropriations 


Approved 


11 


Chapter 90 Road Easements 

Eminent Domain 


Approved 


12 


Unpaid Bills 


Approved 


13 


Town Report 


Approved 


14 


Property Tax Exemptions 

Statute Acceptance 


Approved 


15 


Rescind Bond Authorization 


Withdrawn 


16 


Public Safety Center - $12,900,000 

Bonding -Without contingent appropriation 


Approved 


17 


Public Safety Center 

Bonding -Willi contingent appropriation 


Withdrawn 


18 


Senior Center Lease Agreement 

Special Legislation 


Approved 


19 


New Middle & Elementary School 

Bonding -$2,517,000 


Approved 


20 


Sewer Engineering & Design - Forest Hills Area 
Bonding - $250,000 


Approved 


21 


Community Development & Planning Revolving Account 
Statute Acceptance 


Approved 


22 


Health Department Title V Revolving Account 
Statue Acceptance 


Approved 


23 


Health Department Clinic Supplies Revolving Account 
Statute Acceptance 


Approved 


24 


DCS Revolving Account 

Statute Acceptance 


Approved 


25 


I 
Youlh Services Revolving Account 

Statute Acceptance 


Approved 


26 


Plant & Facilities Field Maintenance Revolving Account 


Approved 




Statute Acceptance 


-118- 



27 Elder Services Account Revolving Account 
Statute Acceptance 



Approved 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 26, 27 & MAY 10, 11. 1999 



WARRANT 

ART. NO. DESCRIPTION 

28 Contracts in excess or Three Years 

Statute Acceptance 

29 Accepting Easements 

30 Granting Easements 

31 Tax Voucher Program - $50,000 

32 Elderly & Disabled Transportation Program 

425,000 

33 Special Municipal Celebration Fund 

Statute Acceptance - $20,000 

34 Shawshcen Field Improvements 

35 Buxton Court Acquisition 

36 Fireworks 

37 Outside Police Details 

38 Conservation Commission Land Transfer 

General Bylaw 

39 Transcripts of Selectmen's Meetings 

40 Transcripts of Finance Committee Meetings 

4 1 Sewer Construction - South Main Street/ Ballardvalc 

Bonding • S22.S00.O00 

42 Sewer Construction - Rogers Brook 

Bonding • $4,3000,000 

43 Sanitary Sewer - Beacon Street 

Bonding - $225,000 



44 Landfill Closure 



Bonding - $2,200,000 



45 Town/School Building Improvements 

Bonding -$1,000,000 

46 Town/School Projects - $2,000,000 

47 Public Safety Antennas - $50,000 

48 Accumulated Employee Benefit Account - $300,000 

49 Rczoning for SKC to ID 

Zoning Bylaw 

50 Special Permit Granting Authority 

Zoning Bylaw 

5 1 Insertion of Private Warrant Articles 

General Bylaw 



52 Abolish Fees 



General Bylaw 



ACTION 
TAKKN 

Approved 



Approved 
Approved 
Approved 
Approved 

Approved 



ATT.CKN. 
APPROVAL 



Disapproved 






Disapproved 






Approved 






Approved 






Approved 






Approved 


September 10, 


1909 


Disapproved 


September 10, 


1999 


Approved 






Approved 






Approved 






Approved 






Approved 






Approved 






Approved 






Approved 






Withdrawn 







53 Official Copy of the Warrant 

General Bylaw 



Approved 
Disapproved 
Disapproved 
Disapproved 

-119- 



S opt ember 10, 1999 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 26. 27 & MAY 10, 11. 1999 



WARRANT 

ART. NO. DESCRIPTION 

54 Amend Sidc/froni Yard Setbacks 
Zoning Bylaw 

S3 Open Space Residential Development 
Zoning Bylaw 

56 Storage of Secondhand Junk or Scrap 

Zoning Bylaw 

57 Definition of A Way 

' Zoning Bylaw 



ACTION 
TAKKN 

Approved 



ATT.GKN. 
APPROVAL 

September 10, 1999 



58 Use Regulations 



Zoning Bylaw 



59 Definition of a Driveway 

Zoning Bylaw 

60 Prohibition of Common Driveways 

Zoning Bylaw 

6 1 Miscellaneous Main Uses 

Zoning Bylaw 

62 Light Poles on Recreational Fields 

Zoning Bylaw 

63 Light Pole Design Standards 

Zoning Bylaw 

64 Downtown General Business District 

Zoning Bylaw 

65 Noel Road - Street Acceptance 

66 Acom Drive - Street Acceptance 

67 Basswood Lane • Street Acceptance 

68 Buttonwood Drive - Street Acceptance 

69 Hazelwood Drive - Street Acceptance 

70 Meadow View Lane - Street Acceptance 

7 1 Radcliffc Drive • Street Acceptance 

72 Yardley Road - Street Acceptance 

73 Pay/Bag Refuse Collection Survey 

74 Main Street Strectscape Improvements 

Bonding - S304.000 

75 Wetlands Protection Bylaws 

General Bylaw 

76 Conservation Commission Consultant Fees 

Special Legislation 

77 Numbering of Warrant Articles 

General Bylaw 

78 Remove Cell Tower Andover/Lawrence Line 

79 Land Grant - Stevens Street 



Disapproved 






Approved 


September 10, 


199' 


Approved 


September 10, 


1999 



Approved 



Approved 



September 10, 1999 



September 10, 1999 



Disapproved 




Withdrawn 




Withdrawn 




Withdrawn 




Withdrawn 




Not Laid Out 




Not Laid Out 




Not Laid Out 




Not Laid Out 




Not Laid Out 




Not Laid Out 




Approved 




Approved 




Disapproved 




Approved 




Approved 
Approved 


September 10, 1999 

(part of S. 3 deJ—ted 
Exceptions" H 
2 - see minute: 


Disapproved 




Withdrawn 




-120- 




Withdrawn 





ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 26. 27 & MAY 10, 11. 1999 



WARRANT 
ART. NO- 



DESCRIPTION 



80 Sidewalk Restoration Program 

liniment Domain • 5400,000 

8 1 Sidewalk Five Year Plan 

General Bylaw 

82 Sidewalk Reconstruction 

Bonding - $400,000 

83 Sidewalk - Portion of Salem Street 

Eminent Domain/Bonding - SI 50,000 

84 Shawsheen Historic District 

General Bylaw 

85 Retirement System Non Contributory Retirees COLA 

Statute Acceptance 

86 Retirement System • Option C Pop Up 

Statute Acceptance 

87 Alderbrook (Portion) 

Street Acceptance 

88 Improvements Essex & Pearson Intersection - $30,000 

89 Oppose Gas Power Plant - $50,000 

90 Conveyance of Land - Dwight/Salem Streets 

9 1 Abandon Portion of Public Way - Dwight Street 

92 Abandon Portion of Public Way - School Street 

93 Amend lot/slope Requirements 

Zoning Bylaw 

94 Easement Change - Powers Rd/Cartcr Ln 

Special Legislation 

95 Easement - Andovcr Street 

96 Amend Traffic Rules & Regulations 

97 Expand Layout of Portions of Lowell Street 

98 Ballardvale Historic District Signs - $4,000 



ACTION 


ATT.CKN. 


TAKKN 


APPROVAL 


Approved 




Approved 


September 


Disapproved 




Approved 




Disapproved 




Approved 




Approved 




Approved 




Approved 




Approved 




Withdrawn 




Withdrawn 




Withdrawn 




Withdrawn 





Approved 

Withdrawn 
Withdrawn 
Approved 
Approved 



■121- 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 26. 27. MAY 10. 1 1 

Agreeably to a Warrant signed by the Selectmen on March 1, 1999 the Inhabitants of said Town who 
are qualified to vote in Elections and Town Affairs to meet and assemble at the designated polling 
place. All eight precincts: Precincts One, Two, Three, Four, Five, Six, Seven, Eight, are to vote at the 
Field House, Andover High School, Shawsheen Road, in said Andover, on 

TUESDAY, THE TWENTY-THIRD DAY OF MARCH, 1999 

at seven o'clock A.M. to eight o'clock P.M. to act upon the following articles: 

Pursuant to the foregoing Warrant, I subscriber, one of the Constables of the Town of Andover, have 
notified the Inhabitants of said Town to meet at the time and place and for the purposes stated in said 
Warrant, by posting a true and attested copy of the same on the Town Hall, on each school house and 
in no less than five other public places where bill and notices are usually posted and by publication in 
the Andover Townsman. Said Warrants have been posted and published fourteen days. 

Ronald F. Ford 

Constable 

ARTICLE 1. Took up Article One and proceeded to vote Town Offices. The ballot boxes were 
found to be empty and registered 0000. The polls were opened at seven o'clock A.M. and closed at 
eight o'clock P.M. 

After the final action on the preceding Article One, the said meeting shall stand adjourned by virtue 
of Chapter 39, Section 20 of the Massachusetts General Laws, to April 26, 1999, at 7:00 P.M., at the 
Field House, Andover High School, Shawsheen Road, in said Andover. 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING APRIL 26. 1999 

The check lists were used at the entrance and showed 1711 voters admitted to the meeting. 

The meeting was called to order by James D. Doherty, Moderator at 7:02 P.M. 

The opening prayer was offered by The Reverend, Mark R.P. Welch, Jr., West Parish Church, 
Andover, MA. 

Salute to the flag was led by John P. Hess, Chairman, Board of Selectmen. 

The song, America, written by Samuel Francis Smith in 183 1 while attending Andover Theological 
Seminary, was sung by Mary Ann Iuliucci, a student at Andover High School. 

Upon unanimous consent it was VOTED to admit seven (30) non-voters to the meeting and allow 
non-voters to be escorted to the non-voting section thereafter. 

A presentation of a proclamation was made by Selectman John Hess to William T. Downs for his 
twelve years of service to the Town as a Selectmen. 

Don Schroeder, Chairman of the Finance Committee presented plaques of appreciation to the 
following residents for their service to the Town on the Finance Committee: Frederick Fitzgerald, 
William Novelline, Peter Volpe, Anthony Sakowich, and Gerald Mulligan 

The Moderator announced there would be no smoking or food in the Gymnasium. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED by unanimous consent to dispense with the 
reading of the Warrant and return of service of the Constable. Upon motion made and duly seconded, 
it was VOTED by unanimous consent that the Moderator refer to the warrant articles by number and 
subject matter. 

The voting sections of the hall were laid out by the Moderator for the counters and voters. 

-122- 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING -APRIL 26. 27. MAY 10, 11 

ARTICLE 1. To elect a Moderator for one year, one Selectmen for three years, one member of the 
School Committee for three years and one member of the Andover Housing Authority for five years 

All the candidates above were voted for on one ballot on March 23, 1999: 

The polls were open from 7:00 A.M. to 8:00 P.M. 

Town Clerk, Randall L. Hanson, declared the successful candidates to be as follows: 

John D. Doherty Moderator for One Year 

Mary N. French Selectman for Three Years 

Eric C. Nadworny School Committee for Three Years 

James A. Cuticchia Andover Housing Authority for Five Years 

ARTICLE 2. To elect all other officers not required by law to be elected by ballot. 

On request of the Town Clerk 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that Edward Cole, 43 River Street, be elected 
Trustee of the Cornell Fund for three years by a Majority vote. 

ARTICLE 3. To establish the salaries of the elected officers for the ensuing year. 

On request of the Town Clerk 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED by a Majority vote that the salaries of the 
elected Town Officers be established as follows: 

Town Moderator - $250.00 for each Annual Town Meeting and $60.00 for each 
Special Town Meeting except when it falls within the Annual 
Town Meeting. 

Selectmen - Chairman - $ 1 ,800.00 

Members- $1,500.00 
School Committee - Chairman- $1,800.00 

Members- $1,500.00 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will vote to determine what sums of money the Town will raise 
and appropriate, including appropriations from available funds, to defray charges and expenses of the 
Town, including debt and interest, and to provide for a reserve fund for the Fiscal Year beginning 
July 1, 1999 and ending June 30, 2000 or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager as recommended by the Finance Director 



-123- 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 26. 27, MAY 10, 1 1 
ARTICLE 4 - 1999 ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
GENERAL GOVERNMENT 



BUDGET 



1 PERSONAL SERVICES 1,422,292 

2 OTHER EXPENSES 948,153 

Total 2,370,445 

The motion was APPROVED by Majority vote. 

COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT 

3 PERSONAL SERVICES Including $13,000 in receipts from wetland 935,055 

4 OTHER EXPENSES 153,846 

Total 1,088,901 

The motion was APPROVED by Majority vote. 

COMMUNITY SERVICES 

5 PERSONAL SERVICES Including SI 82,600 in receipts from programs 

and activities 

365,998 

6 OTHER EXPENSES Including $273,400 in receipts from programs 322,535 

Total 688,533 

The motion was APPROVED by Majority vote. 
ELDER SERVICES 

7 PERSONAL SERVICES Including $36,400 in federal receipts, $40,097 388,025 

8 OTHER EXPENSES 166,460 

Total 554,485 

The motion was APPROVED by Majority vote. 
PLANT AND FACILITIES 

9 PERSONAL SERVICES Including $70,000 in rental receipts, $40,000 

from sale of cemetery lots and $70,000 from 

cemetery perpetual care interest income 2,24 9,94 

10 OTHER EXPENSES 2,642,850 

Total 4,892,790 

The motion was APPROVED by Majority vote. 
PUBLIC SAFETY 

1 1 PERSONAL SERVICES Including $10,000 from State DARE grant, 

$49,578 from parking meter revenue and 

$420, 000 in ambulance service collections 8,600,470 

12 OTHER EXPENSES Including $7,280 from parking meter revenue 608,078 

^Total 9,208,548 

The motion was APPROVED by Majority vote. 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING -APRIL 26. 27. MAY 10, 11 
PUBLIC WORKS 

13 PERSONAL SERVICES 1,185,921 

14 OTHER EXPENSES 3,796,125 

Total 4,982,046 

The motion was APPROVED by Majority vote. 
SEWER 

15 PERSONAL SERVICES 196,510 

16 OTHER EXPENSES Including $150,000 from Saver capital 288,100 

17 GREATER LAWRENCE SANITARY 1,220,000 

Upon motion duly made and seconded an amendment was moved to 

decrease line item 16 by 5150,000. 

The amendment was defeated by a Majority vote. 

The original motion was approved by a Majority vote. 

Total 1,704,610 

The motion was APPROVED by Majority vote. 

WATER 

1 8 PERSONAL SERVICES 1 ,228, 1 48 

19 OTHER EXPENSES Including $250,000 from Water capital 1,801,900 

Total 3,030,048 

The motion was APPROVED by Majority vote. 
LIBRARY 

20 PERSONAL SERVICES 1,405,919 

21 OTHER EXPENSES Including $44,702 from state public library 608,850 

Total 2,014,769 

The motion was APPROVED by Majority vote. 
UNCLASSIFIED 

22 COMPENSATION FUND 900,000 

23 RESERVE FUND 200,000 

Total 1,100,000 

The motion was APPROVED by Majority vote. 

ANDOVER SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 

24 PERSONAL SERVICES 29,595,939 

25 OTHER EXPENSES Including $40, 000 in insurance collections for 

school services 6,76 1 ,823 

Total 36,357,762 

The motion was APPROVED by Majority vote. 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 26, 27, MAY 10, I 



26 



GREATER LAWRENCE VOCATIONAL TECHNICAL SCHOOL 

GR LAW ASSESSMENT 



Total 



The motion was APPROVED by Majority vote. 

FIXED 

27 INTEREST EXPENSE 

28 BOND REDEMPTION 

29 STABILIZATION FUND 

30 INSURANCE EXPENSE 

31 RETIREMENT FUND 

32 HEALTH INSURANCE FUND 



The motion was APPROVED by Majority vote. 

TOTAL BUDGET APPROPRIATION 

Finance Committee Report: 
Selectmen Report: 
School Committee Report: 



Total 



Approval 
Approval 
Approval 



SPECIAL ARTICLES - FREE CASH 

Article 9 Free Cash FY 99 

TOTAL 

SPECIAL ARTICLES - TRANSFER OF FUNDS 

Transfer from: 
Article 10 Article 22, 1997 Annual Town Meeting 

and be appropriated to the following: 

FY 2000 Senior Center Tax Voucher Program 



120,791 
120,791 



3,783,972 
6,968,848 
750,000 
525,000 
3,592,193 
3,425,000 

19,045,013 



87,158,741 



1,204,000 
$1,204,000 



5,000 
5,000 



NONE 



SPECIAL ARTICLES - BORROWING 



Article 16 Public Safety Center 

Article 19 New Middle and Elementary School Design 

Article 20 Sewer Design/Engineering - Forest Hills 

Article 41 Sewer Construction - South Main Street 

Article 42 Sewer Construction - Rogers Brook 

Article 43 Sewer Construction - Beacon Street 

Article 44 Landfill Closure 

Article 45 Town/School Building Improvements 

Article 74 Main Street Streetscape 

Article 83 Sidewalk Construction - Salem Street 



UNEXPENDED APPROPRIATIONS 



TOTAL 

126- 



12,900,000 
2,517,000 

250,000 

22,500,000 

4,300,000 

225,000 
2,200,000 
1,000,000 

304,000 

150,000 

$46,346,000 



NONE 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 26. 27. MAY 10, 11 
SPECIAL ARTICLES FROM AVAILABLE FUNDS 

Article 6 School Department - Other Services 424,225 

Article 12 Unpaid Bills 1,283 42 

Article 31 Tax Voucher Program 50,000 

Article 33 Special Municipal Celebration Fund 20,000 

Article 36 Fireworks 7,500 

Article 37 Outside Police Details 10,000 
Article 46 Town School Projects 

Motion 1. Geographic Information System (GIS) 252,000 

Motion 2. Bridge repair and traffic signals 1 15,000 

Motion 3. Town Capital Projects 590,000 

Motion 4. School Capital Projects 713,000 

Motion 5. Public Safety vehicles and equipment 3 10,000 

Motion 6. Skate Park 20,000 

Article 47 Public Safety Antennas 50,000 

Article 48 Accumulation Employee Benefit Account+B77 300,000 

Article 88 Essex & Pearson Street Improvements 30,000 

Article 89 Gas Power Plant Litigation 50,000 

Article 98 Ballardvale Historic District Signs 4,000 

TOTAL $2,947,008.42 

SPECIAL ARTICLES - CHAPTER 44 SEC. 53 Vi REVOLVING ACCOUNTS 



Article 21 Community Development and Planning 

Article 22 Health Department - Title V 

Article 23 Health Department - Clinic Supplies 

Article 24 Department of Community Services 

Article 25 Youth Services 

Article 26 Plant and Facilities Field Maintenance 

Article 27 Elder Services 

TOTAL 

SPECIAL ARTICLES FROM TAXATION 

Article 32 Elderly and Disabled Transportation Program 

Article 39 Selectmen Meeting Transcripts 

Article 40 Finance Committee Transcripts 

Article 80 Sidewalk Restoration 



25,000 

20,000 

5,000 

200,000 
50,000 
30,000 

100,000 

$430,000 



25,000 

4,000 

4,000 

400.000 



TOTAL 
SPECIAL ARTICLES FROM STABILIZATION FUND 
NONE 



$433,000 



A true record 
ATTEST 

Randall L. Hanson 
Town Clerk 

Finance Committee Report: 
_f g^d of Selectmen Report: 

School Committee Report: 



Approval 
Approval 
Approval 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 26. 27. MAY 10. 11 

ARTICLE 5. To see if the Town will vote to transfer from amounts previously appropriated at the 
April 27, 1998 Annual Town Meeting as authorized by Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 44, 
Section 33B or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager as recommended by the Finance Director 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to Withdraw Article 5 by a Majority vote. 

ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to transfer from available funds a sum of money to 
supplement appropriations voted at the April 27, 1998 Annual Town Meeting or take any other 
action related thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager as recommended by the Finance Director 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED by a Majority vote that the sum of $424,225 
be transferred from available funds and be appropriated to School Department - Other Services. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
School Committee Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen and/or the Town 
Manager to apply for, accept and enter into contracts from time to time for the expenditure of any 
funds allotted to Andover by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts or the U. S. Government under 
any State or Federal grant program. 

On request of the Town Manager 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 7 as printed in the Warrant 
by a Majority vote. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 8. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Town Manager to enter into a contract 
with the Massachusetts Highway Department Commissioners or the County Commissioners or the 
Federal Government for the construction and maintenance of public highways in the Town of 
Andover for the ensuing year. 

On request of the Town Manager 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 8 as printed in the Warrant 
by a Majority vote. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 9. To see what amount the Town will vote to permit the Assessors to use in free cash to 
reduce the Fiscal Year 2000 tax rate and to effect appropriations voted at the 1999 Annual Town 
Meeting 

On request of the Town Manager as recommended by the Finance Director 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 9 as printed in the Warrant 
in the amount of $1,204,000 by a Majority vote. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

-128- 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 26. 27. MAY 10, 1 1 

ARTICLE 10. To see what disposition shall be made of unexpended appropriations and free cash 
in the treasury. 

On request of the Town Manager as recommended by the Finance Director 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the Town transfer $5,000 from Article 
22, 1997 Annual Town Meeting and appropriate $5,000 for the FY2000 Senior Citizen Tax 
Voucher Program by a Majority vote 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 11. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Town to acquire any necessary 
easements by gift, by purchase or by right of eminent domain for Chapter 90 Highway Construction 
or any other federal or state aid program for road or sidewalk improvements. 

On request of the Town Manager 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 1 1 was approved as printed in the Warrant. 

VOTE: UNANIMOUS A 2/3 Vote Required 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 12. To see if the Town will vote to transfer from available funds a sum of money to pay 
unpaid bills for which obligation was incurred in prior Fiscal Years. 

On request of the Town Manager as recommended by the Town Accountant 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the Town transfer from available funds 
the sum if $1,283.42 to pay the following unpaid bills: 

Sir Speedy Printing Community Services $ 525.00 

O'Brien Chiropractic Clinic Fire Department 115.20 

O'Brien Chiropractic Clinic Fire Department 57.60 

Northeast Rehabilitation Hospital Fire Department 200.00 

Merrimack Valley Health Services Fire Department 385.62 

Total 1,283.42 

VOTE: UNANIMOUS A 4/5 Vote Required 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 13. To act upon the report of the Town officers. 

On request of the Town Manager 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 13 was approved as printed in the Warrant by a 
Majority vote. 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 14. To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of Section 4, Chapter 73 of the 
Acts of 1986 as amended by Chapter 126 of the Acts of 1988 to allow an additional property tax 
exemption for Fiscal Year 2000 for those persons who qualify for property tax exemptions under 
Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 59, Section 5 or take ajiyjOfuer action related thereto. 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 26. 27, MAY 10, 1 1 



On request of the Town Manager as recommended by the Board of Assessors 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 14 was approved as printed in the Warrant by a 
Majority vote. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 15. To see if the Town will vote to rescind unissued bond authorizations from prior 
Town Meetings or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager as recommended by the Finance Director 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to Withdraw Article 15 by a Majority. 

ARTICLE 16. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum not to exceed $14,000,000 for the 
purpose of constructing a Public Safety Center on the existing site at 32 North Main Street and 
adjacent Town-owned parcels, constructing additions and renovations at the West Andover Fire 
Sub-Station, constructing additions and renovations to the DPW and Plant and Facilities Buildings 
at the Town Yard off Lewis Street, constructing a new building on the site of the existing Parks and 
Grounds Building at the Town Yard off Buxton Court, including plans, demolition, site 
development, parking, original equipment and furnishings and other costs incidental and related 
thereto; to authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire necessary easements by gift, by purchase, by 
eminent domain or otherwise; and that to meet this appropriation, the Treasurer, with the approval 
of the Board of Selectmen, be authorized to borrow said sum under and pursuant to Chapter 44, 
Section 7, Clause (3) of the Massachusetts General Laws, or any other enabling authority, and to 
issue bonds or notes of the Town thereof or take any other action related thereto. (Without 
contingent appropriation) 

On request of the Town Manager as recommended by the Chief of Police and Fire Chief 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 16 as printed in the 
Warrant in the amount of $12,900,000 from borrowing. 

VOTE: UNANIMOUS A 2/3 Vote Required 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 17. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum not to exceed $14,000,000 for the 
purpose of constructing a Public Safety Center on the existing site at 32 North Main Street and 
adjacent Town-owned parcels, constructing additions and renovations at the West Andover Fire 
Sub-Station, constructing additions and renovations to the DPW and Plant and Facilities Buildings 
at the Town Yard off Lewis Street, constructing a new building on the site of the existing Parks and 
Grounds Building at the Town Yard off Buxton Court, including plans, demolition, site 
development, parking, original equipment and furnishings and other costs incidental and related 
thereto; to authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire necessary easements by gift, by purchase, by 
eminent domain or otherwise; and that to meet this appropriation, the Treasurer, with the approval 
of the Board of Selectmen, be authorized to borrow said sum under and pursuant to Chapter 44, 
Section 7, Clause (3) of the Massachusetts General Laws, or any other enabling authority, and to 
issue bonds or notes of the Town thereof, provided that any authorized borrowing hereunder shall 
be contingent on passage of a vote at a Town Election to exempt the amounts required to pay any 
authorized bonds or notes from the provisions of Proposition 2 Vi in accordance with Massachusetts 
General Laws, Chapter 59, Section 21C(m), or take any other action related thereto. (With 
contingent appropriation) 

On request of the Town Manager as recommended by_tkq6hief of Police and Fire Chief 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to Withdraw Article 17 by a Majority vote. 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 26. 27. MAY 10, 11 

ARTICLE 18. To see if the Town will vote to approve and authorize the Board of Selectmen on 
behalf of the Town to enter into and execute a lease with Phillips Academy of the building known 
as William Hall, located at 53 Phillips Street, Andover for use as a senior center, together with such 
land as is necessary for (i) any addition to the building, (ii) necessary parking for the completed 
facility and (iii) surrounding landscaping and outdoor areas, such lease to be for an initial term of 30 
years with one 10-year extension option, with rent to be paid to Phillips Academy during the initial 
30-year term of a nominal $1 .00 per year and the Town to be responsible under the lease for all 
maintenance, utility and insurance costs plus all costs of renovating and adding to the building and 
constructing on site parking, to authorize the Board of Selectmen to petition the General Court for 
the passage of any special legislation to accomplish the foregoing and to take any other action 
related thereto. 

On petition of Dorothy L. Bresnahan and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 18 was moved as printed in the Warrant. 

An amendment was moved and seconded that the Town vote to approve and authorize the Board of 
Selectmen on behalf of the Town to enter into and execute a lease with Phillips Academy of the 
building known as William Hall, located at 53 Phillips Street, Andover for use as a senior center, 
together with such land as is necessary for (i) any addition to the building, (ii) necessary parking for 
the completed facility and (iii) surrounding landscaping and outdoor areas, such lease to be for an 
initial term of 30 years with one 10-year extension option, with rent to be paid to Phillips Academy 
during the initial 30-year term of a nominal $1 .00 per year, with funds for construction and 
renovation to be raised through donations to the Friends of the Andover Senior Center, Inc. and the 
Town to be responsible under the lease for all maintenance, utility and insurance costs; to authorize 
the Board of Selectmen to petition the General Court for the passage of any special legislation to 
accomplish the foregoing and to take any other action related thereto. 

The amendment was approved by a Majority vote. 

A second amendment was moved and seconded that the Town vote to approve and authorize the 
Board of Selectmen on behalf of the Town to enter into negotiations for the purpose of executing a 
lease with Phillips Academy of the building known as Williams Hall, located at 53 Phillips Street, 
Andover for use as a Senior Center, together with such land as is necessary for { 1 } any addition to 
the building, [2] necessary parking of the completed facility and [3] surrounding landscaping and 
outdoor areas, such lease to be for a minimum initial term of 29 years with seven [7] ten [10]-year 
xtension options, with rent to be paid to Phillips Academy during the complete term of $1 .00 per 
year, with funds to be raised through donations to The Friends of the Andover Senior Center, Inc. 
and the Town to be responsible under the lease for all maintenance, utility and insurance costs; to 
authorize the Board of Selectmen to appoint a negotiating committee of not less that three nor more 
than seven members, one of whom shall be a member of the Board of Selectmen, to report to and to 
make recommendation to the Board of Selectmen; and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to 
petition the General Court for the passage of any special legislation to accomplish the foregoing and 
to take any other action related thereto. 

The vote was conceded as failed by the petitioner. 

A third amendment was moved and seconded that the Selectmen be authorized to sign the lease 
after the Town has accepted the gift from the Friends of the Andover Senior Center, Inc, in an 
amount sufficient to cover all costs associated with renovating and adding to Williams Hall, and 
construction of on site parking and the funds have been deposited in a segregate account under the 
control of the Town Treasurer. 

The third amendment was defeated by a Majority vote 

The original article amended by the first amendment was approved by a Majority vote 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval -131- 

Planning Board Report: Approval 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 26. 27. MAY 10. 1 1 

ARTICLE 19. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate the sum of $2,517,000 for architectural 
and engineering services and related costs for constructing, furnishing and equipping a new 
elementary school and new middle school including outside work and other costs incidental and 
related thereto, for engineering and design services to prepare plans for the construction or 
reconstruction of roads and sidewalks in the area of the proposed schools including costs incidental 
and related, for engineering, design and appraisal services to prepare plans for the construction of a 
sanitary sewer line from the end of the existing trunk sewer to the proposed new school site at Cross 
Street at High Plain Road and that to meet this appropriation, the Treasurer, with the approval of 
the Board of Selectmen, is hereby authorized to borrow said sum under and pursuant to Chapter 44, 
Section 7 (21) and (22) of the Massachusetts General Laws, or any other enabling authority, or to 
issue bonds or notes of the Town thereto or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the School Committee 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved that Article 19 be approved as printed in the 
Warrant in the amount of $2,517,000 from borrowing. 

It was moved and seconded to amend Article 19 by inserting after the words in the last sentence 
"issue bonds or notes of the Town thereto;" the following words: " and to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen to petition the General Court for passage of special legislation, if necessary, to allow an 
easement for sewer installation on Town-owned conservation land;" 

The amendment was approved by a Majority vote. 

Article 19 was approved as amended. 

VOTE: YES: 1060 NO: 117 A 2/3 Vote Required 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

School Committee Report: Approval 

Planning Board Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 20. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate the sum of $250,000 for engineering, 
design and appraisal services, or any other costs incidental or related thereto, to prepare plans for 
the construction of sanitary sewer lines in the following streets: Launching Road (portion from 
River Road to house #15), Mercury Circle, Apollo Circle, Gemini Circle, Forest Hills Drive, Aspen 
Circle, Bittersweet Lane, Wintergreen Circle, Deerbury Circle, Brierwood Circle, Sandalwood 
Lane, Pepperidge Circle, Alpine Drive, Sugarbush Lane, Brady Loop and Monahan Lane; and that 
to meet this appropriation, the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, be 
authorized to borrow said sum under and pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 7 of the Massachusetts 
General Laws, or any other enabling authority, and to issue bonds or notes of the Town thereof, or 
take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager as recommended by the Public Works Director 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved that the Town appropriate the sum of $250,000 
for engineering, design and appraisal services, or any other costs incidental or related thereto, to 
prepare plans for the construction of sanitary sewer lines in the following streets: Launching Road 
(portion from River Road to house #15), Mercury Circle, Apollo Circle, Gemini Circle, Forest Hills 
Drive, Aspen Circle, Bittersweet Lane, Wintergreen Circle, Deerbury Circle, Brierwood Circle, 
Sandalwood Lane, Pepperidge Circle, Alpine Drive, Sugarbush Lane, Brady Loop and Monahan 
Lane; and that to meet this appropriation, the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of 
Selectmen, be authorized to borrow said sum under and pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 7 of the 
Massachusetts General Laws, or any other enabling authority, and to issue bonds or notes of the 
Town thereof, or take any other action related thereto. 

It was moved and seconded to amend Article 20 by deleting the words "(portion from River Road to 
house #15) and to include Cross Street and Mulberry Circle.i -39. 

The amendment was approved by a Majority vote. 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 26. 27. MAY 10, 11 

A second amendment was moved and seconded to insert after "Monahan Lane", ; and, further, that 
the appraisal also evaluate the potential for, or difficulties posed by, further sewer line development 
in the entire region known as West Andover [North of Route 495 and West of Route 93] 

The second amendment was DEFEATED by a Majority vote. 

A motion was made for a secret ballot. The motion was not seconded. 

The original motion as amended was approved. 

VOTE: YES: 548 NO: 77 A 2/3 Vote Required 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 

School Committee Report: Approval 

Planning Board Report: Approval 

Health Department: Approval 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was voted to adjourn at 10:45 P.M., until Tuesday, 
April 27, 1999 at 7:00 P. M. at the Field House, Andover High School, Shawsheen Road. 

ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 27. 1999 

The check lists were used at the entrance and showed 1222 voters were admitted to the meeting. 

The meeting was called to order by James Doherty, Moderator, at 7:00 P.M. 

By unanimous consent it was voted to admit fifteen (15 ) non-voters to the meeting and to escort 
non-voters to the non-voter section thereafter. 

ARTICLE 21. To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of Massachusetts General 
Laws, Chapter 44, Section 53E1/2 for the purpose of establishing a Community Development and 
Planning revolving account for advertising of legal hearings and notice expenses associated with 
permit applications for the Building, Planning, Conservation and Health Divisions of said 
Department for Fiscal Year 2000, such expenses to be funded by fees collected from applicants and 
to authorize the Town Manager to make expenditures in an amount not to exceed $25,000 in Fiscal 
Year 2000 or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager as recommended by the Dept. of Comm. Dev. & Planning 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 2 1 was approved as printed in the Warrant not to 
exceed $25,000 by a Majority vote. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 22. To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of Massachusetts General 
Laws, Chapter 44, Section 53E1/2 for the purpose of establishing a Community Development and 
Planning, Health Division, revolving account for soil testing, field inspection and related State 
Environmental Code, Title V expenses, such expenses to be funded by revenues collected from 
Title V upgrade permit fees for the Fiscal Year 2000 and to authorize the Town Manager to make 
expenditures in an amount not to exceed $20,000 for Fiscal Year 2000 or take any other action 
related thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager as recommended by the Dept. of Comm. Dev. & Planning 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 22 was approved as printed in the Warrant not to 
exceed $20,000 by a Majority vote. 

-133- 
Finance Committee Report: Approval 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 26. 27. MAY 10, 1 1 

ARTICLE 23. To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of Massachusetts General 
Laws, Community Development and Planning, Health Division, revolving Chapter 44, Section 
53E1/2 for the purpose of establishing a account for clinic supplies and related program activities 
expenses, for Fiscal Year 2000, such expenses to be funded by revenues collected from clinic 
participant fees and to authorize the Town Manager to make expenditures in an amount nol to 
exceed $5,000 for Fiscal Year 2000 or take any other action relative thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager as recommended by the Dept. of Comm. Dev. & Planning 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 23 was approved as printed in the Warrant not to 
exceed $5,000 by a Majority vote. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 24. To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of Massachusetts General 
Laws, Chapter 44, Section 53E'/2 for the purpose of establishing a Community Services revolving 
account for ticket sales, related trip expenses, new special events and activities for Fiscal Year 
2000; such expenses to be funded by revenues collected from these activities, and to authorize the 
Town Manager to make expenditures in an amount not to exceed $200,000 for FY-2000 or take any 
other action related thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager as recommended by the Community Services Coordinator 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 24 was approved as printed in the Warrant not to 
exceed $200,000 by a Majority vote. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 25. To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of Massachusetts General 
Laws, Chapter 44, Section 53E'/2 for the purpose of establishing a Youth Services revolving account 
for program activities for Fiscal Year 2000, such expenses to be funded by revenues collected from 
these activities, and to authorize the Town Manager to make expenditures in an amount not to 
exceed $50,000 for FY-2000 or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager as recommended by the Youth Services Coordinator 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 25 was approved as printed in the Warrant not to 
exceed $50,000 by a Majority vote. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 26. To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of Massachusetts General 
Laws, Chapter 44, Section 53E'/2 for the purpose of establishing a Department of Plant and 
Facilities revolving account for field maintenance and related expenses for Fiscal Year 2000, such 
expenses to be funded by revenues collected by field rentals, and to authorize the Town Manager to 
make expenditures in an amount not to exceed $30,000 for FY-2000 or take any other action related 
thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager as recommended by the Plant & Facilities Director 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 26 was approved as printed in the Warrant not to 
exceed $30,000 by a Majority vote. 



Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 



•134- 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 26. 27. MAY 1 0, 1 1 

ARTICLE 27. To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of Massachusetts General 
Laws, Chapter 44, Section 53E!/ 2 for the purpose of establishing an Elder Services revolving 
account for expenses related to Senior activities and programs of said department for Fiscal Year 
2000; such expenses to be funded by fees collected from participants, and to authorize the Town 
Manager to make expenditures in an amount not to exceed $200,000 for Fiscal Year 2000 or take 
any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager as recommended by the Elder Services Director 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 27 was approved as printed in the Warrant not to 
exceed $100,000 by a Majority vote. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 28. To see if the Town will vote in accordance with the provisions of Massachusetts 
General Laws Chapter 3 0B, Section 12(b), to authorize the Town Manager or the Superintendent of 
Schools to solicit and award contracts for terms exceeding three years, including any renewal, 
extension or option, provided in each instance the longer term is determined to be in the best 
interest of the Town by a vote of the Board of Selectmen or the School Committee, as appropriate, 
or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager and the Superintendent of Schools 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 28 was approved as printed in the Warrant by a 
Majority vote. 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
School Committee Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 29. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen and the School 
Committee to accept grants of easements for water drainage, sewage disposal and utility purposes 
on terms and conditions the Board and the Committee deem in the best interests of the Town or take 
any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 29 was approved as printed in the Warrant by a 
Majority vote. 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
School Committee Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 30. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen and the School 
Committee to grant easements for water drainage, sewage disposal and utility purposes on terms 
and conditions the Board and the Committee deem in the best interests of the Town or take any 
other action related thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 30 was approved as printed in the Warrant by a 
Majority vote. 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
School Committee Report: Approval 



ARTICLE 31. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation and/or transfer from available 
funds, the sum of $50,000 for the purpose of providing senion ejtizens and disabled homeowners 
with a real estate tax payment voucher program as formulated by the Council on Aging and 
approved by the Town Manager or take any other action related thereto. 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 26. 27. MAY 10, 1 1 

On request of the Town Manager as recommended by the Elder Services Director 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 31 was approved as printed in the Warrant in the 
amount of $50,000 from available funds by a Majority vote. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 32. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation a sum not to exceed $25,000 and 
appropriate for the purpose of continuing to provide for an elderly and disabled transportation 
subsidy program, or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager as recommended 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 32 was approved as printed in the Warrant in the 
amount of $25,000 from taxation by a Majority vote. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 33. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation or by transfer from available funds 
and appropriate a sum not to exceed $ 20,000 for the Centennial Celebration Fund as authorized by 
Chapter 59 of the Acts of 1998 or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager as recommended 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 33 was approved as printed in the Warrant in the 
amount of $20,000 from available funds by a Majority vote. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 



ARTICLE 34. To see if the Town will vote to amend the vote taken on Article 47 of the 1996 
Annual Town Meeting to read as follows: "Moved that the sum of $189,000 be hereby appropriated 
for the development of improvements at Upper and Lower Shawsheen Fields, including outdoor 
lighting for the Lower Shawsheen Fields on poles not to exceed 65 feet in height; reconstructing the 
track; paving Upper Shawsheen with barrier; water for ice skating; play structures and picnic tables 
and that to raise this appropriation, the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, is 
authorized to borrow $189,000 under and pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 7(25) of the 
Massachusetts General Laws, or any other enabling authority, and to issue bonds or notes of the 
Town therefor" or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Board of Selectmen 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved that the Town vote to amend the vote taken on 
Article 47 of the 1996 Annual Town Meeting to read as follows: "Moved that the sum of $189,000 
be hereby appropriated for the development of improvements at Upper and Lower Shawsheen 
Fields, including outdoor lighting for the Lower Shawsheen Fields on poles not to exceed 65 feet in 
height; reconstructing the track; paving Upper Shawsheen with barrier; water for ice skating; play 
structures and picnic tables and that to raise this appropriation, the Treasurer, with the approval of 
the Board of Selectmen, is authorized to borrow $189,000 under and pursuant to Chapter 44, 
Section 7(25) of the Massachusetts General Laws, or any other enabling authority, and to issue 
bonds or notes of the Town therefor" or take any other action related thereto. 

The question was moved for a vote. The moderator asked for a show of hands of those that favored 
a call of the question. The Moderator declared that the motion approved by a Majority vote. 

-136- 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING -APRIL 26. 27. MAY 10, 11 

Article 34 was DEFEATED 

VOTE: Vote declared less than 2/3 Vote by Moderator A 2/3 Vote Required 

Finance Committee Report: No position 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 35. To sec if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire by gift, 
purchase or taking by eminent domain the property at 11-13 Buxton Court, shown on Assessors 
Map 38, Lot 20, together with the improvements thereon for municipal purposes, and to raise by 
taxation, borrowing or transfer from available funds or any combination of the foregoing and 
appropriate the sum not to exceed $250,000 for said acquisition and demolition or take any other 
action related thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved that the Town vote to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen to acquire by gift, purchase or taking by eminent domain the property at 11-13 Buxton 
Court, shown on Assessors Map 38, Lot 20, together with the improvements thereon for municipal 
purposes, and to appropriate the sum of $250,000 for said acquisition and demolition; and that to 
meet this appropriation, the treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, be authorized to 
borrow said sum under and pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 7, clause 3 of the Massachusetts 
General Laws, or any other enabling authority, and to issue bonds or notes of the town thereof. 

Article 35 was DEFEATED 

VOTE: Vote declared less than 2/3 Vote by Moderator A 2/3 Vote Required 

Finance Committee Report: Disapproval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approved 

ARTICLE 36. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate from available funds the sum of $7,500 
for the 1999 Independence Day fireworks celebration or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 36 was approved as printed in the Warrant in the 
amount of $7,500 from available funds by a Majority vote. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 37. To see if the Town will vote to transfer from available funds a sum not to exceed 
$10,000 to the Police Department's OfT-Duty Detail Revolving Account for the purpose of 
eliminating uncollectible debts resulting from unpaid off-duty details or take any other action 
related thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager as recommended by the Chief of Police 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 37 was approved as printed in the Warrant in the 
amount of $10,000 from available funds by a Majority vote. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 38. To see if the Town will vote to transfer the following tax title properties to the 
control and custody of the Conservation Commission, under the provisions of Massachusetts 
General Laws, Chapter 40, Section 8C: 1 Lincoln Street, consisting of approximately 4.310 acres 
(Map 71, Lot 73); 3 Dufton Road, consisting of approximately 7,380 square feet (Map 19, Lot 118); 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 26. 27. MAY 10, 1 1 

and 46 Tucker Road, consisting of approximately 8 acres (Map 9, Lot 4A), or take any other action 
related thereto 

On request of the Conservation Commission 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 38 was approved as printed in the Warrant. 

VOTE: Declared more than 2/3 vote by Moderator A 2/3 Vote Required 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 

Conservation Board Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 39. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation and appropriate a sum not to 
exceed $4,000 for the first year's operation, and to require that, henceforth, all regular and special 
meetings of the Board of Selectmen of the Town of Andover, including executive sessions, shall be 
recorded officially in their entirety by means of a tape recorder or by other means of sonic 
reproduction, from the resulting recordings of which transcripts shall be made, such recordings and 
transcripts to be preserved in perpetuity, and copies of both the recordings and the transcripts shall 
be made available to the public as soon as possible, at no greater than actual cost. 

On petition of John Doyle and others 

Upon motion made and duly Article 39 was moved as printed in the Warrant not to exceed $4,000 
for the first year's operation by a Majority vote. 

A motion was made and seconded to amend Article 39 by excluding executive sessions. 

The amendment lost by a Majority vote. 

The original motion passed by a Majority vote. 

Finance Committee Report: Disapproval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Disapproval 

ARTICLE 40. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation and appropriate a sum not to 
exceed $4,000 for the first year's operation, and to require that, henceforth, all meetings of the 
Finance Committee of the Town of Andover, including executive sessions, shall be recorded 
officially in their entirety by means of a tape recorder or by other means of sonic reproduction, from 
the resulting recordings of which transcripts shall be made, such recordings and transcripts to be 
preserved in perpetuity, and copies of both the recordings and the transcripts shall be made 
available to the public as soon as possible, at no greater than actual cost. 

On petition of John Doyle and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 40 was approved as printed in the Warrant not to 
exceed $4,000 for the first year's operation by a Majority vote. 

Finance Committee Report: Disapproval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Disapproval 

ARTICLE 41. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate the sum of $22,500,000 for the purpose 
of constructing a sanitary sewerage system and other ancillary facilities for the South Main Street 
and Ballardvale Road Areas as shown on the 1979 Wastewater Facilities Plan and including public 
ways in adjacent areas of Fosters Pond and Woburn Street, and for the payment of all other costs 
incidental and related thereto, and that to meet this appropriation, the Treasurer, with the approval 
of the Board of Selectmen, be authorized to borrow said sum and issue bonds or notes under 
Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 44, Section 7 and/or Chapter 29C; such bonds or notes shall 
be general obligations of the Town, unless the Treasurer, with ^approval of the Selectmen, 
determines that they should be issued as limited obligations ana may be secured by local system 
revenues as defined in Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 29C; that the Treasurer, with the 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 26. 27, MAY 10, 11 

approval of the Selectmen, be authorized to borrow all or a potion of such amount from the 
Massachusetts Water Pollution Abatement Trust (Trust) established pursuant to Massachusetts 
General Laws Chapter 29C and in conjunction therewith to enter into a loan agreement and/or 
security agreement with the Trust and the Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) with 
respect to such loan and for any federal or state aid available for the project or for the financing 
thereto, that the Selectmen be authorized to enter into a project regulatory agreement with the DEP, 
to expend all funds available for the project, to acquire the necessary easements by gift, by 
purchase, by eminent domain or otherwise, and to take any other action related thereto Betterments 
are to be assessed in accordance with applicable law. 

On request of the Town Manager as recommended by the Public Works Director 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 41 was moved as printed in the Warrant in the 
amount of $22,500,000 from borrowing. 

A motion was made and seconded to amend Article 41 by adding the words "Specifically, all 
property owner betterment values will be assessed an equal portion of the total cost burden for the 
sewer project, (everyone pays the same). 

The amendment lost by a Majority vote. 

A motion was made and seconded to move the question. The motion was approved by a 
Majority vote. 

VOTE: Declared more than 2/3 Vote by Moderator 

The original motion was approved. 

VOTE: YES: 826 NO: 163 A 2/3 Vote Required 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

Planning Board Report: Approval 

Conservation Board Report: No position 

ARTICLE 42. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate the sum of $4,300,000 for the purpose 
of constructing a sanitary sewerage systems and other ancillary facilities for the Rogers Brook Area 
as shown on the 1979 Wastewater Facilities Plan, and for the payment of all other costs incidental 
and related thereto, aqd that to meet this appropriation, the Treasurer, with the approval of the 
Board of Selectmen, be authorized to borrow said sum and issue bonds or notes under 
Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 44, Section 7 and/or Chapter 29C, such bonds or notes shall 
be general obligations of the Town, unless the Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen, 
determines that they should be issued as limited obligations and may be secured by local system 
revenues as defined in Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 29C; that the Treasurer, with the 
approval of the Selectmen, be authorized to borrow all or a portion of such amount from the 
Massachusetts Water Pollution Abatement Trust (Trust) established pursuant to Massachusetts 
General Laws Chapter 29C and in conjunction therewith to enter into a loan agreement and/or 
security agreement with the Trust and the Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) with 
respect to such loan and for any federal or state aid available for the project or for the financing 
thereof, that the Selectmen be authorized to enter into a project regulatory agreement with the DEP, 
to expend all funds available for the project, to acquire the necessary easements by gift, by 
purchase, by eminent domain or otherwise, and to take any other action related thereto. Betterments 
are to be assessed in accordance with applicable law. 

On request of the Town Manager as recommended by the Public Works Director 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 42 was approved as printed in the Warrant in the 
amount of $4,300,000 from borrowing. 

-139- 

VOTE: YES: 771 NO: 57 A 2/3 Vote Required 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 26. 27, MAY 10, 11 

Finance Committee Report Approval 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

Planning Board Report: Approval 

Conservation Board Report: No position 

Board of Health Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 43. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by transfer from available funds, 
by borrowing or any combination of the foregoing, and appropriate a sum approximately $225,000 
for the cost of constructing a sanitary sewer in Beacon Street, from the West Elementary School to 
Number 52, 48, 44, 40 and 36 Beacon Street and to authorize the Town to acquire the necessary 
easements by gift, by purchase or by seizure by right of eminent domain Betterments are to be 
assessed. 

On request of the Town Manager as recommended by the Public Works Director 

Upon motion made and seconded it was moved that the Town vote to raise by borrowing and 
appropriate the sum of $225,000 for the cost of constructing a sanitary sewer in Beacon Street, 
from the West Elementary School to Number 52, 48, 44, 40 and 36 Beacon Street and to authorize 
the Town to acquire the necessary easements by gift, by purchase or by seizure by right of eminent 
domain; and that to meet this appropriation, the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of 
Selectmen, be authorized to borrow said sum under and pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 7, clause 1 
of the Massachusetts General Laws, or any other enabling authority, and to issue bonds or notes of 
the town thereof. Betterments are to be assessed in accordance with applicable law. 

VOTE: Declared more than 2/3 Vote by Moderator A 2/3 Vote Required 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Board of Health Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 44. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate the sum of $2,200,000 for the purpose 
of closing out the Town landfill on Ledge Road including making any improvements to the area and 
any other costs incidental and related and that to meet this appropriation, the Treasurer, with the 
approval of the Board of Selectmen, be authorized to borrow said sum under and pursuant to 
Chapter 44, Section 8, clause (24) of the Massachusetts General Laws, or any other enabling 
authority, to issue bonds or notes of the Town thereof and to apply for any state or federal money 
that may be available, or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager as recommended by the Public Works Director 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 44 was approved as printed in the Warrant in the 
amount of $2,200,000 from borrowing. 

VOTE: Declared more than 2/3 Vote by Moderator A 2/3 Vote Required 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

Planning Board Report: Approval 

Board of Health Report: Approval 

Conservation Board Report: Approval 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was voted to adjourn at 10:20 P.M., until Monday, May 
10, 1999 at 7:00 P. M. at the Collins Center, Andover High School, Shawsheen Road. 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - May 10, 1999 

The check lists were used at the entrance and showed 622 voters were admitted to the meeting. 

-140- 
The meeting was called to order by James Doherty, Moderator, at 7:04 P.M. 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 26. 27. MAY 10, 1 1 

By unanimous consent it was voted to admit twenty-three (23 ) non-voters to the meeting and to 
escort non-voters to the non-voter section thereafter. 

ARTICLE 45. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate the sum of $1,000,000 for the purpose 
of remodeling, reconstructing or making extraordinary repairs to public buildings, including the 
payment of all costs incidental and related, and that to meet this appropriation, the Treasurer, with 
the approval of the Board of Selectmen, is hereby authorized to borrow said sum under and pursuant 
to Chapter 44, Section 7, clause (3A) of the Massachusetts General Laws, or any other enabling 
authority, or to issue bonds or notes of the Town thereto or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager as recommended by the Plant & Facilities Director 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 45 was approved as printed in the Warrant in the 
amount of $1,000,000 from borrowing. 

VOTE: Declared more than a 2/3 Vote by Moderator A 2/3 Vote Required 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
School Committee Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 46. To see if the Town will vote to transfer from available funds and appropriate the 
sum of $2,000,000 for the following purposes: (1) Geographic Information System - $252,000; 
(2)Bridge repair and traffic signals - $1 15,000; (3) Town capital projects - $590,000; (4) School 
capital projects - $713,000; (5) Public Safety vehicles and equipment - $3 10,000 and (6) 
Community Skate Park - $20,000 or take any other action related thereto 

On request of the Town Manager 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 46 was approved as printed in the Warrant in the 
amount of $2,00,000 by the following motions: 

Motion 1. I move that the Town appropriate the sum of $252,000 from available funds for the 
Town's Geographic Information System (GIS). 

Approved by a Majority vote in the amount of $252,000 from available funds. 

Motion 2. I move that the Town appropriate the sum of $1 15,000 from available funds for bridge 
repair and traffic signals. 

Approved by a Majority vote in the amount of $115,000 from available funds. 

Motion 3. I move that the Town appropriate the sum of $590,000 from available funds for Town 
Capital Projects. 

Approved by a Majority vote in the amount of $590,000 from available funds.. 

Motion 4. I move that the Town appropriate the sum of $713,000 from available funds for School 
Capital Projects. 

Approved by a Majority vote in the amount of $713,000 from available funds. 

Motion 5. I move that the Town appropriate the sum of $3 10,000 from available funds for Public 
Safety vehicles and equipment. 

Approved by a Majority vote in the amount of $310,000 from available funds. 

Motion 6. I move that the Town appropriate the sum of $20,000 from available funds for the Skate 
Park. -141- 

Approved by a Majority vote in the amount of $20,000 from available funds. 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING -APRIL 26, 27, MAY 10, 11 



Finance Committee Report: Approval 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

School Committee Report: Approval 

Planning Board Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 47. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate the sum of $50,000 from taxation, 
transfer from available funds or any combination of the foregoing to acquire or construct 
communication towers, buildings and related facilities on Holt Hill and Wood Hill and to authorize 
the Town to enter into leases, agreements or licenses with third parties to allow third parties to use 
such towers, buildings and facilities with all of the foregoing on terms and conditions the Board of 
Selectmen deem to be in the best interest of the Town or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager as recommended by the Chief of Police and Fire Chief 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 47 was approved as printed in the Warrant in the 
amount of $50,000 from available funds. 

Finance Committee Report. Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 48. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation and/or by transfer from available 
funds and appropriate a sum not to exceed $400,000 to the Accumulated Employee Benefit Account 
for funding accrued employee vacation and sick leave liabilities payable upon retirement or take 
any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager as recommended by the Town Accountant 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 48 was approved as printed in the Warrant in the 
amount of $300,000 from available funds. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 49. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Andover Zoning By-law in Section III, 
District Boundaries (and make the appropriate changes to the Zoning Map of Andover, MA) to 
rezone to Industrial D District (ID) from Single Residence C (SRC) those certain parcels of land 
situated 500 feet westerly of the westerly sideline of Haggetts Pond Road, being more particularly 
shown as Lot "A" on a plan of land entitled "Plan of Land in Andover, MA prepared for 
Metropolitan Life Insurance Company, Scale 1" = 150' May 21, 1991 prepared by Dana F. Perkins 
and Assoc, Inc." (A copy of which is on file with the Office of the Town Clerk) but excluding so 
much of said Lot "A" as lies within 500 feet westerly of the westerly sideline of Haggetts Pond 
Road; said parcels of land being shown as Lots 1 and 6 on Town of Andover Assessor's Map 219; 
Lot 12, Assessor's Map 220; Lot 2A, Assessor's Map 221; and Lot 2 on Assessor's Map 227, but 
excluding so much of said land as lies within 500 feet westerly of the westerly sideline of Haggetts 
Pond Road 

On petition of Richard G. Asoian and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to Withdraw Article 49 by a Majority vote. 

ARTICLE 50. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-law as follows: 

1 . Section VIII.C.a.(3) of the Zoning By-Law by deleting the words "Removal or Regrading 
incidental to subdivision development, under S. VI, Subsection E, Paragraphs 1.2a, b and c of this 
bylaw;" and replacing therewith the words "Earth Movement, under VI.E.l.la., b. and c. of this 
bylaw;" 

2. Section Vlll.C.a. of the Zoning By-Law by adding the following subsections: 

-142- 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 26. 27. MAY 10, 1 1 

"(7) Planned development - multifamily dwelling or mixed use, under Section VI. 0.3. of this 
bylaw, 

(8) Elderly housing, under Section VI. V., of this bylaw." 

or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager as recommended by the Planning Division 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 50 was approved as printed in the Warrant. 

VOTE: Declared less than a 2/3 vote by Moderator A 2/3 Required 

Motion DEFEATED 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 51. To see if the Town will vote to require the Board of Selectmen to insert in the 
Town Meeting Warrant all privately petitioned subjects received in the Town Clerk's office prior to 
the Selectmen's signing of the Warrant. 

On petition of Margaret R. Cronin and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 5 1 was DEFEATED by a Majority vote. 

Finance Committee Report: Disapproval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Disapproval 

ARTICLE 52. To see if the Town will vote to abolish fees for copies of public documents unless 
the fees have been specifically determined by State statute. 

On petition of Margaret R. Cronin and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 52 was moved as printed in the Warrant. 

Article 52 was DEFEATED by a Majority vote. 

Finance Committee Report: Disapproval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Disapproval 
Planning Board Report: Disapproval 

ARTICLE 53. To see if the Town will vote to require that, henceforth, the Selectmen shall provide 
each voter of the Town of Andover with an official copy of the Warrant for any annual or special 
Town Meeting, to be used for the conduct of the business of such Town Meeting, and stating the 
time and place of holding the meeting and the subjects to be acted upon thereat, in compliance with 
Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 39, Section 10, such document to be devoid of editorial 
comment, recommendations and statements of approval or disapproval of any kind. 

On petition of John Doyle and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 53 was moved as printed in the Warrant. 

Article 53 was DEFEATED by a Majority vote 

Finance Committee Report: Disapproval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Disapproval 

-143- 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 26. 27. MAY 10, 1 1 

ARTICLE 54. To see if the Town will vote to amend Section V.A., Table of Dimensional 
Requirements of the Zoning By-law by increasing the minimum side and front yard setback by five 
feet as follows: 

District Minimum Yard Depth 

Front Side 

(feet) (feet) 

Single Residence A change 30 to 35 change 15 to 20 

The minimum yard depth of 15 feet shall continue to apply to dwelling units which are exempt by 
virtue of the provisions of M.G.L. Chapter 40A, Section 6. This by-law shall not be required for 
work which is performed in connection with the ordinary maintenance or improvement of a single 
family house lawfully in existence or for which a building permit had been issued on or before 
January 1, 1999, including, but not limited to, building additions and conversion of lawn to 
accessory uses such as decks, sheds, patios and pools. 

or take any other action thereto. 

On petition of Abigail L. O'Hara and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 54 was approved as printed in the Warrant. 

VOTE: Declared more than a 2/3 vote by the Moderator A 2/3 Vote Required 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Disapproval 

ARTICLE 55. (1) To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning Bylaw, Article VIII, Section 
VI.D. by deleting the section in its entirety and replacing with the following: 

"VI.D. Open Space Residential Development 

1. Purpose: The purpose of this section is to encourage the preservation of open land for its 
scenic beauty and to enhance open space and recreational use; to protect the natural 
environment; to protect the value of real property; to promote more sensitive siting of 
buildings and better overall site planning; to preserve the natural landscape and 
environment of the Town; to provide critical connections to protected open space areas 
and neighborhoods; to facilitate the construction and maintenance of streets, utilities and 
public services in a more economic and efficient manner; and to promote alternative 
modes of transportation and create a greater sense of community. 

2. Applicability: The Planning Board may grant a special permit for the construction and 
occupancy of an open space residential development on a tract of land in the Single 
Residence B, Single Residence C and Limited Service Districts subject to the provisions 
of this Section of the bylaw. 

3. Design Requirements: 

a. Lot size: No lot within the development shall be less than 2/3 of the required lot size 
for the zoning district in which the development is located. 

b. Density: The total number of lots allowed shall be equivalent to the number of lots 
into which the parcel could be divided under normally applicable zoning and 
subdivision regulations. 

c. Lot frontage: The minimum frontage of any lot shall not be less than one hundred 
(100) feet measured at the street line. Only lots fronting on a subdivision street in an 
open space residential development may have reduced lot area or frontage as allowed 
in this section. -144- 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 26. 27. MAY 10, 1 1 

d. Lot width: No lot may be less than one hundred (100) feet in width between side lot 
lines as measured along lines which are at ninety (90) degree angles to the side lot 
lines. 

e. Open space: A minimum of 30% of the land area within the open space residential 
development shall be common open space as defined in subsection VI. D. 5 below. 

f. Yard depth: In consideration of a special permit for an open space residential 
development under Section VI. D of this bylaw, the Planning Board may approve a 
reduction in the minimum side yard depth to 20 feet. 

g. Documentation: All lots to be developed under the provisions of this section shall be 
shown on a recorded plan stating that this section applies. A notation shall be placed 
on the plan indicating that no additional building lots are to be created through future 
land division of such developed lots. 

4. Application requirements. 

a. At the time of submission of a preliminary or definitive open space residential 
subdivision plan the applicant shall submit a sketch plan of a conventional 
subdivision layout (non-open space residential development) at a scale of one inch 
equals 40 feet or one inch equals 100 feet. The sketch plan shall at a minimum 
contain the information required for a preliminary subdivision plan. 

b. The plans shall be accompanied by a written statement of the reason or reasons why 
the Board should give favorable attention to an application for an open space 
residential development. 

5. Open space: 

a. All land not designated for roads, lots for dwellings or other development within the 
development shall be held for common open space. Common open space shall be 
preserved for recreation or conservation use and shall comprise not less than 30% of 
the land within the open space residential development. Such open land shall cither 
be conveyed to the Town of Andover and accepted by it for recreation or open space 
use or be conveyed to a nonprofit organization, the principal purpose of which is the 
conservation of open space, or be conveyed to a corporation or trust owned or to be 
owned by the owners of lots or residential units within the plan, articles of 
corporation or trust to be legally drawn up and available for review by Planning 
Board prior to final approval of the plan. If such a corporation or trust is utilized, 
ownership thereof shall pass with conveyances of the lots or residential units. In any 
case where such land is not conveyed to the town, a restriction enforceable by the 
Town of Andover shall be recorded providing that such land shall be kept in an open 
or natural state and not be built upon or developed for accessory uses such as parking 
or roadway. All such open space shall be restricted by deed from all future building. 

b. The Board may require the provision or reservation of pedestrian/bicycle access ways 
of suitable width and in locations suitable for pedestrian/bicycle movement of 
different types connecting open space areas within the open space residential 
development or to other adjacent open spaces and neighborhoods. 

c. Before final approval of the special permit by the Planning Board, the developer shall 
state which of the three conveyance options in subsection a above is being proposed, 
and such disposition, if approved by the Board, shall be recorded as a restriction on 
the development plan. 

d. Prior to issuance of a Clearance Certificate for the development of any lot shown on 
an open space residential development plan the required open space area shall be 
conveyed to the approved recipient, however, jrjor to such conveyance all taxes for 
the open space area shall have been paid througn tne full tax-year of such conveyance, 
and all property bounds for the open space area shall have been installed 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 26. 27. MAY 10. 1 1 

e Areas deemed by the Board to be inappropriate for the uses of recreation, protection 
of significant natural features or buffering due to size, shape or location, may not be 
included in the minimum required open space area. 

6. Decision: The Planning Board may approve a special permit for an open space 
residential development in accordance with the provisions of Section VIII. C. of the 
Zoning By-Law, and upon a finding that such open space residential development fulfills 
the objectives set forth in subsection 1 above. In its consideration of a special permit for 
an open space residential development plan the Board shall give particular attention lo, 
and may use as a basis for its decision, the following criteria: 

a. The arrangement of lots, streets and buildings as they may promote the 
harmonious integration of the proposed development with existing surrounding 
properties; 

b. Originality in the overall layout and design to achieve the best possible 
relationship between the proposed development and the land; 

c Usability of open spaces for active or passive recreation, determined by size, 
shape, topography, location, and proximity to nearby recreation or conservation 
areas; 

d. Inclusion within open spaces of irreplaceable natural features such as streams, 
mature trees or clusters of trees, rock outcrops, eskers, bluffs, slopes and historic 
or archaeological features; 

e. Accessibility of open spaces to the handicapped, elderly and children; 

f. Suitability of open spaces for scenic values and improvement or preservation of 
views." 

(2) Amend Section V., first paragraph by replacing the words "Cluster development" with the 
words "Open space residential development". 

(3) Amend Section V.A. by deleting the last sentence after **** and replacing with the following: 

"The minimum yard depth requirement for an open space residential development under Section 
VI.DJ.e of this bylaw may be reduced by the Planning Board to 20 feet." 

(4) Amend Section IV.B. 1 A. by substituting the words "Cluster development" with the words 
"Open space residential development". 

(5) Amend the Zoning Bylaw, Article VIII, Section VIII.C.2.a.(2) by replacing the words "Cluster 
development" with the words "Open space residential development", 

or take any action related hereto. 

On request of the Town Manager at the recommendation of the Planning Division 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 55 was moved as printed in the Warrant. 

A motion was made and seconded to amend Article 55 by changing item #3 of the article and 
replacing "section VI.D.3.e" with the words "Section VI.D.3. f . 

The amendment was approved by a Majority vote. 

VOTE: Declared DEFEATED by more than a 2/3 vote by Moderator A 2/3 vote required 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval \A£> 

Planning Board Report: Approval 

Conservation Board Report: Approval 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 26, 27. MAY 10, 11 
ARTICLE 56. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-law as follows: 
Amend Article VIII, Table of Use Regulations, § IV, Subsection B by adding the following: 





Residence 


Business 


Industrial 


SRA 


SRB 


SRC 


APT 


LS 


OP 


GB 


MU 


IG 


IA 


ID 




54. Storage in the open of 
sccondliand. junk or scrap 
material, which shall mean 
storage of any worn-out, 
cast-off, or discarded 
material, ready for 
destruction or collected for 
salvage or conversion for 
some use or for sale. 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 



or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager at the recommendation of the Inspector of Buildings 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 56 was approved as printed in the Warrant. 

VOTE: Declared more than a 2/3 Vote by Moderator A 2/3 Vote Required 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 57. To see if the Town will vote to amend Section II. 14. of the Zoning By-Law 
(definition of Way) by substituting therein the word "mean" for the word "include"or take any 
action related thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager at the recommendation of the Planning Division 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 57 was approved as printed in the Warrant. 

VOTE: Declared more than a 2/3 vote by Moderator A 2/3 Vote Required 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report. Approval 

ARTICLE 58. To see if the Town will vote to amend Section IV.A. of the Zoning By-Law 
(Permitted uses) by adding the word "specifically" as the next to last word in the sentence or take 
any action related thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager at the recommendation of the Planning Division 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 58 was approved as printed in the Warrant. 

VOTE: Declared more than a 2/3 vote by Moderator A 2/3 vote Required 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 59. To see if the Town will vote to add the following definition as number 43. to 
Section II of the Zoning By-Law: 

"43. DRIVEWAY - An accessory use on a lot, privately owned and intended for the passage of 
motor vehicles."or take any action related thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager at the recommendattorfof the Planning Division 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 26. 27, MAY 10, 1 1 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 59 was approved as printed in the Warrant 

VOTE: Declared more than a 2/3 vote by the Moderator A 2/3 Vote Required 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report. Approval 

ARTICLE 60. To see if the Town will vote to add a new subsection 13. to section V.B of the 
Zoning By-Law (Exceptions and special requirements): "13. Except as otherwise provided for in 
this by-law common driveways, shared driveways, or driveway easements on adjacent lots are 
prohibited. Except as otherwise provided for in this by-law each lot intended for building purposes 
shall provide a driveway situated entirely within the frontage and lot area of the lot. "or take any 
action related thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager at the recommendation of the Planning Division 

Upon motion made and seconded Article 60 was moved as printed in the Warrant. 

VOTE: Declared less than a 2/3 vote by the Moderator A 2/3 Vote Required 

Motion DEFEATED 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 

Conservation Board Report: Disapproval 

ARTICLE 61. To see if the Town will vote to amend Section IV.B.4. of the Zoning By-Law by 
striking the words "voted at town meeting" therefrom or take any action related thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager at the recommendation of the Planning Division 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to Withdraw Article 61 by a Majority vote. 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 62. To see if the Town will vote to add a new subsection 14, to Section V.B. of the 
Zoning By-Law (Exceptions and special requirements): "Light poles for the support of lighting 
fixtures on public or private outdoor recreational fields or courts shall not be any greater in height 
than thirty five (35) feet in any zoning district unless otherwise allowed by special permit from the 
Board of Appeals subject to the requirements of Section VI.X. of this by-law."or take any action 
related thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager at the recommendation of the Planning Division 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to Withdraw Article 62 by a Majority vote. 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 63. To see if the Town will vote to add a new subsection VI.X. to the Zoning By-Law 
as follows: 

"VI.X. Light Poles - Design and Location Standards 

Purpose: The purpose of this by-law is to protect properties and neighborhoods adjacent to public or 
private outdoor recreational fields and courts from undue intrusion of lighting associated with those 
uses through reasonable design and location standards. - 148- 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 26. 27. MAY 10. 1 1 

A. Light Poles on Outdoor Recreational Fields or Courts: A Special Permit shall be required for the 
installation of light poles which exceed thirty five (35) feet on public or private outdoor recreational 
fields or courts. Such light poles shall meet the following standards: 

1. The light pole shall be of monopole type of either wood or metal affixed to a base or installed 
in the ground sufficient to safely stand without the use of anchor guys or other supports; 

2. The light pole shall be of sufficient height to properly illuminate the recreational field or court 
but may not exceed a height of seventy (70) feet, 

3. The light pole shall be of such construction that it can safely hold the light fixtures which are 
to be attached to it; 

4. Wherever and whenever possible all electric wires and cables serving the light poles shall be 
installed underground; 

5. Light poles shall be installed as close to the playing area or surface of the field or court as 
practical; and the location of light poles shall be determined by the Special Permit Granting 
Authority with respect to setbacks from property lines and adjacent land uses which may be 
affected; 

6. Only the minimum number of light poles and light fixtures needed to properly illuminate the 
playing area or surface of a field or court will be allowed; 

7. All light fixtures affixed to light poles shall be directed at the playing area or surface of a 
field or court and shall be appropriately shielded if necessary to prevent spillover or glare into or 
onto adjacent properties; 

8. Unless otherwise allowed by a modification of the special permit no additional light fixtures 
may be affixed to any light pole, nor may any light fixture be redirected from its original position; 

9. Light poles subject to these regulations may not be used to illuminate parking areas or any 
other area not laid out or designated as the playing area or surface of a recreational field or court; 

10. The special permit may set forth such times of the day or evening and days of the week that 
the light fixtures on the light poles may be lit or activated according to the particular use and 
location of the recreational field or court, and may require that mechanical timers be installed to 
regulate such times, and that such mechanical timers be secured to prevent unauthorized access; 

1 1 . The application for special permit shall be accompanied by a plan prepared by a professional 
with expertise in the field of lighting which shall depict thereon and at appropriate scale the site or 
property; the location and dimensions of the recreational field(s) or court(s); the locations and 
heights of all proposed light poles and the distance of each to the closest property line; the 
anticipated area of illumination and spillover zones; the number and type of light fixtures; the power 
source and cable routes; a-chart showing specifications of the light poles and light fixtures, 
including mounting and installation details." 

or take any action related thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager at the recommendation of the Planning Division 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to Withdraw Article 63 by a Majority vote. 

ARTICLE 64. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-law as follows: 



(1) Add to Section III.A.2 a new use: 

CGB - Downtown General Business 



149- 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 26, 27, MAY 10, 1 1 

(2) Delete section IV.B 10 & 19 in their entirety and replace it with the following: 





Residence 


Business 


Industrial 


SKA 


SRB 


SRC 


APT 


LS 


OP 


GB 


CGU 


MU 


10 


1A 


ID 


10. Banking or financial 
establishments: 


























a) consumer use located on 
the street level floor 


N 


N 


N 


N 


BA 


N 


Y 


Y 


Y 


DA 


BA 


DA 


b) offices located on the street 
level floor 


N 


N 


N 


N 


BA 


N 


Y 


PB 


Y 


BA 


BA 


BA 


c) offices located on any floor 
other than street level 


N 


N 


N 


N 


BA 


N 


Y 


Y 


Y 


BA 


BA 


BA 


19. Business, professional or 
administrative offices: 


























a) offices located on the street 
level floor 


N 


N 


N 


N 


BA 


BA 


Y 


PB 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


b) offices located on any floor 
other than street level 


N 


N 


N 


N 


BA 


BA 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 



*NOTE All other use regulations in the GB District shall also apply to the CGB District. 

(3) Add to Section VIlI.C.2.a 

(7) Allowance of banking, financial and commercial office in CGB first floor under Section 
IV.B.10&19. 

(4) Remove GB designation from the downtown Main Street area of the Zoning Map of Andover, 

Massachusetts and add a new designation 'CGB' in its place. The remaining GB 
designations inthe Shawsheen and Ballardvale districts are unaffected. 

(5) Add to Section II Definitions, the following: 

'Consumer use' within the context of Section IV.B. 10 is defined to include only those areas 
within banking and financial establishments open to walk-in customers during the course of 
public business hours plus such additional area needed for ancillary uses such as teller space 
or vaults. It specifically excludes all office or meeting space to which the public has little or 
no access. 

On petition of Denis Ryan and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to Withdraw Article 64 by a Majority vote. 

ARTICLE 65. The Town of Andover will vote to accept and name as a public way Noel Road as 
shown on a Plan approved by the Andover Planning Board entitled "Hyatt Crossings" and recorded 
with Essex North District Registry of Deeds as Plan Number 12277 dated July 1993. 

On petition of Hills Mor Construction Co., Inc. and others 

NOT LAID OUT 

ARTICLE 66. To see if the Town will vote to accept and name as a public way, Acorn Drive, as 
shown on a plan approved by the Andover Planning Board, as shown on a Plan entitled, "Definitive 
Subdivision Plan 'Fieldstone Meadows' Andover, Mass. Scale 1"=100' Date: January 15, 1991 
Owner & Applicant Wyncrest Development Corp. 108 Dascomb Road, Andover, Mass. Surveyor 
Andover Consultants, Inc 1 East River Place, Methuen, Mass.", which plan is recorded with Essex 
North District Registry of Deeds as Plan Number 12000. 

On petition of Phillip F. Sullivan and others 

NOT LAID OUT -HP- 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 26. 27. MAY 10. 1 1 



ARTICLE 67. To see if the Town will vote to accept and name as a public way, Basswood Lane, 
as shown on a plan approved by the Andover Planning Board, as shown on a Plan entitled, 
"Definitive Subdivision Plan 'Fieldstone Meadows' Andover, Mass Scale 1"=100' Date January 
15, 1991 Owner & Applicant Wyncrest Development Corp. 108 Dascomb Road, Andover, Mass 
Surveyor Andover Consultants, Inc 1 East River Place, Methuen, Mass.", which plan is recorded 
with Essex North District Registry of Deeds as Plan Number 12000 

On petition of Phillip F. Sullivan and others 

NOT LAID OUT 

ARTICLE 68. To see if the Town will vote to accept and name as a public way, Buttonwood 
Drive, as shown on a plan approved by the Andover Planning Board, as shown on a Plan entitled, 
"Definitive Subdivision Plan 'Fieldstone Meadows' Andover, Mass. Scale 1"=100' Date January 
15, 1991 Owner & Applicant Wyncrest Development Corp. 108 Dascomb Road, Andover, Mass. 
Surveyor Andover Consultants, Inc. 1 East River Place, Methuen, Mass.", which plan is recorded 
with Essex North District Registry of Deeds as Plan Number 12000. 

On petition of Phillip F. Sullivan and others 

NOT LAID OUT 

ARTICLE 69. To see if the Town will vote to accept and name as a public way, Hazelwood 
Circle, as shown on a plan approved by the Andover Planning Board, as shown on a Plan entitled, 
"Definitive Subdivision Plan 'Fieldstone Meadows' Andover, Mass. Scale 1 "=100' Date January 
15, 1991 Owner & Applicant Wyncrest Development Corp. 108 Dascomb Road, Andover, Mass 
Surveyor Andover Consultants, Inc. 1 East River Place, Methuen, Mass.", which plan is recorded 
with Essex North District Registry of Deeds as Plan Number 12000. 

On petition of Phillip F. Sullivan and others 

NOT LAID OUT 

ARTICLE 70. To see if the Town will vote to accept and name as a public way, Meadow View 
Lane, as shown on a plan approved by the Andover Planning Board, as shown on a Plan entitled, 
"Definitive Subdivision Plan 'Fieldstone Meadows' Andover, Mass. Scale 1 "=100' Date January 
15, 1991 Owner & Applicant Wyncrest Development Corp. 108 Dascomb Road, Andover, Mass. 
Surveyor Andover Consultants, Inc. 1 East River Place, Methuen, Mass.", which plan is recorded 
with Essex North District Registry of Deeds as Plan Number 12000. 

On petition of Phillip F. Sullivan and others 

NOT LAID OUT 

ARTICLE 71. To see if the Town will vote to accept and name as a public way, Radcliffe Drive, 
as shown on a plan approved by the Andover Planning Board, as shown on a Plan entitled, 
"Definitive Plan of Belmont Park in Andover, Mass." dated June 8, 1973 and recorded with Essex 
North District Registry of Deeds as Plan Number 6985. 

On petition of Phillip F. Sullivan and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 71 was approved as printed in the Warrant by a 
Majority vote. 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 

-151- 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 26. 27. MAY 10. 1 1 

ARTICLE 72. To see if the. Town will vote to accept and name as a public way, Yardley Road, as 
shown on a plan approved by the Andover Planning Board, as shown on a Plan entitled, "Definitive 
Plan of Belmont Park in Andover, Mass." dated June 8, 1973 and recorded with Essex North 
District Registry of Deeds as Plan Number 6985 

On petition of Phillip F. Sullivan and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 72 was approved as printed in the Warrant by a 
Majority vote 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 73. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation or by transfer from available funds 
or by a combination of the foregoing and appropriate up to $2,500 for the preparation by the 
Andover Recycling Committee of a report on: 1) pay per bag collection of residential refuse, and 2) 
a survey of public opinion about such a policy, said report to be delivered by October 1, 1999. 

On petition of Michael Frishman and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved to approve Article 73 as printed in the 
Warrant in the amount of $2,500 from available funds. 



Article 73 was DEFEATED by a Majority vote. 

Finance Committee Report: Disapproval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was voted to adjourn at 10:00 P.M., until Tuesday, May 
1 1, 1999 at 7:00 P. M. at the Collins Center, Andover High School, Shawsheen Road. 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - May 11. 1999 

The check lists were used at the entrance and showed 498 voters were admitted to the meeting. 

The meeting was called to order by James Doherty, Moderator, at 7:00 P.M. 

By unanimous consent it was voted to admit twenty-one (21)) non-voters to the meeting and to 
escort non-voters to the non-voter section thereafter. 

ARTICLE 74. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by transfer from available funds, 
by borrowing, in accordance with the provisions of Chapter 44, Section 7, Clauses 5 and 9 of the 
Massachusetts General Laws or any other enabling authority, or by any combination of the 
foregoing and appropriate a sum not to exceed $800,000 for making streetscape improvements 
(including but not limited to the acquisition and installation of street lights, trees, benches, etc.) 
incidental and related to the Main Street/Route 28 reconstruction to be undertaken by the Town in 
accordance with the terms of a $2.5 million Massachusetts Highway Department grant, and to 
authorize the Board of Selectmen to apply for and accept any other state or federal grants that may 
be available for this purpose or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 74 was moved as printed in the Warrant in the 
amount of $304,000 by borrowing. 



•152- 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING- APRIL 26. 27. MAY 10, 11 

VOTE: Declared more than a 2/3 Vote by Moderator A 2/3 Vote Required 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 75. To see if the Town will vote to amend the General By-laws of the Town by adding 
the following: 

Section 1 : Purpose 

The purpose of this bylaw is to protect the wetlands, related water resources, and adjoining land 
areas in the Town of Andover by controlling activities likely to have a significant or cumulative 
effect upon the important public values of those areas, which include, without limitation, the 
following: public or private water supply, groundwater supply, flood control, erosion and 
sedimentation control, storm damage prevention, protection of surrounding land and other homes or 
buildings, prevention of pollution of groundwater and surface water, fisheries, wildlife habitat, 
recreation, and the historic and natural scenic character of wetland resource areas, watercourses, 
lakes and ponds (collectively, the "values protected by this bylaw"). 

Section 2: Jurisdiction 

Except as permitted by the Conservation Commission or as provided in Section 3 of this bylaw, 
no person shall remove, fill, dredge, build upon, degrade, or otherwise alter the following resource 
areas: any bank, freshwater wetland, marsh, wet meadow, bog, swamp, vernal pool, reservoir, lake, 
pond, creek, river or stream, or any land under said waters, or any land within 100 feet of any of the 
aforesaid resource areas, or any land subject to flooding or inundation by groundwater or surface 
water, or within 200 feet of any river (collectively, the "resource areas protected by this bylaw"). 

Section 3: Exceptions 

The application and permit required by this bylaw shall not be required for maintaining, 
repairing or replacing, but not substantially changing or enlarging, an existing and lawfully located 
structure or facility used in the service of the public and used to provide electric, gas, water, sewer, 
telephone, telegraph and other telecommunication services, or the installation of new municipal 
utilities, provided that written notice has been given to the Commission prior to the commencement 
of the work, and provided that the work conforms to performance standards and design 
specifications in any regulations adopted by the Commission. 

The application and permit required by this bylaw shall not be required for work performed for 
normal maintenance or improvement of land in agricultural use, provided that written notice has 
been given to the Commission prior to commencement of work, and provided that the work 
conforms to performance standards and design specifications in regulations adopted by the 
Commission. 

The application and permit required by this bylaw shall not apply to emergency projects 
necessary for the protection of the health and safety of the public, provided that the work is to be 
performed by or has been ordered to the performed by an agency of the Commonwealth or a 
political subdivision thereof, provided that advance notice, oral or written, has been given to the 
Commission prior to commencement of work or within 24 hours after commencement; provided 
that the Commission or its agent certifies the work as an emergency project; provided that the work 
is performed only for the time and place certified by the Commission for the limited purposes 
necessary to abate the emergency; and provided that within 21 days of commencement of an 
emergency project a permit application shall be filed with the Commission for review as provided 
by this bylaw. Upon failure to meet these and other requirements of the Commission, the 
Commission may, after notice and a public hearing, revoke or modify an emergency project 
approval and order restoration and mitigation measures. 

The application and permit required by this bylaw shall nofbe required for work which is 
performed in connection with the ordinary maintenance or improvement of a single- or two-family 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING -APRIL 26. 27. MAY 10, 11 

house lawfully in existence or for which a building permit had been issued on or before January 1, 
1999, including, but not limited to, building additions, septic system replacements and sewer 
connections, and the conversion of lawn to accessory uses such as decks, sheds, patios and pools 

The application and permit required by this bylaw shall not be required for the maintenance and 
repair of buildings, other structures, driveways, roads, parking areas, drainage structures and basins, 
lawns or athletic fields in existence on January 1, 1999, provided that such work is conducted in 
conformity with any general guidelines or performance standards which the Conservation 
Commission may, by regulation, adopt to protect the interests identified in Section 1 of this Bylaw 

Other than stated in this section, the exceptions, exemptions and grandfathered activities 
provided in the Wetlands Protection Act, G. L. c. 13 1 § 40, and Regulations, 310 CMR 10.00, shall 
not apply under this bylaw. 

Section 4: Applications for Permits and Requests for Determination 

Written application shall be filed with the Commission to perform activities affecting resource 
areas protected by this bylaw. The permit application shall include such information and plans as 
are deemed necessary by the Commission to describe proposed activities and their effects on the 
resource areas protected by this bylaw. No activities shall commence without receiving and 
complying with a permit issued pursuant to the bylaw. 

The Commission in an appropriate case may accept as the permit application and plans under 
this bylaw the Notice of Intent and plans filed under the Wetlands Protection Act, G.L. c. 13 1, § 40, 
and Regulations, 310 CMR 10.00. 

Any person desiring to know whether or not a proposed activity or an area is subject to this 
bylaw may in writing request a determination from the Commission. Such a request for 
determination shall include information and plans as are deemed necessary by the Commission. 
The Commission may determine that a proposed activity or an area is not subject to this bylaw 
subject to the observance of conditions by the applicant. 

Section 5: Fees 

Section 5.1: Administrative Fee 

The Commission is authorized to include in any regulations adopted under this bylaw a fee 
schedule imposing fees for permits, determinations and certificates of compliance. Such fees 
must be based on a reasonable estimate of the actual costs incurred by the Commission in 
carrying out its duties under this bylaw, taking into account any fees provided under the 
Wetlands Protection Act. Failure to pay any fee required by regulations duly promulgated by 
the Commission shall be grounds for denial of the application. 

Section 5.2 Consultant Fees 

The Commission is authorized to require the applicant to pay the reasonable costs and 
expenses borne by the Commission for specific expert engineering and consulting services 
deemed necessary by the Commission to review any application. The maximum consultant 
fee to be charged shall be according to the following schedule: 



Project Cost 


Maximum Fee 


UP TO $250,000 


NO FEE 


$250,001 to $500,000 


$2,500 


$500,001 to $1,000,000 


$5,000 


$1,000,001 to $1,500,000 


$7,500 


$1,500,001 AND ABOVE 


$10,000 



The project cost means the estimated, entire cost of the project including, without limitation, 
building construction, site preparation, landscaping, and all site improvements, but excluding 
land acquisition. Projects shall not be segmented to avoid being subject to a consultant fee. 
The applicant shall submit estimated project costs at the Commission's request. Consulting 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 26. 27. MAY 10. 1 1 

services may include, without limitation, the delineation and survey of wetland resource 
areas, analysis of resource area values, hydrogeological and drainage analyses, evaluation of 
wildlife habitat, and legal services. The Commission is authorized to charge the applicant for 
said fee based upon its reasonable finding that the additional information acquirable only 
through outside consultants would be necessary for the making of an objective decision, and 
when the application or request for determination proposes any of the following: 

(a) the alteration of more than 500 square feet or more of any land under a water body or 
bordering vegetated wetlands; 

(b) the alteration of 50 linear feet or more of the bank of any water body or waterway; 

(c) the alteration of five thousand (5000) square feet or more of the buffer zone, or 

(d) the creation or evaluation of any point source discharge, detention or retention basin, 
water control structure or wetland replication area. 

The Commission may also impose such a fee of up to $1.50 per linear foot when requested to 
make a determination of the boundary line of any resource area pursuant to a request for 
determination of applicability or notice of resource area delineation relative to any wetlands 
boundary exceeding 250 linear feet. 

Said fee may be requested of the applicant within thirty (30) days of the filing of the 
application, or from the last amendment thereto. In its request, the Commission shall identify 
the consultant it has selected and include an estimate of the charges for the proposed services. 
The applicant may appeal from the selection of the consultant to the Town Manager within 
ten (10) days of receiving notice from the Commission of the same. The Town Manager may 
set aside the selection of the consultant only if the consultant lacks sufficient qualifications to 
perform the work or has a conflict of interest. 

The Commission shall comply with the applicable competitive bidding requirements set forth 
in G.L. c. 30B before engaging a consultant under the provisions of this section. 

If a revolving fund for consultant expenses and fees is authorized by town meeting vote, or 
by any general or special law, the applicant's fee shall be put into such revolving fund and the 
Commission may draw upon that fund for specific consultant services approved by the 
Commission at one of its public meetings. Any unused portion of said fee shall be returned 
to the applicant. 

Section 5. 3 Waiver/Non- Applicability of Fees 

No application or consultant fees shall be due from the Town of Andover or the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts in connection with any project performed by the Town or 
on its behalf, or from any person having no financial connection with a property which is the 
subject of a request for determination. 

Section 6: Notice and Hearings 

Any person filing a permit application or a request for determination with the Commission at the 
same time shall give written notice thereof, by certified mail (return receipt requested) or hand 
delivered, to all abutters at their mailing addresses shown on the most recent applicable tax list of 
the assessors. The notice to abutters shall enclose a copy of the permit application or request, with 
plans, or shall state where copies may be examined and obtained by abutters. An affidavit of the 
person providing such notice, with a copy of the notice mailed or delivered, shall be filed with the 
Commission. When a person requesting a determination is other than the owner, the request, the 
notice of the hearing, and the determination itself shall be sent by the Commission to the owner as 
well as to the person making the request. 

The Commission shall conduct a public hearing on any permit application or request for 
determination, with written notice given at the expense of the applicant, not less than five business 
days prior to the hearing, in a newspaper of general circulation in the Town of Andover. 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 26, 27, MAY 10, 1 1 

The Commission shall commence the public hearing within 21 days from receipt of a completed 
permit application or request for determination unless an extension is authorized in writing by the 
applicant 

The Commission shall issue its permit or determination in writing within 21 days of the close of 
the public hearing thereon unless an extension is authorized in writing by the applicant 

The Commission in an appropriate case may combine its hearing under this bylaw with the 
hearing conducted under the Wetlands Protection Act, G L. c 131, § 40, and Regulations, 310 
CMR 10.00. Notice of a hearing so combined shall not be considered defective solely because it 
fails to make reference to this bylaw. 

The Commission shall have authority to continue the hearing to a date certain announced at the 
hearing, for reasons stated at the hearings, which may include receipt of additional information 
offered by the applicant deemed necessary by the Commission in its discretion, or comments and 
recommendations of the boards and officials listed in Section 9. In the event the applicant objects 
to a continuance or postponement, the hearing shall be closed and the Commission shall take action 
on such information as is available. 

Section 7: Burden of Proof 

The applicant shall have the burden of proving by a preponderance of the credible evidence that 
the work proposed in the permit application will not have unacceptable significant or cumulative 
effect upon the values protected by this bylaw. Failure to provide adequate evidence to the 
Commission supporting this burden shall be sufficient cause for the Commission to deny such 
permit or to grant a permit with conditions. 

Section 8: Permits and Conditions 

If, after said hearing, the Commission determines that the activities which are subject to the 
permit application are likely to have a significant or cumulative effect upon the values protected by 
this bylaw, the Commission, within 21 days of the close of the public hearing or such further time 
as the Commission and the applicant shall agree on, shall issue or deny a permit for the activities 
proposed. If it issues a permit, the Commission shall impose conditions which it deems necessary 
or desirable to protect those values, and all work shall be done in accordance with those conditions. 

The Commission is empowered to deny a permit for failure to meet the requirements of this 
bylaw; for failure to submit necessary information and plans requested by the Commission; for 
failure to meet the design specifications, performance standards, and other requirements in 
regulations of the Commission; for failure to avoid or prevent unacceptable significant or 
cumulative effects upon the values protected by this bylaw; and where no conditions are adequate to 
protect those values. The Commission may waive the provisions of this bylaw upon the written 
request of any applicant for a determination or permit, when in its judgment, such action is 
consistent with the purpose and intent of this bylaw, and when strict enforcement of the 
requirements of this bylaw would result in hardship to the applicant. 

Lands within 200 feet of rivers, and lands within 100 feet of other resource areas, are presumed 
important to the protection of these resources because activities undertaken in close proximity to 
resource areas have a high likelihood of adverse impact upon the wetland or watercourse, either 
immediately, as a consequence of construction, or over time, as a consequence of daily operation or 
existence of those activities. In addition, such areas are often vital to the preservation of species 
that depend on wetlands for food or reproduction The Commission may therefore require that the 
applicant maintain a continuous strip of continuous, undisturbed vegetative cover within the 200- 
foot [or 100-foot] area, unless the applicant demonstrates that the area or part of it may be disturbed 
without harm to the values protected by this bylaw. 

In reviewing proposed activity in areas within 200 feet of rivers, no permit issued hereunder 
shall permit any activities unless the applicant, in addition to meeting the otherwise applicable 
requirements of this bylaw, has proved by a preponderance of th; evidence that (1) there is no 
practicable alternative to the proposed project with less adverse effects, and that (2) such activities, 
taking into account proposed mitigation measures, will have no significant impact on the values 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 26. 27. MAY 10. 11 

protected by this bylaw. The Commission shall regard as practicable an alternative which is 
reasonably available and capable of being done after taking into consideration the proposed use of 
the property, the overall project purpose (e.g., residential, institutional, commercial, or industrial 
purpose), logistics, existing technology, and costs. 

To prevent wetlands loss, the Commission shall require applicants to avoid wetlands alteration 
wherever feasible, to minimize wetlands alteration, and where alteration is unavoidable, to 
incorporate mitigation measures into the project design. 

A permit shall expire three years from the date of issuance. Notwithstanding the above, the 
Commission in its discretion may issue a permit of unlimited duration for recurring or continuous 
maintenance work, provided that annual notification of time and location of work is given to the 
Commission. Any permit may be renewed for one or more additional periods of up to three years, 
provided that a request for a renewal is received in writing by the Commission at least 30 days prior 
to expiration. 

For good cause the Commission may revoke or modify a permit or determination issued under 
this bylaw after notice to the holder of the permit or determination, notice to the publicTabutters, 
and town boards, pursuant to Section 5 and 6, and a public hearing. 

The Commission in an appropriate case may combine the permit or determination issued under 
this bylaw with the Order of Conditions or Determination of Applicability issued under the 
Wetlands Protection Act, G.L. c. 131, § 40, and Regulations, 310 CMR 10.00. 

No work proposed in any permit application shall be undertaken until the permit issued by the 
Commission with respect to such work has been recorded in the Registry of Deeds or, if the land 
affected is registered land, in the registry section of the land court for the district wherein the land 
lies, and until the holder of the permit certifies in writing to the Commission that the permit has 
been recorded. 

Section 9: Coordination with Other Boards 

Any person filing a permit application or request for determination of applicability shall give 
notice thereof by certified mail or hand delivery to the Planning Board, the Board of Health and 
Board of Selectmen. If a permit is required from the Board of Appeals, the applicant shall also 
furnish a copy to that Board. 

The Commission shall, to the extent practicable, coordinate with any other Board reviewing the 
project, and having similar authority to recover its consulting fees from the applicant, in an effort to 
avoid duplication of consulting services. 

Section 10: Security 

As part of a permit issued under this bylaw, the Commission may require, in addition to any 
security required by any other town or state board, commission, agency or officer, that the 
performance and observance of the conditions imposed hereunder be secured wholly or in part by 
one or more of the methods described below: 

(a) by a proper bond or deposit of money or negotiable securities, sufficient in the opinion 
of the Conservation Commission to secure performance of the conditions and observance of 
the safeguards of such permit, to be released upon the issuance of a certificate of compliance 
for work performed pursuant to the permit; or 

(b) by a conservation restriction, easement, or other covenant enforceable in a court of law, 
executed and duly recorded by the owner of record, running with the land to the benefit of the 
Commission whereby the permit conditions shall be performed and observed before any lot 
may be conveyed other than by mortgage deed. 

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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING -APRIL 26. 27. MAY 10, 11 

Section 1 1 : Regulations . 

The Commission shall promulgate after due notice and public hearing Rules and Regulations to 
effectuate the purposes of this bylaw, including rules requiring the maintenance of an undisturbed 
vegetated buffer of not more than twenty- five (25) feet from the edge of any bank, freshwater 
wetland, marsh, wet meadow, bog, swamp, reservoir, lake; pond, creek, river or stream, or any land 
under said waters, except in the Fish Brook/Haggetts Pond Watershed Protection Overlay District, 
and/or a vernal pool, where such rules may require an undisturbed vegetated buffer of not more than 
fifty (50) feet from those resource areas Failure by the Commission to promulgate such rules and 
regulations or a legal declaration of their invalidity by a court of law shall not act to invalidate or 
suspend the effect of this bylaw. 

Section 12; Enforcement 

No person shall remove, fill, dredge, build upon, degrade, or otherwise alter resource areas 
protected by this bylaw, or cause, suffer, or allow such activity to continue or allow such fill or 
other alteration to be left in place, without the required authorization pursuant to this bylaw. 

The Commission, its agents, officers, and employees shall have authority, with prior approval 
from the property owner or pursuant to court process, to enter upon privately owned land for the 
purpose of performing their duties under this bylaw and may make or cause to be made such 
examinations, surveys, or sampling as the Commission deems necessary. 

The Commission shall have authority to enforce this bylaw, its regulations, and permits issued 
thereunder by violation notices, administrative orders, and civil and criminal court actions. Any 
person who violates provisions of this bylaw may be ordered to restore the property to its original 
condition and take other action deemed necessary to remedy such violations. 

Upon request of the Commission, the Town Manager and Town Counsel, with the approval of 
the Board of Selectmen, may take legal action for enforcement under civil law. Upon request of the 
Commission, the chief of police may take legal action for enforcement under criminal law. 

Municipal boards and officers, including any police officer or other officer having police 
powers, shall have authority to assist the Commission in enforcement. 

Any person who violates any provision of this bylaw, or regulations, permits, or administrative 
orders issued thereunder, shall be punished by a fine of not more than $300. Each day or portion 
thereof during which a violation continues, or unauthorized fill or other alteration remains in place, 
shall constitute a separate offense, and each provision of the bylaw, regulations, permit, or 
administrative order violated shall constitute a separate offense. 

As an alternative to criminal prosecution in a specific case, the Commission may issue citations 
under the non-criminal disposition procedure set forth in G. L. c. 40, § 2 ID. 

Section 14: Relation to Wetlands Protection Act 

This bylaw is adopted under the Home Rule Amendment of the Massachusetts Constitution and 
the Home Rule statutes, independent of the of the Wetlands Protection Act, G. L. c. 13 1, § 40, and 
regulations, 310 CMR 10.00, thereunder. 

Section 15: Severability 

The invalidity of any section or provision of this bylaw shall not invalidate any other section or 
provision thereof, nor shall in invalidate any Order of Conditions which has previously become 
final 

Section 16: Effective Date 

This bylaw shall take effect as provided in General Lawg.j^l^pter 40, Section 32, and shall 
apply to any activity described herein which occurs after its effective date, except that this bylaw 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 26. 27. MAY 10. 1 1 

shall not apply to any activity described in a Notice of Intent or Request for Determination of 
Applicability filed with the Conservation Commission under the Wetlands Protection Act on or 
before the date of its adoption by Town Meeting vote, provided that such activity is subsequently 
approved in a final Order of Conditions or Determination of Applicability issued under the said Act 

Section 17: Definitions 

The following definitions shall apply in the interpretation and implementation of this bylaw. 

Abutter - the owner of any land within 100 feet of the property line of the land where the 
activity is proposed, as determined by the most recent assessors' records, including any land located 
directly across a street, way, river, stream, or pond. 

Alter - to change the conditions of any area subject to protection by this bylaw and shall include 
but not be limited to one or more of the following actions upon areas described in this bylaw: 

(a) the removal, excavation or dredging of soil, sand, gravel or aggregate material of any 
kind; 

(b) the changing of pre-existing drainage characteristics, flushing characteristics, salinity 
distribution, sedimentation patterns, flow patterns and flood storage retention areas; 

(c) the drainage, disturbance or lowering of the water level or water table; 

(d) the dumping, discharging or filling with any material which could degrade the water 
quality; 

(e) the driving of piling, erection of buildings or structures of any kind; 

(f) the placing of any object or obstruction whether or not it interferes with the flow of water; 

(g) the destruction of plant life, including the cutting of trees; 

(h) the changing of water temperature, biochemical oxygen demand and other natural 
characteristics of the receiving water; 

(i) any activities, changes or work which pollutes any body of water or groundwater; 

(j) the application of pesticides or herbicides. 

Cumulative effect - an effect that is significant when considered in combination with other 
activities that have occurred, are going on simultaneously, or that are likely to occur, whether such 
other activities have occurred or are contemplated as a separate phase of the same project, such as 
the build-out of a subdivision or an industrial park, or unrelated but reasonably foreseeable actions, 
including other development projects that are currently under construction, under review or that 
may be expected to come forward. 

Freshwater wetland, marsh, wet meadow, bog, or swamp - includes any area bordering a water 
body, or, if not bordering a water body, consisting of at least five thousand (5000) square feet, 
where surface or ground water, or ice, at or near the surface of the ground support the presence of 
hydric soils and/or a plant community dominated (at least 50 per cent) by wetland species To 
avoid inconsistencies in delineation of such resource areas under this bylaw and the Wetlands 
Protection Act, the method for determining the edge of any such wetland shall be the same as that 
approved by the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection for delineating the edge of 
bordering vegetated wetlands under the said Act, as such rules or regulations may be amended from 
time to time 

Groundwater - all subsurface water contained in natural geologic formations or artificial fill, 
including soil water in the zone of aeration. Activities in or.wjjKJD 100 feet of resource areas shall 
not significantly alter the existing quality or elevation of naturally-occurring ground water. 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 26, 27, MAY 10, 1 1 

Person - any individual, group or individuals, association, partnership, corporation, business 
organization, trust, estate, the Commonwealth of Massachusetts when subject to town bylaws, any 
public or quasi-public corporation or body when subject to town bylaws, or any other legal entity, 
including the Town of Andover or its legal representative, agents or assigns 

Private water supp ly - any source or volume of surface or ground water demonstrated to be in 
private use or shown to have potential for private use, including ground or surface water in the zone 
of contribution around a private well. Activities in or within 100 feet of a resource area shall not 
have a significant effect on the quality of a private water supply. 

Public water supp ly - any source or volume of surface or ground water demonstrated to be in 
public use or approved for water supply pursuant to G.L. c. 1 1 1, § 160 by the Department of 
Environmental Protection Division of Water Supply, or demonstrated to have a potential for public 
use, in addition to all surface and ground water in zones of contribution. Activities subject to the 
Commission's jurisdiction under this Bylaw shall not have a significant effect on the quality of a 
public water supply. 

Wildlife habitat - an area that provides breeding and nesting habitat, shelter, food and water to 
animal species. Includes areas identified as containing rare, threatened or endangered species as 
listed by the Massachusetts Natural Heritage Program. Structures and activities in any resource area 
shall not have a significant adverse effect on wildlife habitat. 

Except as otherwise provided in this bylaw or in regulations of the Commission, the definitions 
of terms in this bylaw shall be as set forth in the Wetlands Protection Act, G. L. c. 131, § 40, and 
regulations, 310 CMR 10.00, thereunder. 

or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Conservation Commission 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 75 was approved as printed in the Warrant by a 
Majority vote. 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: No position 

Conservation Board Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 76, To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Town Manager and the Board of 
Selectmen to file special legislation for the establishment of a special account for fees collected for 
the employment of outside consultants by the Conservation Commission to review applications or 
take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Conservation Commission 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 76 was approved as printed in the Warrant by a 
Majority vote. 

Board of Selectmen Report. Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 

Conservation Board Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 77. To see if the Town will vote to amend the General Bylaws of the Town of Andover 
by inserting in the appropriate place the following: 

1 . All articles in the warrant shall be numbered sequentially by the Board of Selectmen. At Town 
Meeting, the Town Clerk shall place all article numbers in a container. The Town Moderator 
shall draw a number and that article shall be presented to Town Meeting for action. Another 
number may not be drawn until Town Meeting has acted upon that article. 

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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 26. 27. MAY 10, 11 

2. Certain articles that are related to each other (or one another) - whereby the passage of the 

article is dependent upon the action of another article - shall be taken as one drawing for 
action. 

3 . When the Budget (Omnibus) article is drawn, the order of consideration of said article shall be 

drawn from a second container, which shall contain function headings: Administration, 
Public Safety, Public Works, Education, etc. 

4. During Town Meeting, after an article has been acted upon and prior to another number being 

drawn, any voter may move to consider any remaining article. This motion shall require a 
four-fifths vote of Town Meeting. 

5. Once an article has been drawn, any voter may move to postpone consideration to another time. 

Such motion shall require a two-thirds vote of Town Meeting. 

6. The official records of each Town Meeting shall report the articles in the order as printed in the 

warrant. 

On petition of John Doyle and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 77 was DEFEATED by a Majority vote. 

Board of Selectmen Report: Disapproval 

ARTICLE 78. To request the Town's financial support of $40,000 to fight for removal of the 100- 
foot cellular tower installed on the Andover/Lawrence Town line by Nextel Communications of 
Mid- Atlantic. 

On petition of Patricia Scarborough and others 

Upon motion made by the petitioner and duly seconded it was VOTED to Withdraw Article 78 by a 
Majority vote. 

ARTICLE 79. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to accept a grant 
of land for purposes of expanding the existing layout of a portion of Stevens Street along the 
frontage of 5 Stevens Street (Assessors Map 37, Lot 24), at no cost to the Town and upon the terms 
and conditions which the Board of Selectmen deems in the best interest of the Town, which layout 
expansion involves strips of land on the north side of Stevens Street totaling between approximately 
1,000-2,000 square feet, to be depicted on a plan of land duly recorded with the Registry of Deeds 
and acceptable in all respects to the Board of Selectmen; or take any other action relative thereto. 

On petition of Northpoint Realty Development Corp. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to Withdraw Article 79 by a Majority vote. 

ARTICLE 80. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation and appropriate $400,000 for the 
purpose of constructing or reconstructing sidewalks, including installing granite curbs, planting 
trees and any other costs incidental and related and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire 
any necessary easements by gift, purchase, or eminent domain or take any other action related 
thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager as recommended by the Public Works Director 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 80 was approved as printed in the Warrant in the 
amount of $400,000 from taxation. 

VOTE: Declared more than a 2/3 vote by Moderator A 2/3 Vote Required 

Finance Committee Report: Approval iz-i 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 26. 27. MAY 10. 1 1 

ARTICLE 81. To see if the Town will vote to publish and maintain a five-year plan, to be updated 
annually in conjunction with or as part of the Capital Improvement Plan, that lists the sections of 
sidewalk to be reconstructed during each of the next five years, and that is consistent with the 
proposed annual budget for sidewalk reconstruction. 

On petition of Harry L. Voorhees, Jr. and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 8 1 was approved as printed in the Warrant by a 
Majority vote. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Disapproval 

ARTICLE 82. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by transfer from available funds, 
by borrowing, by appropriation of Chapter 90 highway funds or by any combination of the 
foregoing and appropriate an additional sum of $400,000 for the purpose of reconstructing 
sidewalks including installing granite curbs and planting strips with trees or any other costs 
incidental or related thereto, and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire any necessary 
easements by gift, purchase, or eminent domain or take any other action related thereto. 

On petition of Thomas P. Cody and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved that the Town vote to raise by borrowing and 
appropriate the sum of $400,000 for the purpose of reconstructing sidewalks including installing 
granite curbs and planting strips with trees or any other costs incidental or related thereto, and to 
authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire any necessary easements by gift, purchase, or eminent 
domain; and that to meet this appropriation, the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of 
Selectmen, be authorized to borrow said sum under and pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 7, clause 5 
of the Massachusetts General Laws, or any other enabling authority, and to issue bonds or notes of 
the town thereof. 

Article 82 was DEFEATED 

VOTE: YES: 192 NO: 186 A 2/3 Vote Required 

Finance Committee Report: Disapproval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Disapproval 
Planning Board Report: Disapproval 

ARTICLE 83. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by transfer from available funds, 
by borrowing, or by any combination of the foregoing and appropriate the sum of $150,000 for the 
purpose of constructing a new bituminous concrete sidewalk with granite curb on the east side of 
Salem Street from Prospect Road to Route 125; and further to authorize the Board of Selectmen to 
acquire by gift, by purchase or by seizure by right of eminent domain such land as may be required 
for this sidewalk; or take any other action related thereto, including easements. 

On petition of Elizabeth Dufton and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved that the Town vote to raise by borrowing and 
appropriate the sum of $150,000 for the purpose of constructing a new bituminous concrete 
sidewalk with granite curb on the east side of Salem Street from Prospect Road to Route 125; and 
further to authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire by gift, by purchase or by seizure by right of 
eminent domain; and that to meet this appropriation, the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board 
of Selectmen, be authorized to borrow said sum under and pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 7, clause 
5 of the Massachusetts General Laws, or any other enabling authority, and to issue bonds or notes of 
the town thereof. 



■162- 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 26. 27. MAY 10, 1 1 

VOTE: Declared more than a 2/3 Vote by Moderator A 2/3 Vote Required 

Finance Committee Report: Disapproval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 84. To see if the Town will vote to amend the General By-laws of the Town by adding 
the following: 

SECTION 1. TITLE 

This By-Law shall be known and may be cited as the Shawsheen Village Historic District By-Law 
and is adopted pursuant to Chapter 40C of the General Laws of the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts, as amended. 

SECTION 2. PURPOSE 

The purpose of this By-Law is to promote the educational, cultural, economic, and general welfare 
of the public through the preservation and protection of distinctive historical buildings and places in 
the Shawsheen Village area of the Town of Andover through the maintenance and improvement of 
such buildings and places and the encouragement of appropriate and convertible design in this area 

SECTION 3. HISTORIC DISTRICT 

There is hereby established under the provisions of Chapter 40C of the General Laws an historic 
district to be known as the Shawsheen Village Historic District, which District shall be bounded as 
shown on the Map, entitled "Shawsheen Village Historic District, 1999", attached and made part of 
this By-Law. 

SECTION 4 DEFINITIONS 

ALTERED - Includes the words "rebuilt", "reconstructed", "restored", "removed" and 
"demolished". 

APPLICANT - the owner of record of the building or structure at the time of filing of an 
application for permit or an individual designated, in writing, as a representative of the owner of 
record. 

BUILDING - A combination of materials forming a shelter for persons, animals, or property. 

COMMISSION - The Shawsheen Village Historic District Commission. 

CONSTRUCTED - Includes the words "built", "erected", "installed", "enlarged", and "moved". 

DAYS - For the purposes of this By-Law, "days" shall mean calendar days. 

DISTRICT - Shawsheen Village Historic District 

EXTERIOR ARCHITECTURAL FEATURE - A portion of the exterior of a building or structure as 
is open to view from a public street, public way, public park, or public body of water; including but 
not limited to the architectural style and general arrangement and setting thereof, the kind and 
texture of exterior building materials, and the type and style of windows, doors, lights, signs, and 
other appurtenant exterior fixtures. 

PERSON AGGRIEVED - The applicant, an owner of adjoining property, an owner of property 
within the historic district, and any charitable corporation in which one of its purposes is the 
preservation of historic structures. 

SITE - Any parcel of real property within the District. , ,--, 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 26, 27, MAY 10, 1 1 

STRUCTURE - A combination of materials other than a building including but not limited to a 
sign, fence, wall terrace, lighting, walk or driveway. 

TOWN - Town of Andover 

SECTION 5 SHAWSHEEN VILLAGE HISTORIC DISTRICT COMMISSION 

There is hereby established under Chapter 40C of the General Laws an Historic District 
Commission consisting of five (5) members and one (1) alternate members, all residents of the 
Town of Andover appointed by the Town Manager and approved by the Board of Selectmen, 
including one member, where possible, from two nominees submitted by the Andover Preservation 
Commission, one member, where possible, from two nominees submitted by the Andover Historical 
Society, one member, where possible, from two nominees submitted by the Andover Planning 
Board, one member, where possible, from two nominees submitted by the Shawsheen Village 
business community, and one member who is both a resident and owner of property in the 
Shawsheen Village Historic District. Where possible, all members shall be both residents and 
owners of property in the District. 

The Town Manager and the Board of Selectmen shall submit written requests for nominations to the 
organizations named herein. If no nomination has been made within thirty days of submitting a 
request, the Town Manager and the Board of Selectmen may proceed without waiting for the 
requested nomination. 

When the Commission is first established, two (2) members shall be appointed for three- 
year terms, and two (2) members shall be appointed for two-year terms, and one (1) member and 
one alternate member shall be appointed for one-year terms. Successors shall be appointed for a 
term of three years. Vacancies shall be filled within sixty days by the Town Manager by 
appointment with approval by the Board of Selectmen for the unexpired term. 

In the case of absence, inability to act, or unwillingness to act because of self-interest by a member, 
the chairperson may designate an alternate member of the Commission to act for a specified time. If 
any member is absent from three consecutive Commission meetings, the chairperson may appoint 
an alternate member as a replacement to serve for the remainder of that member's term, whereupon 
the Town Manager shall appoint and the Board of Selectmen approve a new alternate member. Each 
member and alternate member shall continue in office until his or her successor is duly appointed. 
Any members and alternate members shall serve without compensation. 

The Commission shall elect annually a chairperson, a vice chairperson, and a secretary from its own 
number. Meetings of the Commission shall be held only if attended by a quorum of at least three (3) 
members, including alternate members designated to act as members. If the chairperson is absent 
from a meeting, the vice chairperson shall act as chairperson. Decisions of the Commission at a 
meeting require a majority vote of the members, including designated alternate, who are present at 
the meeting. 

SECTION 6. POWERS AND DUTIES OF THE COMMISSION 

A. The Commission shall have all of the powers and duties of historic district commissions as 
provided by Chapter 40C of the General Laws, and by subsequent amendments thereto, unless 
specifically limited by this By-Law. The Commission may adopt rules and regulations not 
inconsistent with the provisions of Chapter 40C. Any proposed changes to these rules & 
regulations, including the detailed review guidelines of the Commission, must first be heard via a 
public hearing in which formal public notice must be given at least 14 days in advance of the 
hearing. However, no changes can be made to this By-Law without a 2/3 majority vote at Town 
Meeting and then these changes do not become effective until the conditions outlined in Section 12 
of this By-Law are met. 

The Commission may, subject to appropriation, employ clerical and technical assistants or 
Consultants and incur other expenses appropriate to the carrying on of its work and may accept 
money gifts and expend the same for such purposes when reviewed by Town Counsel and approved 
by the Board of Selectmen. The Commission may administer oiibehalf of the Town any properties 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 26. 27. MAY 10. 1 1 

G. A Certificate of Non- Applicability is for matters specifically excluded from review of the 
Commission and will only be issued upon request from an applicant. 

H. A Certificate of Hardship shall be issued by the Commission in the following circumstances: 

a. if the application is deemed inappropriate or if the application is specifically made for a 
Certificate of Hardship, then a Certificate of Hardship may be issued if conditions especially 
effecting the building or structure involved, but not affecting the Historic District generally, would 
result in a substantial hardship, financial or otherwise, to the applicant AND if approval would not 
result in a substantial detriment to the public welfare. 

b. the Commission does not make a determination of an application within the time specified 
in Section 8E of this By-Law. In considering whether or not to issue a Certificate of Hardship the 
Commission will accept from the applicant expert testimony, or submissions concerning any or all 
of the following information but not limited to : 

1. A professional estimate of the cost of the proposed construction, alteration, demolition, or 
removal and an estimate of any additional costs that would be incurred to comply with the standards 
of the Commission for changes necessary for the issuance of a Historic Certificate; 

2. A report from a licensed engineer or architect; 

3. In the case of demolition, an estimate from an architect, developer, real estate consultant, 
appraiser, or other real estate professional experienced in rehabilitation as to the economic 
feasibility of rehabilitation or reuse of the existing structure; 

4. Estimated market value of the property in its current condition, after completion of the 
proposed construction, alteration, demolition, or removal; and after changes required by the 
Commission, 

5. Appraisals, tax assessments or any listing of the property within the last 2 years, 

I. Each certificate shall be dated and signed, and the Commission shall keep a permanent record of 
its determinations and of the vote of each member participating therein, and shall file a copy or 
notice of certificates and determinations of disapproval with the Town Clerk and the Inspector of 
Buildings. 

J. Any person aggrieved by a determination of the Commission may, within twenty (20) days after 
filing of the notice of determination with the Town Clerk, file a written request with the 
Commission for a review by a person or persons of competence and experience in such matters, 
designated by the Merrimack Valley Planning Commission. 

The finding of the person or persons making such review shall be filed in triplicate with the 
Town Clerk, the Inspector of Buildings, and the Historic District Commission within forty -five 
days after the request, and shall be binding on the applicant and the Commission, unless a further 
appeal is sought as provided in Section 8(K). 



K. Any person aggrieved by a determination of the Commission, or by a finding by the person or 
persons making a review, may twenty days after filing of the notice of such determination or such 
finding with the Town Clerk, appeal to the Superior Court sitting in equity for Essex County. The 
Court shall hear all pertinent evidence and shall annul the determination of the Commission if it 
finds the decision of the Commission to be unsupported by the evidence or to exceed the authority 
of the Commission, or may remand the case for further action by the Commission or make such 
other decree as justice and equity may require. The remedy provided by this Section shall be 
exclusive but the parties shall have all rights of appeal and exception as in other equity cases 

Costs shall not be allowed against the Commission unless it shall appear to the Court that the 
Commission acted with gross negligence, in bad faith or with malice in the matter from which the 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 26. 27. MAY 10, 1 1 

or easements, restrictions or other interests in real property which the Town may have or may 
accept as gifts or otherwise and which the Town may designate the Commission as the 
administrator thereof. 

B. The Commission shall have jurisdiction over the review of new construction, renovation, 
alterations, relocation, and demolition of all exterior architectural features of buildings, structures 
and sites within the Shawsheen Village Historic District, except as limited by this By-Law. 

C. In passing upon matters before it, the Commission shall consider, among other things, the 
historical and architectural value and significance of the site, building or structure, the general 
design arrangement of the features involved and the relation of such features to other features of 
buildings, structures and sites in the surrounding area. In the case of new construction or additions 
to existing buildings or structures the Commission shall consider the appropriateness of the size and 
shape of the building or structure both in relation to the land area upon which the building or 
structure is situated and to buildings and structures in the vicinity. 

SECTION 7. LIMITATIONS AND EXEMPTIONS 

A. The Commission shall not act to prevent or unnecessarily delay new construction, 
reconstruction, or alterations except for the purpose of preventing developments incongruous to 
historical considerations and architectural features of value, viewed in relation to the surrounding 
area. 

B. The following are exempt from review or control by the Commission: 

1 . Interiors of buildings or structures. 

2. Ordinary maintenance and repair, as defined by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
State Building Code 780 CMR. 

3. Landscaping with plants, trees, or shrubs. 

4. Terraces, walks, private sidewalks, driveways, and other similar structures provided that 
the structure is at grade level. However, parking lots or parking areas require Commission review, 
and must be in compliance with the provisions of Section VI, Subsection A of the Town of Andover 
Zoning By-Law 

5. Storm doors and windows, screens, window air conditioners, exterior residential light 
fixtures (ie free standing lamppost, or lighting attached to a structure^, and conventional antennae 
no larger than six feet in any dimension. However, dish antennae and solar collectors require 
Commission review. 

6. The color of paint. 

7. Temporary signs or structures to be in use for not more than ninety days. However, 
temporary signs shall further comply with the requirements of Article VIII, Section VI, Subsection 
B, Paragraph 2f of the Town of Andover Zoning By-Law, as amended from time to time. 
Temporary structures shall further comply with the Commonwealth of Massachusetts State 
Building Code 780 CMR 

8. Signs used for residential occupation or professional purposes, of not more than two square 
feet in area, provided that a) no more than one sign is displayed on or near any one building, or 
structure or site, b) the sign consists of lettering painted on wood without a symbol or trademark, 
and c) all signs must comply with all applicable requirements of Section VI, Subsection B of the 
Town of Andover Zoning By-Law. In addition, signs for commercial and institutional purposes 
require Commission Review 

9. Reconstruction substantially similar in exterior design of a building, structure, or exterior 
architectural feature damaged or destroyed by fire, storm or other-calamity, provided such 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 26. 27. MAY 10, 11 

reconstruction is begun within one year thereafter and is carried forward with due diligence. 
Reconstruction must also meet all applicable requirements of the Town of Andover Zoning By- 
Law. 

SECTION 8 PROCEDURES 

A. Except as this By-Law provides in Section 7, no building, structure or site in the Historic 
District shall be constructed or altered in any way that affects exterior architectural features unless 
the Commission shall first have issued a Certificate of Appropriateness (sec Section 8F), a 
Certificate of Non-Applicability (see Section 8G), or a Certificate of Hardship (see Section 8H) 
with respect to such construction or alteration. In addition, the demolition of any building or 
structure must comply with the requirements of Article XII, Section 33 of the General By-Laws of 
the Town of Andover. In the event of any conflict with the provisions of Article XII, Section 33 of 
the General By-Laws, this By-Law shall prevail. 

B. Applications for certificates shall be made with the Inspector of Buildings. Copies 

of applications shall be forwarded to the Historic District Commission. Applications shall be in a 
form specified by the Commission that adequately describes the proposed work. This may include 
plans and elevations, drawn to scale, detailed enough to show the architectural design of the 
structure and its relation to the existing building. Plot and site plans should be filed when an 
application is made for alterations or improvements involving applicable landscape features such as 
walls and fences. In the case of demolition or removal the Inspector of Buildings shall forward one 
copy of the demolition permit application to the Commission. 

C. Within fourteen days of the filing of an application for any certificate, the Commission shall be 
required to determine whether the application involves any exterior architectural features that are 
within the jurisdiction of this By-Law and therefore requires review by the Commission. In making 
this determination the Commission may designate at its discretion two (2) members of the 
Commission who will determine on behalf of the Commission whether or not the application should 
come before the entire Commission for further review. 

D. If the application requires the Commission review or at the request of the applicant, the 
Commission shall hold a public hearing (a hearing may be waived according to the provisions of 
Chapter 40C of the General Laws as amended). The Commission shall fix a reasonable time for the 
hearing on any application. The Inspector of Buildings shall give public notice of the time, place 
and purposes thereof at least fourteen days before said hearing in such manner as may be 
determined. A copy of said notice shall be mailed, postage prepaid, to the applicant, to the owners 
of all adjoining property and other property deemed by the Commission to be materially affected 
thereby as they appear on the most recent real estate tax list of the Board of Assessors, to the Town 
Planning Board, to such other persons as the Commission shall deem entitled to notice, and those 
property owners within the district that have filed a written request for notice of public hearings ( 
the list is to be renewed annually each December ). 

E. The Commission shall decide upon the determination of any application within sixty days (60) 
of its filing or within such further time as the applicant may choose to allow in writing. 

F. A Certificate of Appropriateness shall be issued to the applicant if the Commission determines 
that the proposed construction or alteration will be appropriate for or compatible with the 
preservation or protection of the Historic District. In the case of a disapproval of an application for a 
Certificate of Appropriateness, the Commission shall place upon its records the reasons for such a 
determination and shall forthwith cause a notice of its determinations, accompanied by a copy of the 
reasons therefore as set forth in the records of the Commission, to be issued to the applicant, and the 
Commission may make recommendations to the applicant with respect to the appropriateness of the 
design. 

Prior to the issuance of any disapproval the Commission may notify the applicant of its 
proposed action, accompanied by recommendations of changes in the applicants proposal which, if 
made, would make the application acceptable to the Commission. If within fourteen days of the 
receipt of such notice, the applicant files a written modificatian-af the application in conformity 
with the recommended changes of the Commission, the Commission shall issue a Certificate of 
Appropriateness to the applicant. 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING -APRIL 26. 27. MAY 10,11 

appeal was taken. Costs shall not be allowed against the party appealing from such a determination 
of the Commission unless it shall appear to the Court that such party acted in bad faith or with 
malice in making the appeal to the Court 

L. The Superior Court sitting in equity for Essex County shall have jurisdiction to enforce the 
provisions of this By-Law and the determinations, rulings and regulations pursuant thereto and may, 
upon the petition of the of the Commission or the Board of Selectmen, restrain by injunction 
violations thereof, and, without limitations, such Court may order the removal of any building, 
structure or exterior architectural feature constructed altered or demolished in violation thereof and 
may issue such other orders for relief as may be equitable. 

M. The Inspector of Buildings is designated as the enforcement agent of the Commission and is 
responsible for investigating and reporting to the Commission any possible violations of any 
provision of this By-Law including those possible offenses identified by any party and reported to 
the Inspector of Buildings. Judgement about whether or not a possible offense(s) is a violation of 
any provisions of this By-law, as well as whether any possible fine should be assessed, ultimately 
rests with the Commission. The Commission shall establish procedures within their rules & 
regulations that outline the steps to be followed by the Inspector of Buildings and the Commission 
in investigating and enforcing possible violations of these bylaws. 

Whoever violates any of the provisions of this By-Law shall be punished by a fine of not more 
than one hundred dollars ($ 100.00) for each offense. Each day during any portion of which a 
violation continues to exist shall constitute a separate offense. Fines, however, will only be 
assessed after the Commission makes the determination that a violation actually exists 

SECTION 9 OTHER 

The Town of Andover shall be subject to the provisions of this By-Law notwithstanding any Town 
By-Law to the contrary. 

SECTION 10. OTHER 

This By-Law may be amended from time to time by a two-thirds vote of the Town Meeting, subject 
to the procedures as set forth in Chapter 40C, Section 3 of the General Laws. The Board of 
Selectmen may set reasonable fees for the administration of this By-Law based on the 
recommendations of the Historic District Commission. 

SECTION 11 OTHER 

In case any section, paragraph or part of this By-Law be for any reason declared invalid or 
unconstitutional by any court of last resort, every other section, paragraph, or part shall continue in 
full force and effect. Except to the extent specifically provided in this By-Law, the definition of 
terms and the powers and rules of conduct of the Commission shall be as set forth in Chapter 40C of 
the General Laws. 

SECTION 12. EFFECTIVE DATE 

Following Town Meeting approval this By-Law, and any change to it subsequently approved, takes 
effect immediately when the following conditions have been met: a) approval by the Attorney 
General of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts; b) filing of a map of the boundaries of the 
Historic District with the Andover Town Clerk, the Andover Inspector of Buildings, and the 
Registry of Deeds for Essex County. 

or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Shawsheen Village Historic District Study Committee 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 84 was moved as printed in the Warrant. 

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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 26. 27. MAY 10, 1 1 

A motion was made and seconded to amend Article 84 "to exclude all homes that do not wish to be 
subject to this article. Notice will be made in writing within 30 days from this date" (May 1 1, 
1999). 

The amendment lost by a Majority vote. 

A motion was made to stop debate. 

The vote to stop debate was declared more than a 2/3 vote by the Moderator. 

The original motion was DEFEATED. 

VOTE: YES: 227 NO: 132 A 2/3 Vote Required 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
School Committee Report: Disapproval 

ARTICLE 85. To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of Chapter 32, Section 102(g) 
and Section 103(h) of the Massachusetts General Laws, as amended by Chapter 456, Section 2, 
Section 3, Section 4 and Section 5 of the Acts of 1998 providing for cost of living adjustments for 
non-contributory retirees, spouses or other beneficiaries or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Andover Contributory Retirement Board 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 85 was approved as printed in the Warrant by a 
Majority vote. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 86. To see if the Town will accept the provisions of Section 288 of Chapter 194 of the 
Acts of 1998 concerning the so-called "Option C Pop-Up" provision of Chapter 32, or take any 
other action related thereto. 

On request of the Andover Contributory Retirement Board 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 86 was approved as printed in the Warrant by a 
Majority vote. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 87. To see if the Town will approve the actions of the Board of Selectmen in layout out 
as a public way under provisions of Chapter 82, Section 21 of the Massachusetts General Laws 
designated as a portion of Alderbrook Road as shown on the plans provided. Copies of the 
following plans have been filed with the Town Clerk as required under Section 23 of Chapter 82: 
"Street Acceptance Plan of Land in Andover, Massachusetts, A Portion of Alderbrook Road, Scale 
1" = 40' Date: January 21, 1999". 

On petition of Rosecliff Realty Trust and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 87 was approved as printed in the Warrant by a 
Majority vote. 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 88. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by transfer from available funds or 
any combination of the foregoing and appropriate a sum not to exceed $30,000 for the purpose of 
contracting with a traffic engineer to prepare a report for the purposes of a grant application for 
roadway and railroad crossing improvements to the Essex Street, School Street, Brook Street, 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 26. 27. MAY 10, 1 1 

Pearson Street, Lupine Road, Railroad Street, Shawsheen Road and Red Spring Road intersections 
in the area of the MBTA railroad crossing including an MBTA railroad crossing at Dundee Park 
and to submit said grant application to the appropriate state and/or federal funding agency, or take 
any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 88 was approved as printed in the Warrant in the 
amount of $30,000 in available funds by a Majority vote. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 89. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by transfer from available funds, 
by borrowing, or by any combination of the foregoing, and appropriate the sum of $50,000 to help 
oppose the construction of the 750-megawatt natural gas power plant being proposed in Dracut by 
Constellation Power Company, less than a mile from the Andover border. 

On petition of Laura Jordan and others 

Upon motion made and seconded it was moved that the Town vote to appropriate the sum of 
$50,000 from available funds to help fund legal counsel, engineering studies, and health impact 
assessment reports pertaining to the 750-megawatt natural gas power plant being proposed in 
Dracut by Constellation Power Company, less than a mile from the Andover border. 

Article 89 was approved by a Majority vote. 

Finance Committee Report: Disapproval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 90. To see if the Town will vote to transfer the care, custody, management and control 
of certain parcels of land, hereinafter described, and the improvements, if any thereon, held by the 
Board of Selectmen and the Department of Public Works to the Board of Selectmen, for the purpose 
of conveyance of said land to Phillips Academy, in exchange for the conveyance of a certain parcel 
of land, owned by Phillips Academy, to the Town for conservation purposes pursuant to 
Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 40 Section 8C and to authorize the Town Manager and the 
Board of Selectmen to petition the General Court for special legislation authorizing said 
conveyances: 

Land to be conveyed by the Town : 

A certain parcel of land in the Town of Andover, Essex County, Massachusetts, being shown as 
Assessors Map 41, Lot 6, at the corner of Main Street and Dwight Street, and containing one acre, 
more or less. Said Lot 6 is to be conveyed subject to the rights of others, if any, including without 
limitation all existing utility easements and subject to such further restrictions as the Selectmen 
deem advisable in the interest of the Town of Andover. 

Land to be conveyed to the Town : 

A certain parcel of land in the Town of Andover, Essex County, Massachusetts, being shown as 
Assessors Map 26, Lot 6, and lying between Salem Street and the Route 125 Bypass, and containing 
seven acres more or less. Said Lot 6 is to be conveyed subject to the rights of others, if any, 
including without limitation all existing utility easements and subject to such further restrictions as 
the Selectmen deem advisable in the interest of the Town of Andover; or take any other action 
related hereto. 

On petition of the Trustees of Phillips Academy and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to Withdraw Article 90 by a Majority vote. 

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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING- APRIL 26. 27. MAY 10. 11 

ARTICLE 91. To see if the Town will vote to discontinue, and to abandon and convey to Phillips 
Academy, a portion of an existing public way, Dwight Street (sometimes previously referred to as 
Back Street and/or Highland Road), which said Dwight Street runs southeasterly and southerly from 
the easterly line of South Main Street and again to the easterly side of South Main Street as 
accepted at Annual Town Meeting, March 14, 1949, Article 45, Page 326, Annual Town Meeting 
Records, said Dwight Street being more particularly described as follows: 

Northerly and Easterly Line : Beginning at a stone bound at easterly line of South Main Street to the 
State Highway in a general southeasterly direction, by a curve to the right having a radius of 25 feet 
a distance of 16.01 feet to a stone bound; thence southeasterly 325.61 feet to a stone bound marking 
an angle in the line; thence southerly 132.95 feet to a point, thence southerly and a little more 
westerly 177.6 feet to a point; thence still southerly a little more westerly 147.03 feet to a stone 
bound; thence southeasterly 149.85 feet to a Massachusetts Highway bound in said easterly line of 
South Main Street. 

Southerly and Westerly Line : Beginning at a stone bound at said easterly line of SouthMain Street, 
said bound being 1 10.51 feet northwesterly from Massachusetts Highway bound marking an angle 
in said Highway line; thence by a curve to the right having a radius of 25 feet, a distance of 62.53 
feet to a stone bound; thence southeasterly by 163.22 feet to a stone bound; thence by a curve to the 
right having a radius of 25 feet, a distance of 28.45 feet to a stone bound; thence southerly 91.38 
feet to a stone bound; thence southwesterly 129. 1 7 feet to a stone bound; thence by a curve to the 
right having a radius of 25 feet, a distance of 65.14 feet to a stone bound and said easterly line of 
South Main Street. 

Said street being 40 feet in width throughout, for the greater part of its length where it joins South 
Main Street at either end of the street as herein described. 

Reference is hereby made to a plan of said road made January, 1949 by Clinton Foster Goodwin, 
Engineer, Haverhill, Massachusetts, said plan being recorded at the office of the Town Clerk, and 
also duly recorded at the Essex North District Registry of Deeds as Plan Number 2028 in the Town 
House, Andover, Massachusetts. 

Said land to be conveyed subject to the rights of others, if any, including without limitation all 
existing utility easements and subject to such further restrictions as the Selectmen deem advisable in 
the interest of the Town of Andover; or take any other action related thereto. 

On petition of the Trustees of Phillips Academy and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to Withdraw Article 91 by a Majority vote. 

ARTICLE 92. To see if the Town v/ill vote to discontinue, to abandon and convey to Phillips 
Academy a portion of an existing public way, School Street, namely the southerly portion of School 
Street at its intersection with South Main Street, being more particularly shown on a Plan entitled 
"Sketch of Land in Andover, MA showing Proposed Street Discontinuance Scale 1 " = 20', Date: 
January 15, 1999", (a copy of which Plan is on file with the Town Clerk's office) and being more 
particularly described as follows: 

Beginning at a point on the westerly sideline of South Main Street marked by a drill hole in 
a stone bound as shown on said Plan; thence running northwesterly as shown on said Plan a distance 
of 245. 17 feet more or less to a point; 

thence turning and running easterly as shown on said Plan 76.08 feet more or less across 
School Street as currently laid out to a point; 

thence turning and running southeasterly a distance of 78.89 feet more or less to a point; 

thence turning and running southerly as shown on said Plan along the westerly sideline of 
South Main Street as shown on said Plan a distance of 1 59.9 1 Sect more or less to the drill hole in 
the stone bound marking the point of beginning. 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 26. 27. MAY 10. 1 1 

Said land to be conveyed subject to the rights of others, if any, including without limitation 
all existing utility easements and subject to such further restrictions as the Selectmen deem 
advisable in the interest of the Town of Andover; or take any other action related thereto 

On petition of the Trustees of Phillips Academy and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to Withdraw Article 92 by a Majority vote. 

ARTICLE 93. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-law VIII. V. 12 (Lot/Slope 
requirements) by combining Section 12.d and 12.e and re-label old Section f. as Section e. The new 
combined Section d. would be as follows: 

d All areas with natural slopes exceeding 25% over a horizontal distance of 10 feet as measured 
perpendicular to the contour on a building lot shall be excluded from the calculation of the 
minimum lot area required for the applicable zoning district and shall be protected and 
remain in their natural state. 

On petition of Abigail L. O'Hara 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to Withdraw Article 93 by a Majority vote. 

ARTICLE 94. To see if the Town will vote to change the use of the existing easement through 
Town land under the control of the Conservation Commission shown on Assessors Map 121, Lot 
2U, from "Water Easement" to "Utility Easement" for the purpose of installing a sewer line within 
the easement between Powers Road and Carter Lane as part of the South Main Street Area Sewer 
Extension and to authorize the Selectmen to obtain said easement by gift, by purchase or by seizure 
by right of eminent domain, if necessary, and to authorize the Selectmen and the Town Manager to 
petition the General Court for special legislation to accomplish the foregoing or to take any other 
action related thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager as recommended by the Public Works Director 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 94 as printed in the 
Warrant. 

VOTE: Declared more than a 2/3 vote by Moderator A 2/3 Vote Required 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Conservation Board Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 95. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Town Manager and Board of 
Selectmen to grant a non-exclusive easement on terms and conditions deemed to be in the best 
interest of the Town for the purposes of motor vehicle and pedestrian access over the following 
described land: owned by the Town starting at a point at the intersection of Andover Street, Lot 9 
and Lot 12 shown on Assessor's Map 1 17 and going Westerly along Andover Street 12 feel; thence 
turning Northerly in a line which is parallel to Assessor's Lot 12, to Assessor's Lot 11; thence 
turning in a Southeasterly direction to Assessor's Lot 12; thence in a Southerly direction 173 feet to 
the point of beginning. This easement is to be used solely for pedestrian and motor vehicle use to 
access a garage to be built on Lot 12 and shall be granted upon the condition that no motor vehicles 
may park or otherwise obstruct such easement area. The easement area is a portion of the land 
owned by the Town of Andover as shown on Assessor's Map 1 17 as Lot 9 and is located off of 
Andover Street. 

On petition of Michael Freidberg and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to Withdraw Article 95 by a Majority vote. 

ARTICLE 96. To see if the Town will vote to amend Appendix E - Traffic Article V. Section 1., 
General Prohibitions, by adding the words "or curbed plannina*trip" to the end of Section V. 1 .(b). 
The by-law would be as follows: 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 26. 27. MAY 1 0, 1 1 

No person shall stand or park and no person shall allow, permit or suffer any vehicle registered in 
his name to stand or park in any of the following places: 

(a) Within any intersection 

(b) Upon any sidewalk or curbed planting strip 

(c) Upon any crosswalk 

or take any other action related thereto. 

On petition of Ronna P. Markell and others 
Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to Withdraw Article 96 by a Majority vote. 



ARTICLE 97. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to accept a grant 
of land for purposes of expanding the existing layout of a portion of Lowell Street, at no cost to the 
Town, which layout expansion involves a strip of land on the southerly side of Lowell Street near 
the Tewksbury Town Line along the front of Assessor's Map 221, Lots 7A & 7B, said strip of land 
totaling approximately 2,287.4 square feet (0.053 acres) and being approximately shown on a Plan 
of Land entitled "Exhibit Plan of Land in Andover, Massachusetts (Essex County) Parcel of Land to 
be Designated for Roadway Improvement Purposes" dated January 21, 1999, prepared by BSC; the 
final layout to be depicted on a plan of land duly recorded with the Registry of Deeds and 
acceptable in all respects to the Board of Selectmen; or take any other action relative thereto. 

On petition of Richard G. Asoian and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was move to approve Article 97 as printed in the Warrant. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was move to amend Article 97 by inserting after the words 
Selectmen" in the last line the following: "such conveyance to be at a time acceptable to the Board 
of Selectmen and subject to such further restrictions as the Board of Selectmen deem appropriate 
and in the interest of the Town of Andover;" 

The amendment was approved by a Majority vote. 

The amended motion was approved by a Majority vote. 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 98. To see if the Town will vote to transfer from available funds and appropriate the 
sum of $4,000 for the purchase and installation of five (5) free-standing signs to identify the 
boundaries of the Ballard vale Historic District, or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Ballardvale Historic District Commission 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 98 was approved as printed in the Warrant in the 
amount of $4,000 from available funds. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

Upon motion made by Town Counsel Thomas Urbelis and duly seconded it was voted by a 
Majority vote to dissolve the Annual Town Meeting at 1 1 :45 P.M. 

A true record 
ATTEST 




-TC^i^n-y 




DIRECTORY OF TOWN OFFICIALS 





AS OF DECEMBER 31 


1, 1999 








ELECTED 






BOARD OF SELECTMEN 






SCHOOL COMMITTEE 




John P. Hess, Ch. 


-2001 




Eric Nadworny, Ch. 


-2002 


Brian P. Major 


-2000 




Frank Eccles 


-2000 


Lori A. Becker 


-2001 




Timothy M. McCarron 


-2000 


Larry L. Larsen 


-2000 




Tina B. Gird wood 


-2001 


Mary N. French 


-2002 




Richard J. Collins 


-2001 


ANDOVER HOUSING AUTHORITY 




REGIONAL SCHOOL COMMITTEE 


Ronald C. Hajj, Ch. 


-2001 




Leo J. Lamontagne, Ch., Lawr. 


-2002 


Jason V. Fox 


-2000 




Joseph M. Gleason, Andover 


-2000 


Norma Villareal 


-2003 


' 


Thomas L. Grondine, Methuen 


-2002 


James A. Cuticchia 


-2004 




Ronald F. Ford, Methuen 


-2002 


Hartley M. Burnham* 


-2001 




Evelyn A. Burke, Lawrence 


-2002 


* Appointed by Cabinet Secretary of 




Sean Neilon, Lawrence 


-2002 


Executive Office of Communities 




Mark Ford, No. Andover 


-2002 


and Development 










TRUSTEES OF PUNCHARD FREE SCHOOL 


TRUSTEES. CORNELL FUND 


Earl G. Efinger 


-2000 




John H. Caswell 


-2001 


Joan M. Lewis 


-2000 




Edward Cole 


-2002 


John R. Petty 


-2000 




Virginia H. Cole 


-2000 


Donna C. Ellsworth 


-2000 








Dr. Eric Stubenhaus 


-2000 








Reverend Calvin F. Mutti 






TOWN MODERATOR 




Reverend James M. Diamond 






James D. Doherty 


-2000 


Reverend Joseph W. LaDu 











■174- 



APPOINTED 



TOWN MANAGER - REGINALD S. STAPCZYNSKI 



FINANCE COMMITTEE 

Donald F. Schroeder, Ch. - 2000 

Margaret I. Jurgen - 2002 

Joanne F. Marden - 2000 

Robert T. King - 2000 

Richard D. Fox - 2000 

Cynthia Milne -2001 

Thomas E. Fardy - 2001 

Margaret M. Bradshaw - 2002 



PLANNING BOARD 

Michael H. Miller, Ch. - 200 1 

Paul J. Salafia - 2002 

Vincent A. Chiozzi, Jr. - 2003 

Susan A. Alovisetti - 2000 

LinnN. Anderson - 1999 
Sheila M. Doherty - Associate - 2001 



ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 



Daniel S. Casper, Ch. 


-2000 


Carol C. McDonough 


-2001 


Paul Bevacqua 


-2001 


Peter F. Reilly 


-2002 


Pamela H. Mitchell 


-2002 


David W. Brown - Associate 


-2002 


Nancy K. Jeton - Associate 


-2000 


Stephen D. Anderson - Associate 


-2001 


Lois Karfunkel - Associate 


-2000 


CONSERVATION COMMISSION 




Robert A. Pustell, Ch. 


-2000 


Donald D. Cooper 


-2002 


Paul J. Finger 


-2001 


Thomas J. Murphy 


-2000 


Gail L. Ralston 


-2000 


Prasanta K. Bhunia 


-2002 


Philip Sutherland 


-2001 



MEMORIAL HALL LIBRARY TRUSTEES 



Karen M. Herman, Ch. 


-2002 


Karen M. Herman, Ch. 


-2000 


Patricia H. Edmonds 


-2000 


Ann E. Constantine 


-2002 


Matthew L. Russell 


-2001 


Norma A. Gammon 


-2002 


Thomas J. Swift 


-2001 


James S. Batchelder 


-2000 


Laurence J. Lamagna 


-2000 


Dennis Ingram 


-2001 


Ruth M. Dunbar 


-2002 


Raymond H. Flynn 


-2001 


Maria A. Rizzo 


-2000 


Mark DeLisio 


-2001 


BOARD OF HEALTH 




BOARD OF ASSESSORS 




Dr. Douglas Dunbar, Ch. 


-2000 


Bruce Symmes 


-2001 


Joseph I. Pelc 


-2001 


Archibald D. Maclaren 


-2000 


Dr. Daniel E. Coleman 


-2002 


John R. Petty 


-2002 


DESIGN ADVISORY GROUP 


TOWLE FUND 





Ann E. Constantine - 2001 

Susan W. Alovisetti - 2001 

Donald J. Harding - 2002 



Phillip F. Sullivan 
Ruth E. Westcott 



2002 
2000 



CABLE ADVISORY COMMITTEE 

John R. Dempsey. Ch. - 2002 

Annetta R. Freedman - 2000 

Barbara Worcester - 2000 

Gerald H. Silverman - 2002 

Roger L. Jenkins - 2001 



RETIREMENT BOARD 

James Cuticchia, Ch. 
Marianne O'Leary 
John C. Doherty 
James L. Edholm 
Rodney P. Smith 



2002 
2001 
2002 
2000 
Open 



•175- 



BALLARD VALE HISTORIC DIST. COMM. 



PATRIOTIC HOLIDAY COMMITTEE 



Dennis Ingram, Ch. 


-2001 


Calvin A. Deyermond, Ch. 


-2000 


Diane R. Derby 


-2002 


John A. Campbell 


-2000 


Sherron Heller 


-2001 


John J. Lewis 


-2000 


Perry M. Raffi 


-2002 


' Harold W. Wright 


-2000 


Ron Abraham 


-2000 


John C. Doherty 


-2000 


Edward J. Morrissey 


-2000 


Edward J. Morrissey 


-2000 


Christian Huntress 


-2000 


Edward Cole 


-2000 


Charles Murnane, Jr. - Alt. 


-2000 


Susan W. Ratya 


-2000 


Ron Kravette - Alt. 


-2000 


James M. Deyermond 


-2000 


SCHOOL BUILDING COMMITTEE 


RECYCLING COMMITTEE 




Mark B. Johnson, Ch. 


-2001 


James T. Curtis, Ch. 


-2001 


Alan J. Champagne 


-2002 


Anne Wein 


-2000 


Dr. Claudia L. Bach 


-2002 


Elizabeth Richter 


-2001 


John J. Driscoll 


-2001 


Candy Dann 


-2000 


Tina B. Gird wood 


-2002 


Jamie Doucett 


-2002 


Raymond E. Hender 


-2000 


Sheila Lane 


-2001 


Bernard R. Morrissey 


-2000 


Joyce Ringleb 


-2001 


SPRING GROVE CEMETERY TRUSTEES 


IND. DEV. FINANCING AUTHORITY 


Paul Caselle, Ch. 


-2002 


Michael W. Morris, Esq., Ch. 


-2000 


John S. Bigelow 


-2002 


Dr. Thomas J. Swift 


-2000 


Robert S. Hamilton 


-2001 


John E. Shuman 


-2001 


Arthur H. Richter 


-2000 


Charles H. Wesson, Jr. 


-2001 


Joyce M. Ritterhaus 


-2001 






YOUTH COUNCIL 




DEVELOPMENT & INDUSTRIAL COMM. 


Colleen Georgian 


-2002 


Dr. Thomas J. Swift 


-2000 


Craig D. Gibson 


-2002 


S. Joseph Hoffman 


-2000 


COMMISSION ON DISABILITIES 


CULTURAL COUNCIL 




Michael Warshawsky, Ch. 


-2001 


Sharon R. Mason, Ch. 


-2001 


Mark Walker 


-2001 


Mark Efinger 


-2001 


Mark E. Van Doren 


-2002 


Marcelle Gregg 


-2002 


Justin J. Coppola, Jr. 


-2001 


Barbara Rogers 


-2001 


Justin J. Coppola, Sr. 


-2002 


Robert Katz 


-2001 


Madelaine St. Amand 


-2000 


Norma Villarreal 


-2001 


Gilbert DeMoor 


-2002 






Karen Jacobs-Gold' 


-2002 






HOUSING PARTNERSHIP COMMITTEE 


SCHOLARSHIP COMMITTEE 




David Hastings 


-2002 


Kathleen M. Hess 


-2000 


Christopher D. Haynes 


-2002 


Win Ryan 


-2000 


Lorene A. Comeau 


-2002 


Madhu Sridhar 


-2000 


Ronald C. Hajj 


-2002 


Cynthia Milne 


-2000 


John D. O'Brien, Jr. 


-2002 


Sheila Doherty 


-2000 


Susan G. Stott 


-2002 


Ruby Easton 


-2000 






David Reilly 


-2000 






Stephanie Smith 


-2000 






-176- Rosalie Konjoian 


-2000 



COUNCIL ON AGING 



SENIOR CENTER BUILDING COMM. 



Dorothy L. Bresnahan, Ch. 


-2002 


Dorothy L. Bresnahan, Ch. 


-2001 


Martin Epstein 


-2002 


Spencer Johnson 


-2001 


Oscar Rosenberg 


-2002 


Frank Sherman 


-2000 


Paul J. Salafia 


-2000 


Doreen Correnti 


-2002 


Robert J. Schneider, MD 


-2001 


Parke Sickler 


-2000 


Arthur W. Smith 


-2000 


Tim Sullivan 


-2001 


Deborah Silberstein 


-2001 


Donna LaConti 


-2002 


Elizabeth Tice 


-2001 


Rita M. Carrier 


-2002 


Marlies Zammuto 


-2001 






MILLENNIUM COMMITTEE 


BALLARD VALE/LOWELL JUNCTION AREA 


John McMullen, Ch. 


-2001 


TRAFFIC TASK FORCE 




Mary W. Moran 


-2001 


Mary French, Chair 


-2000 


Antoinette Hauck 


-2001 


Philip Wormwood 


-2000 


Harold J. Wright 


-2001 


Douglas White 


-2000 


Olga Palenski 


-2001 


Jean Verzola-Henry 


-2000 


Gwen L. Kearn 


-2001 


Christian C. Huntress 


-2000 


Stephen Stapinski 


-2001 


Lawrence P. Johnson 


-2000 


James Doherty 


-2001 


Skip Hartwell 


-2000 


Arthur Smith 


-2001 


Joseph W. Watson 


-2000 


Bernice Downs 


-2001 


Ed Deloury 


-2000 


Judith Avery 


-2001 


Arthur H. Barber 


-2000 


Norma Gammon 


-2001 


Michael Frishman 


-2000 


Ted Teichert 


-2001 


George H. Baxter 


-2000 


Jeanne Madden 


-2001 


Dan Sullivan 


-2000 


William Fahey 


-2001 


Perry Raffi 


-2000 


Mary Donohue 


-2001 


Audrey Nason 


-2000 


John Doherty 


-2001 


William M. Langdell 


-2000 


Kim Stamas 


-2001 


Richard Nill 


-2000 


Eileen Woods 


-2001 






Mary Carbone 


-2001 







GR. LAWRENCE SANITARY DISTRICT REP. 



John A. Petkus, Jr. 



-2001 



MERR. VALLEY PLANNING COMM. 



Stephen L. Colyer 



2000 



DIR. OF EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT 

Brian J. Pattullo - 2000 

BOARD OF REGISTRARS 

Joanne D. Dee - 2000 

Carolyn Simko - 2002 

Wendall Mattheson - 2001 



NORTHEAST SOLID WASTE COMM. REP. 

John A. Petkus, Jr. - 2000 

MERR VALLEY REG. TRANSIT AUTHORITY 



Stephen L. Colyer 

INSPECTOR OF ANIMALS 

Richard D. Lindsay, DVM 

VETERANS AGENT 

John C. Doherty 



2000 



-2000 



2000 



•177- 



TOWN OF ANDOVER DEPARTMENT/DIVISION HEAD DIRECTORY 



Community Development & Planning Department 
Director of Health 
Director of Planning 
Conservation Administrator 
Inspector of Buildings 
Electrical Inspector 
Plumbing, Gas & Sewer Inspector 

Director of Community Services 

Director of Elder Services 

Emergency Management Director 

Finance and Budget Department 
Finance Director 
Chief Assessor 
Collector/Treasurer 
Information Systems Manager 
Purchasing Agent/Insurance Coordinator 
Veterans Service Agent 

Fire Chief 

Housing Authority Executive Director 

Human Resources Director 

Plant and Facilities Department 
Director 

Superintendent of Building Maintenance 
Superintendent of Parks and Grounds 
Superintendent of Plumbing, Heating and Electrical 

Police Chief 

Operations Commander 

Public Works Department 
Director 

Highway Superintendent 
Superintendent of Water & Sewer Distribution 
Town Engineer 

Memorial Hall Library Director 

Superintendent of Schools 

Town Accountant 

Town Clerk 

Town Counsel 



Town Manager 

Director of Youth Services 



•178- 



Everett F. Penney, Jr. 

Stephen L. Colyer 

James A. Greer 

Kaija M. Gilmore 

Richard J. Salenas 

Bruce P. Hale 

Mary L. Donohue 

Jeanne M. Madden 

Brian J. Pattullo 

Anthony J. Torrisi 

Bruce A. Symmes 

David J. Reilly 

Barbara D. Morache 

Elaine M. Shola 

John C. Doherty 

Harold J. Wright 

Christine L. Metzemaekers 

Candace A. Hall 

Joseph R. Piantedosi 

Kenneth H. Parker 

John D. O'Donnell, Jr. 

Stephen J. George 

Brian J. Pattullo 
Lt. Richard W. Enos 

John A. Petkus, Jr. 

John F. Canavan, Jr. 

Morris B. Gray 

Brian W. Moore 

James E. Sutton 

Dr. Claudia L. Bach 

Rodney P. Smith 

Randall L. Hanson 

Thomas J. Urbelis 

Reginald S. Stapczynski 

William D. Fahey 



***************** 

HOW CAN WE HELP YOU? 

***************** 

Mailing Address: 

Town Offices, 36 Bartlet Street, Andover, MA 01810 

Business Hours at the Town Offices: 



8:30 A.M. - 4:30 P.M. Monday - Friday 
(Building Division - 8:00 A.M. - 4:00 P.M.) 



Telephone Numbers: 

POLICE/FIRE - EMERGENCY 9 1 1 

Fire Department - Business 623-8466 

Police Department - Business 475-041 1 

Animal Control Officer 475-04 1 1 

Town Offices Switchboard 623-8200 

Fax Number 623-8221 

DCS Classes & Activities 623-8273/8274 

Department of Public Works 623-8350 

Human Resources Office 623-8530 

Memorial Hall Library 623-8400 

Senior Center 623-8321 

Superintendent of Schools 623-8501 



Andover's Home Page: http://www.town.andover.ma.us 
Memorial Hall Library's Home Page: www.mhl.org 
Andover's Population: 30,500 Square Miles: 32 



Number of Acres: 19,900 

1,728 controlled by Conservation Commission 
1,000 owned by A.V.I.S. 
889 owned by Commonwealth - Harold Parker State Forest 

-179- 



Andover's Tax Rate: 



$14.65 - Residential and Open Space 

$20. 1 1 - Commercial/Industrial & Personal Property 



When are Taxes Due: 



Taxes are due quarterly on the following dates: 
August 1st - November 1st - February 1st - May 1st 



Excise Tax Information: Call Assessor's Office at 623-8264 



Recycling: 



Curbside Pickup: 



Every other week - recyclables (glass - clear, green & brown - 
newspapers, magazines, junk mail and paper board (cereal & cracker 
boxes) and steel & tin cans - crush/flatten) will be collected on the 
same day as the trash collection. Place recycling bin curbside by 
7:00 A.M. on your pick up day. 



Recycling Information & Complaints: Call Waste Management, Inc. at 1-800-562-0321 



Recycling Site: 
Compost Site: 



Third Saturday of each month at West Middle School from 9:00 
A.M. to 1:00 P.M. Plastics (#1 & #2) and aluminum materials. 

High Plain Road (Bald Hill area). Leaves and grass clippings. Open 
year round for walk-ins, drive-ins as announced in local newspapers. 



Rubbish Complaints or Inquiries: BFI at 1-800-442-9006 



Pothole or Snow Removal Complaints: 



Highway Division at 623-8426 or 
Dept. of Public Works at 623-8350 



How to Dispose of an Appliance: Appliances can no longer be left curbside with your trash - 

their disposal is the homeowner's responsibility. Suggestions 
for disposal: hire a private contractor or check with the 
company where your new appliance was purchased to see if 
they will take the old appliance. 



•180- 



Town Meeting and Election: 



Town Election is held the fourth Tuesday of March. Andover 
has an Open Town Meeting which is generally held four 
weeks following the Town Election. 



Voter Registration Information: 



Town Clerk's Office 



623-8255 



Where To Inquire About or Obtain Licenses & Permits: 

Ballfield Permits & Rentals 



Birth Certificate 

Building Permits 

(construction, plumbing, gas, electric) 

Business Certificate 

Death Certificate 

Dog License 

Fishing & Hunting License 

Food Service License 

Liquor License 
(Annual or One-Day) 

Marriage License 

Open Air Burning Permit 

Smoke Detector Permit 

Street Opening Permit 

Town House Rental 

Zoning By-law Variance 



Facilities Coordinator 623-8450 

at Town House 

Town Clerk's Office 623-8255 

Building Division 623-8301 

(Office Hours: 8:00 A.M. - 10:00 A.M.) 



Town Clerk's Office 


623-8255 


Town Clerk's Office 


623-8255 


Town Clerk's Office 


623-8255 


Town Clerk's Office 


623-8255 


Health Division 


623-8295 or 


Town Clerk's Office 


623-8255 


Town Clerk's Office 


623-8255 


Town Clerk's Office 


623-8255 


Fire Department 


623-8466 


Fire Department 


623-8466 


Dept. of Public Works 


623-8350 


Facilities Coordinator 


623-6450 


at Town House 




Building Division 


623-8301 or 


Board of Appeals Office 


623-8315 



■181- 



***************** 

HOW TO REACH YOUR ELECTED OFFICIALS 

***************** 

United States Senators: 

The Honorable Edward M. Kennedy (D) 

2400 John F. Kennedy Federal Building, Boston, MA 02203 

(617)565-3170 

SR-315 Russell Senate Office Building, Washington, DC 20510 

(202) 224-4543 

The Honorable John F. Kerry (D) 

One Bowdoin Square, Boston, MA 021 14 

(617)565-8519 

SR-362 Russell Senate Office Building, Washington, DC 20510 

(202) 224-2742 

United States Representative: 

Honorable Martin T. Meehan (D) 

Fifth Congressional District 

1 1 Kearney Square, Lowell, MA 01 852 

(508)459-0101 

1216 Longworth House Office Building, Washington, DC 20515 

(202)225-3411 

State Senator: 

Susan C. Tucker (D) 

Second Essex & Middlesex District 

6 Farrwood Drive, Andover, MA 01810 

State House, Room 416B, Boston, MA 02133 

(617)722-1612 . 

State Representatives: 

Barry R. Finegold (D) 

Seventeenth Essex District 

1 6 Balmoral Street, Andover, MA 01810 

State House, Room 436, Boston, MA 02 1 33 

(617)722-2575 

David M. Nangle (D) 

Eighteenth Middlesex District 

43 Crowley Street, Lowell, MA 01852 

State House, Room 448, Boston, MA 02133 

(617)722-2582 

-182- 



WE WOULD LIKE TO HEAR FROM YOU 



The Board of Selectmen and Town Manager welcome your ideas and comments about our 
municipal services and policies, or any general comments you may have about the Town of 
Andover. Please let us know what you think on this survey and return it to: 




TOWN MANAGER'S OFFICE 

TOWN OFFICES 

36 BAKTLET STREET, ANDOVER, MA 01810 



P. Hess 
iairman, Board of Selectmen 




dd S. S 
Town Manager 






Tell us one thing that you really like that the Town does. 



Tell us one thing that you would like to see improved upon. . 



■183- 



Name and Address (Optional)